184 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. desalesuniversity-my.sharepoint.com desalesuniversity-my.sharepoint.com
    1. range of digital literacy practices

      This is a significant aspect of social annotation/Hypothesis. The low barrier for entry and the low-stakes nature of the work make it a great way to develop digilit, potentially, as people can engage with connecting and linking in their writing.

  3. Jul 2022
  4. Jun 2022
    1. Es gilt daher, diese digitale Affinität der Studie-renden methodisch und inhaltlich zu motivieren und philosophisch fruchtbar zumachen

      Das sagt Will Richardson auch für den Bereich der Schule so. Es muss, in der Schule noch mehr, v.a. pädagogische und didaktische Expertise in digitale Transformationen einfließen. Man läuft sonst Gefahr u.a. Konsumtendenzen nicht kritisch gegenüber treten zu können und unmündiges Verhalten an den Tag zu legen und im schlimmsten Falle zu lehren.

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  5. May 2022
    1. I grew up on PHP, it was the first thing beyond BASIC I ever wrote

      Should we lean into that? Maybe some sort of "server BASIC" is what we need.

      NB: need not (read: "should not") actually be a BASIC; moreso a shared spirit (see also: Hypercard)

    1. Updating the script

      This is less than ideal. Besides non-technical people needing to wade into the middle of (what very well might appear to them to be a blob of) JS to update their site, here are some things that Zonelets depends on JS for:

      1. The entire contents of the post archives page
      2. The footer
      3. The page title

      This has real consequences for e.g. the archivability for a Zonelets site.

      The JS-editing problem itself could be partially ameliorated by with something like the polyglot trick used on flems.io and/or the way triple scripts do runtime feature detection using shunting. When the script is sourced via script element from another page, it behaves as JS, but when visited directly as the browser destination it is treated like HTML and has its own DOM tree for the script itself to make the necessary modifications easier. Instead of requiring the user to edit it as freeform text, provide a structured editing interface, so e.g. adding a new post is as simple as clicking the synthesized "+" button in the list of posts, copying the URL of the post in question, and then pasting it in—to a form field. The Zonelets script itself should take care of munging it into the appropriate format upon form "submission". It can also, right there, take care of the escaping issue described in the FAQ—allow the user to preview the generated post title and fix it up if need be.

      Additionally, the archives page need not by dynamically generated by the client—or rather, it can be dynamically filled in exactly once per update—on the author's machine, and then be reified into static HTML, with the user being instructed to save it and overwrite the served version. This gets too unwieldy for next/prev links in the footer, but (a) those are non-essential, and don't even get displayed for no-JS users right now, anyway; and (b) can be seen to violate the entire "UNPROFESSIONAL" etthos.

      Alternatively, the entire editing experience can be complimented with bookmarklets.

  6. Apr 2022
    1. The historian in me always wants to look back at how this sort of media control has played out historically, so thinking about examples like William Randolph Hearst, Henry Luce, David Sarnoff, Axel Springer, Kerry Packer, or Rupert Murdoch across newspapers, radio, television, etc. might be interesting. See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_proprietor

      Tim Wu's The Master Switch is pretty accessible in this area.


      On the intercultural front, the language (very careful public relations and "corporate speak") used in this leaked audio file of the most recent Twitter All Hands phone call might be fascinating and an interesting primary source for some of the questions you might be looking at on such an assignment. https://peertube.dk/w/2q8cdKR1mTCW7RyMQhcBEx

      Who are the multiple audiences (acknowledged and unacknowledged) being addressed? (esp. as they address leaks of information in the call.)

    1. Literacy is expanding

      Why the choice of this metaphor? Is literacy an accordion file? Is it that the definition of literacy is expanding? Who has the right to say what literacy means or how it expands? Or is this position statement a backward looking report on the change that has already taken place? I have been using cheap and adaptable media tools for years but I am still writing "essays" and "poems" and research presentations with them just like I did in the analog 20th century days.

  7. Mar 2022
    1. ‘connected educator’

      An interesting term ... what makes a digitally literate educator a connected one?

    2. PLNs (professional learning networks) and their role in supporting the development of  ‘connected educators’.

      Professional learning networks support professional development of educators (who are digitally literate). Is this a more modern connected version or an extension of communities of practice?

