116 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. "Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills."

      Definition of digital literacy.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. There is a growing need to establish literacies around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a foundational skill.

      Among both students AND instructors. Instructors teach what they know, and if they do not feel comfortable themselves working in these environments b/c they lack digital skills, then they will not encourage students to work openly.

    1. The learner’s key skills shift away from certainty and towards decision making between various options.

      from certainty to decision making - moving from simplicity to complexity, from knowing what to do to knowing ways to do things

  3. Aug 2019
    1. iteracy, which includes the abilities to apply to printed material critical analysis, inference and synthesis;

      How can this encompass digital literacy and non-printed texts; how does being literate change as the world of tech is constantly changing?

    1. Video Games (Is School Enough? Series)

      I love the idea for my students coding and creating games. I bought a robot to start getting students to code and start engaging in other ideas.

      I love the view the student has on feedback. Knowing what constructive criticism is really helpful is great growth-mindset. Using peers to give constructive criticism is a great way to help students out.

    1. Cultural Anthropologist Mimi Ito on Connected Learning, Children, and Digital Media

      This is a great question and a great start. I think teachers want o do this but do not know how or where to start. The question has been posed and I am sure little by little we will figure out how to do it.

  4. Jul 2019
    1. Interpretive Mode

      Good ideas for the World Language Classroom and a good opportunity to teach digital literacy skills, especially reading. Students can look for the information instead of the information just being handed to them.

    1. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008

      I completely agree with this. They can use the internet but they lack the skills to sift through information in a timely manner that does not make them give up in 10 seconds.

    2. One might even suggest that, over a lifetime, learning how to learn New Literacies is more important than learning a specific literacy of reading or writing.

      This is learning how to learn. When we learn how to learn we can figure out new technologies and we can problem solve

    1. five phases:
      1. students collaborative with instructor to pick area of interest and work on a DQ to guide their research.
      2. students engage in OCI as the do research and use digital tools to make discoveries 3.Students use critical thinking to evaluate online info by analyzing credibility of their info. 4.Students synthesize what they learned/researched by combining info in multiple, multimodal sources.
      3. Students engage in online content construction by putting their research into their own words and choosing the best digital tool/text before sharing their answers.
    2. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      IIQ helps students develop and craft web literacy by cultivating web knowledge and skills.

    1. Open learning, also known as open education

      requires a open, sharing, collaborative environment. Promotes pedagogical dialogue. OER have potential to transcend "geographic, economic, or language barriers". Also, OER strengthens digital literacy.

    1. Not teaching digital literacy along with language or other literacy instruction does our students a disservice. Nowadays, applying for a job or even filling in an online form to reserve a picnic table at a local park requires digital literacy skills.

      We must also not assume that others are teaching out students digital literacy. It is everyone's responsibility.

    1. Approachable and accessible to diverse audiences and their needs. The map needs to be written in a language that is easy to understand, and relevant—why do web literacy skills matter to them. Applicable to interest and/or expertise. The map needs to connect to curriculum, credentials, professional development, and other resources to teach people the skills they need to engage online and offline.

      I'm having trouble with what the internet literacy map is. Can anyone define?

    1. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      good summary quotation

  5. May 2019
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:48 - work within traditional media literacy and build on things that have worked for decades, but recognize what has changed and use the strengths of networked media
      • 1:05 - how do children check sources on the internet
      • 1:20 - one of the simplest ways is to follow the links back to the source
      • 1:34 - when it's a photo, you can do a reverse image search
      • 1:50 can do a news search and sort by date to see if the news story is current
      • 2:45 - misinformation campaigns happening - mixing genuine content with misinformation
      • 3:25 - some create alternate identities or fake accounts
      • 4:25 - important to get a sense of how reliable a source is
      • 4:35 - what is the purpose of the source and what is their business model? - is there accuracy and reliability in this, then likely will trust it as a source
      • 5:10 - impact that we don't get our news from a limited number of sources
      • 5:45 - some of these sources are from friends on social media, others are algorithmically determined
      • 6:08 - some advantages and disadvantages - the old model was news curated in a newspaper; new model has the potential of getting news we may not have gotten in the old model
      • 6:20 but in the old system you had gatekeeping and 'provenance'; in online news it's sometimes an effort to see where the information originates; gate keeping falls to us now
      • 7:05 we need to train young people to do this
      • 7:30 how should we teach this?
      • 7:35 - with the concept approach you don't need to feel like an expert
      • 7:40 - success teaching media literacy from the key concepts for three decades; begin from these
      • 7:52 - media are constructed;
      • 7:55 - they have commercial considerations;
      • 7:58 they have social and political implications;
      • 8:00 that audiences negotiate meaning;
      • 8:05 that each medium has a unique form and the form influences the content
      • 8:20 these can be applied to any form of media and adapted to any grade from K-12
      • 8:30 so the key concepts of digital literacy are paralleled and are in addition to those, they don't replace the original five concepts
      • 8:40 now have implications of digital literacies in that they are networked so we need to understand the idea of the network
      • 8:50 understand that content now is shareable, that this is the default rather than the exception
      • 8:55 - the ways the tools we use influence not just the content but the ways we use them
      • 9:05 - this has an impact, an ethical dimension
      • 9:10 - these can be applied in any context and to any grade level
      • 9:20 - we have a full digital literacy curriculum that we offer (speaking about Media Smarts Canada); it has lessons on seven different aspects that a teacher or school board can use
      • 9:45 - the value of the key concepts is teachers can modify these resources to their contexts
      • 9:50 - teachers have in those key concepts what is essentially a GUIDING STAR to understand what they are supposed to be achieving with these lessons
  6. Feb 2019
    1. Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneously presented information