  8. citeseerx.ist.psu.edu citeseerx.ist.psu.edu
    1. The complete overlapping of readers’ and authors’ roles are important evolution steps towards a fully writable web, as is the ability of deriving personal versions of other authors’ pages.
    2. Writing for the web is still a complex and technically sophisticated activity. Too many tools, languages, protocols, expectations and requirements have to be considered together for the creation of web pages and sites.
    1. Taking search as a learning instrument to the next level of engagement, dashboards can be used educationally as well as journalistically. I know a sixth-grade teacher who had her students create dashboards instead of writing papers.

      Dashboards bauen in der Schule

    2. Levy asked them to keep a log of their email behavior for a week

      Protokoll des Emailverhaltens - analog könnte man sagen des social media Verhaltens, des online Verhaltens (hier sollte aber eine Konkretisierung dazukommen) smartphone Verhaltens (mithilfe von Screentimeanalyseapps) - bei dem Protokoll/Tagebuch ist es wichtige auch emotionales Befinden UND Atmung zu notieren, um festzuhalten wie diese durch den Mediengebrauch beeinflusst werden

    3. nstead of “Am I dreaming?” try “Have I drifted?”

      Treibe ich weg? Parallele zu Klarträumen - Träume ich?

    4. Having helped train her dyslexic son to read, plus having studied dys-lexia scientifically, Wolf appears to be a strong believer in the power of teaching and learning. She contends that the demonstrable power of teach-ing alphabetic literacy can be applied to the challenge of information and media literacies:We must teach our children to be “bitextual” or “multitextual,” able to read and ana-lyze texts flexibly in different ways, with more deliberate instruction at every stage of development on the inferential, demanding aspects of any text. . . . My major conclusion from an examination of the developing reader is a cautionary one. I fear that many of our children are in danger of becoming just what Socrates warned us against—a society of decoders of information, whose false sense of knowing distracts them from a deeper development of their intellectual potential. It does not need to be so, if we teach them well, a charge that is equally applicable to our children with dyslexia.71Developing a pedagogy of attention is, I believe, the basis for Wolf’s kind of education.

      Entwicklung einer Pädagogik der Aufmerksamkeit als Basis für eine Erziehung, die analog zur Erziehung von dyslexischen Kindern zum Lesen, alle Kinder die Orientierung in der von den Kindern dekodierten Informationsflut lehrt.

    5. The analytical, inferential, perspective-taking reading brain with all its capacity for human consciousness, and the nimble, multifunctional, multimodal, information-integrative capacities of a digital mind-set do not need to inhabit exclusive realms

      Annahme: digitales mind-set und Lektürekompetenz schließen einander nicht aus

  9. Feb 2022
    1. The problem almost certainly starts with the conception of what we're doing as "building websites".

      When we do so, we mindset of working on systems

      If your systems work compromises the artifacts then it's not good work

      This is part of a broader phenomenon, which is that when computers are involved with absolutely anything people seem to lose their minds good sensibilities just go out the window

      low expectations from everyone everyone is so used to excusing bad work

      sui generis medium

      violates the principle of least power

      what we should be doing when grappling with the online publishing problem—which is what this is; that's all it is—is, instead of thinking in terms of working on systems, thinking about this stuff in such a way that we never lose sight of the basics; the thing that we aspire to do when we want to put together a website is to deal in

      documents and their issuing authority

      That is, a piece of content and its name (the name is a qualified name that we recognize as valid only when the publisher has the relevant authority for that name, determined by its prefix; URLs)

      that's it that's all a Web site is

      anything else is auxiliary

      really not a lot different from what goes on when you publish a book take a manuscript through final revisions for publication and then get an ISBN issued for it

      so the problem comes from the industry

      people "building websites" like politicians doing bad work and then their constituents not holding them accountable because that's not how politics works you don't get held accountable for doing bad work

      so the thing to do is to recognize that if we're thinking about "websites" from any other position things that technical people try to steer us in the direction of like selecting a particular system and then propping it up and how to interact with a given system to convince it to do the thing we want it to do— then we're doing it wrong

      we're creating content and then giving it a name

  10. Jan 2022
  11. Nov 2021
  12. Sep 2021
    1. Near the end (@1:50:32):

      My website is glench.com, and that's kind of my repository of everything I've ever made

    2. Around 1:48:00

      What if every library that you use had, like, some interactive documentation or interactive representation? [...] The author could maybe add annotations.

    1. playing house

      This is how I feel about most people's personal websites. Few people have homepages these days, but even for people who do, even fewer of those homes have anyone really living there. All their interesting stuff is going on on Twitter, GitHub, comments on message boards...

      Really weird when this manifests as a bunch of people having really strong opinions about static site tech stacks and justifications for frontend tech that in practice they never use, because the content from any one of their profiles on the mainstream social networks outstrips their "home" page 100x to 1.

  13. Aug 2021
    1. I looked at workflows that were similar to GitHub Pages. I realized that what I was craving was very simple: Write text. Put on internet. Repeat.
    1. The reason we keep using email is that for that set of tasks requiring more than plaintext but less than an app we have nothing. MS Word maybe.
    2. chances are it’s a worthless piece of junk to you compared to the email method
    3. When Nicole shops, she writes it out on a sheet of paper
    1. Funnily enough, I've been on an intellectual bent in the other direction: that we've poisoned our thinking in terms of systems, for the worse. This shows up when trying to communicate about the Web, for example.

      It's surprisingly difficult to get anyone to conceive of the Web as a medium suited for anything except the "live" behavior exhibited by the systems typically encountered today. (Essentially, thin clients in the form of single-page apps that are useless without a host on the other end for servicing data and computation requests.) The belief/expectation that content providers should be given a pass for producing brittle collections of content that should be considered merely transitory in nature just leads to even more abuse of the medium.

      Even actual programs get put into a ruddy state by this sort of thinking. Often, I don't even care about the program itself, so much as I care about the process it's applying, but maintainers make this effectively inextricable from the implementation details of the program itself (what OS version by which vendor does it target, etc.)

  14. Jul 2021
    1. The world could benefit from a curated set of bookmarklets in the style of Smalltalk ("doIt", "printIt", etc buttons) that you can place in your bookmarks bar (or copy into a bookmarks document and open in it in your browser), where the purpose would be to allow you to:

      1. access a new scratch area (about:blank) for experimentation
      2. make it editable, or make any given element on a page editable
      3. let you evaluate any code written into the scratch space

      scratch.js aims for something something similar, and though laudable it falls short of what I actually crave (and what I imagine would be be most beneficial/appreciated by the public).

    1. Taking my own advice, this document was written in the world’s greatestweb authoring tool: LibreOffice Writer.

      Great. This is something that I advocate for technical people to put forth as a "serious" solution more often than I see today (which is essentially never). But next time, save it as HTML. (And ditch the stylistic "rubbish"; don't abuse "the sanctity of the written word by coercing it to serve the vanity of a graphic artist incapable of discharging his duty as a mere lieutenant".)

    2. There used to be an internet middle class, of non-commercial users whowere not overtly technical, but were still able to self-publish.

      This is probably the least flawed claim in the entire piece.

    1. You can use LibreOffice's Draw

      Nevermind LibreOffice Draw, you can use LibreOffice Writer to author the actual content. That this is never seriously pushed as an option (even, to my knowledge, by the LibreOffice folks themselves) is an indictment of the computing industry.

      Having said that, I guess there is some need to curate a set of templates for small and medium size businesses who want their stuff to "pop".

  15. Jun 2021
    1. Some of the best customers of such a service will be academics.

      Indeed. Web literacy among the masses is pitifully low. Browsermakers are certainly to blame for being poor stewards. Hot Valley startups are responsible as well. (See https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/30/salary/.)

    1. Slides from

      Panel: Digital Literacies

      How do the collaborative and multimodal qualities of social annotation encourage digital literacies? Join an expert panel of educators and researchers as they share their projects and perspectives, as well as discuss how social annotation exemplifies creative and interactive digital literacies. The panel will be moderated by Mary Klann (History, UC San Diego/San Diego Miramar College) and features speakers Jenae Cohn (Academic Technology, CSU Sacramento), Cherise McBride (Education, UC Berkeley), and Paul Schacht (English/Digital Learning, SUNY Geneseo).

    1. faculty assume that students know how to, for example, take notes

      are note-taking skills taught at all?

    2. reading at the college level can be a real challenge for students from any discipline

      teaching how to read is an ongoing project. Digital reading techniques need to be introduced, reinforced and practiced across courses.

    1. I tried all the different static site generators, and I was annoyed with how everything was really complicated. I also came to the realization that I was never going to need a content management system with the amount of blogging I was doing, so I should stop overanalyzing the problem and just do the minimum thing that leads to more writing.