      This is a lot. How do we currently do this? How is this successful?

    2. can’t be created

      There is a certain amount of empathy embedded in these, but I'd like to make it more explicit. We can weave in some thinking that "it's okay not to know everything." And, it's "okay to learn from others." And, it's okay to "not be perfect online."

      Carve out a space for learning, failure, exploration, growth.

    3. Do

      I like that most of these focus on process…as opposed to product. I still think they need to be revisited and remixed to capture my earlier note.

      Also thinking about issues of ownership, sharing, and IP online. This would call in a need for CC-licensing, open learning, OER, etc.

    4. global communities

      This ties in to the "ethical responsibilities" bullet below, but I think we've largely failed in this regard. I don't think of it as perhaps a failure, but we were a bit naive about the purpose and promise of tech use. I think the online social spaces have become a warzone, and these have been coopted by various groups. We need to do a better job educating, advocating, and empowering individuals to survive in these spaces.

    5. malleable

      get the multiple and dynamic…but what does malleable mean here?

      Of the three…this is the most interesting to me. Does it mean that we'll see opportunities for student work process/product be a bit more portable, transferrable, remixable? If so…sign me up. :)

    6. among members of particular groups

      Wondering how much a focus on "in the classroom" limits us as I believe most learning contexts in the future will be outside of traditional classroom settings. Also thinking about power structures in these contexts.

    7. continued evolution

      Wondering how far we (and NCTE) would like to push/advocate for "evolution" of curriculum, assessment, & teaching. I've been thinking lately (as per guidance from Gerber & Lynch) that we need to really problematize and reinvent these elements. Thinking about more digitally native pedagogies (and assessments, practices, etc.) as opposed to digitizing the traditional.

      An example would be considerations of computational thinking/participation in theoretical perspectives, or authentic assessments using API data or a tool like Hypothesis.

  7. Dec 2018
  8. Nov 2018
    1. Cynicism is a bigger problem than gullibility. Too many people doubt everything in the news, regardless of the source.

    1. An online discussion about screen time and its connections with digital literacy and creativity. Hosted by Drs. W. Ian O'Byrne and Kristen Hawley Turner.

    1. Digital Promise

      Digital promise website serves millions of underserved adults in the United States by offering educational resources via technology. With personalized learning and individual pathways, they stand a chance to advance in their careers and lives.

      The site has a network of educators and developers who contribute to the "Beacon Project". As part of this project, the site includes resources across the country that help with support and access to education.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. LINCS is a national leadership initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) to expand evidence-based practice in the field of adult education. LINCS demonstrates OCTAE’s commitment to delivering high-quality, on-demand educational opportunities to practitioners of adult education, so those practitioners can help adult learners successfully transition to postsecondary education and 21st century jobs.

      The LINCS website has an abundance of information that can prove useful in the designing of adult educational materials which are technology based. The site includes courses, articles and links 743 research studies, materials and products. In addition there are State Resources for Adult Education and Literacy Professional Development. Overall I found the site to be a wonderful source of relevant information to tap into.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  9. Oct 2018
    1. When students are shown quick techniques for judging the veracity of a news source, they will use them. Regardless of their existing beliefs, they will distinguish good sources from bad sources.

      https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com/

  10. Sep 2018
    1. But you can see how other editorial dynamic insertion frameworks can be designed and executed. For example, in theory, the tech allows for better targeting, and as such, if you could reliably identify the location of a listener, you could deliver editorial programming or journalistic information to that person specific to her city, town, or state

      There's a lot of power inherent in this and we are wise to pay attention to how that power is used. Will we observe it deployed for good? Will the exercise of these powers be intentional and self-aware? Will average users have agency in determining how technology like this impacts them? Will average users even be afforded awareness of when they are impacted?