      Great way to put it. One thing that I keep trying to hammer is that the "minimum thing" here looks more like "open up a word processor, use the default settings, focus on capturing the content—i.e. writing things out just as you would if you were dumping these thoughts into a plain text file or keeping it to, say, the subset of Markdown that allows for paragraph breaks, headings, and maybe ordered and unordered lists—and then use your word processor's export-to-HTML support to recast it into the format that lets use their browser to read it, and then FTP/scp/rsync that to a server somewhere".

      This sounds like I'm being hyperbolic, and I kind of am, but I'm also kind of not. The process described is still more reasonable than the craziness that people (HN- and GitHub-type people) end up leaping into when they think of blogging on a personal website. Think about that. Literally uploading Microsoft Word-generated posts to a server* is better than the purpose-built workflows that people are otherwise coming up with (and pushing way too hard).

      (*Although, just please, if you are going to do this, then do at least export to HTML and don't dump them online as PDFs, a la berkshirehathaway.com.)

  16. Apr 2021
    1. Though its format can be copied and manipulated, HTML doesn’t make that easy.

      In fact, HTML makes it very easy (true for the reasons that lead Mark to write that it can be copied and manipulated). It's contemporary authoring systems and the typical author-as-publisher and the choices they make that are what makes this difficult.

      The future of rich media lies in striving to be more like dead media (or at least mining it for insights by better understanding it through thoughtful study), rather than the misguided attempts we've been living inside.

      (This is something that I've done a 180 on in the last year or so.)

    2. It’s designed so that whoever produced the video controls how it appears, and how it’s used.

      It is exactly that "timid" ("tepid"?) attempt at dynamism that has led to these circumstances.

  17. Feb 2021
    1. The first web browser was also an editor. The idea being that not only could everyone read content on the web, but they could also help create it. It was to be a collaborative space for everyone.

      This is really interesting. I think we have got used to the fact that the internet is mostly a passive space - where we search for things. Perhaps we sometime ask questions. And there are only some spaces, where we are actually creative ourselves.

      Hypothes.is is the powerful idea that you can annotate the web.

      Solid is a more radical solution. It is the idea that you can also control what data you share with other.

  18. Oct 2020
    1. Der Guardian über das estnische Bildungssystem und den Covid-19-Lockdown. Rechtzeitige Digitalisierung hat dafür gesorgt, dass die Schulen so leistungsfähig geblieben sind wie davor.

    1. While individuals use these tools in the hope that their training will improve their performance, this relationship is not a given. This paper proposes that an individual's level of digital literacy affects her performance through its impact on her performance and effort expectations. To explain the influence of digital li

      This is the very reason I selected this paper. Digital literacy is also a factor in determining one's technological acumen.

    1. How is digital fluency different from digital literacy? In learning a foreign language, a literate person can read, speak, and listen for understanding in the new language. A fluent person can create something in the language: a story, a poem, a play, or a conversation. Similarly, digital literacy is an understanding of how to use the tools; digital fluency is the ability to create something new with those tools. Digital fluency can be viewed as an evolving collection of fluencies including, but not limited to, curiosity fluency, communication fluency, creation fluency, data fluency, and innovation fluency.

      This comparison takes a narrow view of digital literacy. Often the term includes the ability to critically evaluate digital content and to create digital media (see e.g. Perspectives of digital literacies. However, the concept of digital fluency is also useful and this definition includes useful elements.

    1. Digital literacy should be positioned as an entitlement for students that supports their full participation in a society in which social, cultural, political, and financial life are increasingly mediated by digital literacies

      Positioning digital literacy as an entitlement is useful language to persuade individual educators and institutions that digital literacy is core to 21st century education, not just an optional add-on.

    1. being able to follow links to “follow a conversation” that is threaded on Twitter.

      This is one of my favorite parts about my website and others supporting Webmention: the conversation is aggregated onto or more closely adjacent to the source. This helps prevent context collapse.

      Has anyone made a browser tool for encouraging lateral reading? I'd love a bookmarklet that I could click to provide some highly relevant lateral reading resources for any particular page I'm on.

  19. Sep 2020
    1. But I end up coming back to this simple stuff because I can’t shake the feeling that digital literacy needs to start with the mirror and head-checks before it gets to automotive repair or controlled skids. Because it is these simple behaviors, applied as habits and enforced as norms, that have the power to change the web as we know it, to break our cycle of reaction and recognition, and ultimately to get even our deeper investigations off to a better start.

      I find this quite interesting because of the analogies that are given. Many people find it hard or make it seem hard to investigate what is presented on the internet when in all honesty, the process will get easier to the point that it is considered a mirror check, something we humans do constantly.

  20. Jul 2020
    1. Simply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web.

      I remember having to take a computer science course in high school/middle school, but it mainly focused on developing digital skills instead of digital literacies

  21. Jun 2020
  22. May 2020
  23. Apr 2020
    1. Nous pouvons constater qu’il y a un lien entre les formes produites et les moyens mis en œuvre pour les produire.

      dans une perspective nativement numérique, écrire et produire sont alors intrinsèquement liés.

      par exemple: dans le modèle du manuscrit rédigé à la main ou tapé à la dactylo, le processus de production est au mieux analogue (consistant à reproduire des lettres que l'auteur a posées sur papier), au pire complètement hétérogène à l'acte d'écriture (il faut prendre le processus du début pour en faire un livre publiable).

  24. Feb 2020
    1. Do learners seek out texts that consider multiple perspectives and broaden their understanding of the world? Do learners critically analyze a variety of information and ideas from a variety of sources? Do learners choose texts and tools to consume, create, and share ideas that match their need and audience? Do learners create new ideas using knowledge and insights gained? Do learners analyze the credibility of information, authorial intent, and its appropriateness in meeting their needs? Do learners use information and the ideas of others to solve problems and make decisions as informed citizens? Do learners strive to see limitations and overlaps between multiple streams of information? Do learners gain new perspectives because of the texts they interact with? Do learners use tools to deepen understandings, to share ideas, and to build on others’ thinking? Do learners develop new skills strategies to meet the challenge of new texts and tools?

      These are the goals of digital literacy.

    1. The results of the questionnaire indicated that West Town students had greater access to the Internet at home and were required to use the Internet more in school. These results suggest that a separate and independent achievement gap existed for online reading, based on income inequality.

      The achievement gap is multifaceted, so as educators, we need to attack it in more ways. Getting children library cards (internet access) and technology experiences from a younger age can help close this gap, but only if it is in a equitable way.

  25. Jan 2020
    1. "It's not interactive, ... there's one screen, and you just have to read it," he explained. "It's the same as reading a [paper] page."

      sometimes tech isn't much of an improvement >> we need to channel to the special abilities of growing tech -hashtags, hyperlinks, interactive games and level checks, etc.

    2. That makes digital writing a potentially powerful lever for social good, allowing students to "actively participate in civic society and contribute to a vibrant, informed, and engaged community," as the ALA notes. It also makes digital writing a potentially dangerous tool—decisions about when and what to share online can have repercussions for a student's safety, privacy, and reputation.

      I love how digital literacy allows so many to have access to so much and to communicate easily with others. But there is a definite dark side to sharing in any digital format and many don't think about that.

  26. Nov 2019
    1. Digital Literacy Initiatives

      This website outlines digital literacy initiatives provided by the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS). The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) implements these intitatives to aid adult learners in the successful use of technology in their education and careers. Students have free access to learning material on different subjects under the "LINCS Learner Center" tab. Teachers and tutors also have access to resoruces on implementing educational technology for professional development and effective instruction. Rating 8/10

  27. Oct 2019
    1. "Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills."

      Definition of digital literacy.

  28. Sep 2019
    1. There is a growing need to establish literacies around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a foundational skill.

      Among both students AND instructors. Instructors teach what they know, and if they do not feel comfortable themselves working in these environments b/c they lack digital skills, then they will not encourage students to work openly.

    1. The learner’s key skills shift away from certainty and towards decision making between various options.

      from certainty to decision making - moving from simplicity to complexity, from knowing what to do to knowing ways to do things

  29. Aug 2019
    1. iteracy, which includes the abilities to apply to printed material critical analysis, inference and synthesis;

      How can this encompass digital literacy and non-printed texts; how does being literate change as the world of tech is constantly changing?

    1. Video Games (Is School Enough? Series)

      I love the idea for my students coding and creating games. I bought a robot to start getting students to code and start engaging in other ideas.

      I love the view the student has on feedback. Knowing what constructive criticism is really helpful is great growth-mindset. Using peers to give constructive criticism is a great way to help students out.

    1. Cultural Anthropologist Mimi Ito on Connected Learning, Children, and Digital Media

      This is a great question and a great start. I think teachers want o do this but do not know how or where to start. The question has been posed and I am sure little by little we will figure out how to do it.

  30. Jul 2019
    1. Interpretive Mode

      Good ideas for the World Language Classroom and a good opportunity to teach digital literacy skills, especially reading. Students can look for the information instead of the information just being handed to them.

    1. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008

      I completely agree with this. They can use the internet but they lack the skills to sift through information in a timely manner that does not make them give up in 10 seconds.

    2. One might even suggest that, over a lifetime, learning how to learn New Literacies is more important than learning a specific literacy of reading or writing.

      This is learning how to learn. When we learn how to learn we can figure out new technologies and we can problem solve

    1. five phases:
      1. students collaborative with instructor to pick area of interest and work on a DQ to guide their research.
      2. students engage in OCI as the do research and use digital tools to make discoveries 3.Students use critical thinking to evaluate online info by analyzing credibility of their info. 4.Students synthesize what they learned/researched by combining info in multiple, multimodal sources.
      3. Students engage in online content construction by putting their research into their own words and choosing the best digital tool/text before sharing their answers.
    2. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      IIQ helps students develop and craft web literacy by cultivating web knowledge and skills.

    1. Open learning, also known as open education

      requires a open, sharing, collaborative environment. Promotes pedagogical dialogue. OER have potential to transcend "geographic, economic, or language barriers". Also, OER strengthens digital literacy.

    1. Not teaching digital literacy along with language or other literacy instruction does our students a disservice. Nowadays, applying for a job or even filling in an online form to reserve a picnic table at a local park requires digital literacy skills.

      We must also not assume that others are teaching out students digital literacy. It is everyone's responsibility.

    1. Approachable and accessible to diverse audiences and their needs. The map needs to be written in a language that is easy to understand, and relevant—why do web literacy skills matter to them. Applicable to interest and/or expertise. The map needs to connect to curriculum, credentials, professional development, and other resources to teach people the skills they need to engage online and offline.

      I'm having trouble with what the internet literacy map is. Can anyone define?

    1. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      good summary quotation

  31. May 2019
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:48 - work within traditional media literacy and build on things that have worked for decades, but recognize what has changed and use the strengths of networked media
      • 1:05 - how do children check sources on the internet
      • 1:20 - one of the simplest ways is to follow the links back to the source
      • 1:34 - when it's a photo, you can do a reverse image search
      • 1:50 can do a news search and sort by date to see if the news story is current
      • 2:45 - misinformation campaigns happening - mixing genuine content with misinformation
      • 3:25 - some create alternate identities or fake accounts
      • 4:25 - important to get a sense of how reliable a source is
      • 4:35 - what is the purpose of the source and what is their business model? - is there accuracy and reliability in this, then likely will trust it as a source
      • 5:10 - impact that we don't get our news from a limited number of sources
      • 5:45 - some of these sources are from friends on social media, others are algorithmically determined
      • 6:08 - some advantages and disadvantages - the old model was news curated in a newspaper; new model has the potential of getting news we may not have gotten in the old model
      • 6:20 but in the old system you had gatekeeping and 'provenance'; in online news it's sometimes an effort to see where the information originates; gate keeping falls to us now
      • 7:05 we need to train young people to do this
      • 7:30 how should we teach this?
      • 7:35 - with the concept approach you don't need to feel like an expert
      • 7:40 - success teaching media literacy from the key concepts for three decades; begin from these
      • 7:52 - media are constructed;
      • 7:55 - they have commercial considerations;
      • 7:58 they have social and political implications;
      • 8:00 that audiences negotiate meaning;
      • 8:05 that each medium has a unique form and the form influences the content
      • 8:20 these can be applied to any form of media and adapted to any grade from K-12
      • 8:30 so the key concepts of digital literacy are paralleled and are in addition to those, they don't replace the original five concepts
      • 8:40 now have implications of digital literacies in that they are networked so we need to understand the idea of the network
      • 8:50 understand that content now is shareable, that this is the default rather than the exception
      • 8:55 - the ways the tools we use influence not just the content but the ways we use them
      • 9:05 - this has an impact, an ethical dimension
      • 9:10 - these can be applied in any context and to any grade level
      • 9:20 - we have a full digital literacy curriculum that we offer (speaking about Media Smarts Canada); it has lessons on seven different aspects that a teacher or school board can use
      • 9:45 - the value of the key concepts is teachers can modify these resources to their contexts
      • 9:50 - teachers have in those key concepts what is essentially a GUIDING STAR to understand what they are supposed to be achieving with these lessons
  32. Feb 2019
    1. Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneously presented information

      This is a lot. How do we currently do this? How is this successful?

    2. can’t be created

      There is a certain amount of empathy embedded in these, but I'd like to make it more explicit. We can weave in some thinking that "it's okay not to know everything." And, it's "okay to learn from others." And, it's okay to "not be perfect online."

      Carve out a space for learning, failure, exploration, growth.

    3. Do

      I like that most of these focus on process…as opposed to product. I still think they need to be revisited and remixed to capture my earlier note.

      Also thinking about issues of ownership, sharing, and IP online. This would call in a need for CC-licensing, open learning, OER, etc.

    4. global communities

      This ties in to the "ethical responsibilities" bullet below, but I think we've largely failed in this regard. I don't think of it as perhaps a failure, but we were a bit naive about the purpose and promise of tech use. I think the online social spaces have become a warzone, and these have been coopted by various groups. We need to do a better job educating, advocating, and empowering individuals to survive in these spaces.

    5. malleable

      get the multiple and dynamic…but what does malleable mean here?

      Of the three…this is the most interesting to me. Does it mean that we'll see opportunities for student work process/product be a bit more portable, transferrable, remixable? If so…sign me up. :)

    6. among members of particular groups

      Wondering how much a focus on "in the classroom" limits us as I believe most learning contexts in the future will be outside of traditional classroom settings. Also thinking about power structures in these contexts.

    7. continued evolution

      Wondering how far we (and NCTE) would like to push/advocate for "evolution" of curriculum, assessment, & teaching. I've been thinking lately (as per guidance from Gerber & Lynch) that we need to really problematize and reinvent these elements. Thinking about more digitally native pedagogies (and assessments, practices, etc.) as opposed to digitizing the traditional.

      An example would be considerations of computational thinking/participation in theoretical perspectives, or authentic assessments using API data or a tool like Hypothesis.

  33. Dec 2018
  34. Nov 2018
    1. Cynicism is a bigger problem than gullibility. Too many people doubt everything in the news, regardless of the source.

    1. An online discussion about screen time and its connections with digital literacy and creativity. Hosted by Drs. W. Ian O'Byrne and Kristen Hawley Turner.

    1. Digital Promise

      Digital promise website serves millions of underserved adults in the United States by offering educational resources via technology. With personalized learning and individual pathways, they stand a chance to advance in their careers and lives.

      The site has a network of educators and developers who contribute to the "Beacon Project". As part of this project, the site includes resources across the country that help with support and access to education.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. LINCS is a national leadership initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) to expand evidence-based practice in the field of adult education. LINCS demonstrates OCTAE’s commitment to delivering high-quality, on-demand educational opportunities to practitioners of adult education, so those practitioners can help adult learners successfully transition to postsecondary education and 21st century jobs.

      The LINCS website has an abundance of information that can prove useful in the designing of adult educational materials which are technology based. The site includes courses, articles and links 743 research studies, materials and products. In addition there are State Resources for Adult Education and Literacy Professional Development. Overall I found the site to be a wonderful source of relevant information to tap into.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  35. Oct 2018
    1. When students are shown quick techniques for judging the veracity of a news source, they will use them. Regardless of their existing beliefs, they will distinguish good sources from bad sources.

      https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com/

  36. Sep 2018
    1. But you can see how other editorial dynamic insertion frameworks can be designed and executed. For example, in theory, the tech allows for better targeting, and as such, if you could reliably identify the location of a listener, you could deliver editorial programming or journalistic information to that person specific to her city, town, or state

      There's a lot of power inherent in this and we are wise to pay attention to how that power is used. Will we observe it deployed for good? Will the exercise of these powers be intentional and self-aware? Will average users have agency in determining how technology like this impacts them? Will average users even be afforded awareness of when they are impacted?

      As emergent as Information Literacy is as a concept and societal imperative, it will be a steep challenge to keep up with rapid technological evolutions like this in order to empower us as content consumers to at least possess awareness around how and why we are targeted.

  37. Aug 2018
    1. Representation of Digital Intelligence

      I wonder if the similarity to a pie chart hints a message that the components are all equal. The use of the color spectrum also says something about continuity and adjacency which may not be intended. But it looks nice.

  38. Jul 2018
    1. Make it a policy to always teach a new technology, with new literacies, to your weakest reader(s) first. This enables struggling readers and writers to become literate in this new technology before other, higher-performing students in reading. Those who struggle with reading and writing become literate in a new literacy before others and can teach this new literacy to others who are not literate with this new form. This is a powerful principle that positions weaker readers as experts

      This is an interesting proposal as it allows for students to gain more confidence in another area of literacy. I think it is important to note that it might be just as difficult, however, because reading and writing skills are taken to a new level. It may also persuade struggling students to rely more on digital literacy skills and abandon traditional reading and writing skills as "not for them" or "too difficult." I'd love to see if this method is as successful as it is presented to be!

    2. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008).

      Students can navigate, but are not "digitally literate," still don't follow concepts of appropriate use

    3. print out enough copies of the first page of search results for each student. Dis-tribute these. Then see if students can locate the best link on the search results page for each question that you ask such as, “Which link will take you to a site developed by an Egyptologist?”

      Good example ACTIVITY to help students develop digital literacy

    4. Make it a policy to always teach a new technology, with new literacies, to your weakest reader(s) first

      Great point! Bringing the weaker readers (in digital literacy) is a good starting point in classrooms

    5. Thus, when we speak of New Literacies in an online age we mean that literacy is not just “new” today; it becomes “new” every day of our lives.

      Good point- "updates" really do require new skills and knowledge to be able to work. This statement really explains the urgency of being able to re-work and learn ever-changing technologies.

    1. The Teaching Tolerance Digital Literacy Framework offers seven key areas in which students need support developing digital and civic literacy skills. The numbered items represent the overarching knowledge and skills that make up the framework. The bullets represent more granular examples of student behaviors to help educators evaluate mastery.

      Digital Literacy Framework of Points

    1. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Both must be present for learning and growing

    2. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Digital skills involve knowing how to execute tasks on the computer. Digital Literacy involves searching and analyzing deeper into content in order to apply appropriate criteria.

    1. Ian O’Byrne, an assistant professor of education at the College of Charleston, wrote, “As an educator and researcher who studies these digital places and tools, I’m in front of screens a lot. I experiment and play in these spaces. I’m also writing and researching the impact of these screens and their impact on the well-being of others as it relates to children and adolescents. The problem in this is that one of the other hats that I wear is as a parent and husband. I am not only critical of my engagement and use of these digital technologies, but I’m also cautious/cognizant of their role as a mediator in my relationships with my children and significant other. These screens and digital tools play a strong role in our lives and interactions in and out of our home. In our home we have screens and devices all over the place. We have a video server that is ready to serve content to any one of these screens on demand. We have voice-assistive devices listening and waiting for our commands. I believe it is important as an educator and researcher to play with and examine how these devices are playing a role in our lives, so I can bring this work to others. Even with these opportunities, I’m still struck by times when technology seems too intrusive. This is plainly evident when I’m sitting with my family and watching a television show together, and I’m gazing off into my device reading my RSS feed for the day. Previously I would enjoy watching the funniest home videos and laughing together. Now, I am distant. The first thing in the morning when I’m driving my kids in to school and stop at a red light, previously I would enjoy the time to stop, listen to the radio, look at the clouds or bumper stickers on cars around me. Now, I pull out the phone to see if I received a notification in the last 20 minutes. When I call out for the voice-activated device in my home to play some music or ask a question, my request is quickly echoed by my 2-year-old who is just learning to talk. She is echoing these conversations I’m having with an artificial intelligence. I’m trying to weigh this all out in my mind and figure what it means for us personally. The professional understanding may come later.”
  39. May 2018
  40. Apr 2018
    1. What can we build that would allow people to 1.) annotate terms of service related to tools they adopt in a classroom? and 2.) see an aggregated list of all current annotations. Last, if we were to start critically analyzing EdTech Terms of Service, what questions should we even ask?

  41. Nov 2017
    1. realize that the web was not something that happened to them but they were happening to
    2. understanding how Web applications work “under the hood” and how databases and scripts interact

      Reminds me of a Web version of the Raspberry Pi approach to digital making.

    3. considering the interplay between design and content
    4. organizing and architecting an online space
  42. Aug 2017
  43. Jul 2017
  44. Jun 2017
  45. Apr 2017
  46. hapgood.us hapgood.us