      As emergent as Information Literacy is as a concept and societal imperative, it will be a steep challenge to keep up with rapid technological evolutions like this in order to empower us as content consumers to at least possess awareness around how and why we are targeted.

  11. Aug 2018
    1. Representation of Digital Intelligence

      I wonder if the similarity to a pie chart hints a message that the components are all equal. The use of the color spectrum also says something about continuity and adjacency which may not be intended. But it looks nice.

  12. Jul 2018
    1. Make it a policy to always teach a new technology, with new literacies, to your weakest reader(s) first. This enables struggling readers and writers to become literate in this new technology before other, higher-performing students in reading. Those who struggle with reading and writing become literate in a new literacy before others and can teach this new literacy to others who are not literate with this new form. This is a powerful principle that positions weaker readers as experts

      This is an interesting proposal as it allows for students to gain more confidence in another area of literacy. I think it is important to note that it might be just as difficult, however, because reading and writing skills are taken to a new level. It may also persuade struggling students to rely more on digital literacy skills and abandon traditional reading and writing skills as "not for them" or "too difficult." I'd love to see if this method is as successful as it is presented to be!

    2. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008).

      Students can navigate, but are not "digitally literate," still don't follow concepts of appropriate use

    3. print out enough copies of the first page of search results for each student. Dis-tribute these. Then see if students can locate the best link on the search results page for each question that you ask such as, “Which link will take you to a site developed by an Egyptologist?”

      Good example ACTIVITY to help students develop digital literacy

    4. Make it a policy to always teach a new technology, with new literacies, to your weakest reader(s) first

      Great point! Bringing the weaker readers (in digital literacy) is a good starting point in classrooms

    5. Thus, when we speak of New Literacies in an online age we mean that literacy is not just “new” today; it becomes “new” every day of our lives.

      Good point- "updates" really do require new skills and knowledge to be able to work. This statement really explains the urgency of being able to re-work and learn ever-changing technologies.

    1. The Teaching Tolerance Digital Literacy Framework offers seven key areas in which students need support developing digital and civic literacy skills. The numbered items represent the overarching knowledge and skills that make up the framework. The bullets represent more granular examples of student behaviors to help educators evaluate mastery.

      Digital Literacy Framework of Points

    1. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Both must be present for learning and growing

    2. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Digital skills involve knowing how to execute tasks on the computer. Digital Literacy involves searching and analyzing deeper into content in order to apply appropriate criteria.

    1. Ian O’Byrne, an assistant professor of education at the College of Charleston, wrote, “As an educator and researcher who studies these digital places and tools, I’m in front of screens a lot. I experiment and play in these spaces. I’m also writing and researching the impact of these screens and their impact on the well-being of others as it relates to children and adolescents. The problem in this is that one of the other hats that I wear is as a parent and husband. I am not only critical of my engagement and use of these digital technologies, but I’m also cautious/cognizant of their role as a mediator in my relationships with my children and significant other. These screens and digital tools play a strong role in our lives and interactions in and out of our home. In our home we have screens and devices all over the place. We have a video server that is ready to serve content to any one of these screens on demand. We have voice-assistive devices listening and waiting for our commands. I believe it is important as an educator and researcher to play with and examine how these devices are playing a role in our lives, so I can bring this work to others. Even with these opportunities, I’m still struck by times when technology seems too intrusive. This is plainly evident when I’m sitting with my family and watching a television show together, and I’m gazing off into my device reading my RSS feed for the day. Previously I would enjoy watching the funniest home videos and laughing together. Now, I am distant. The first thing in the morning when I’m driving my kids in to school and stop at a red light, previously I would enjoy the time to stop, listen to the radio, look at the clouds or bumper stickers on cars around me. Now, I pull out the phone to see if I received a notification in the last 20 minutes. When I call out for the voice-activated device in my home to play some music or ask a question, my request is quickly echoed by my 2-year-old who is just learning to talk. She is echoing these conversations I’m having with an artificial intelligence. I’m trying to weigh this all out in my mind and figure what it means for us personally. The professional understanding may come later.”
  13. May 2018
  14. Apr 2018
    1. What can we build that would allow people to 1.) annotate terms of service related to tools they adopt in a classroom? and 2.) see an aggregated list of all current annotations. Last, if we were to start critically analyzing EdTech Terms of Service, what questions should we even ask?

  15. Nov 2017
    1. realize that the web was not something that happened to them but they were happening to
    2. understanding how Web applications work “under the hood” and how databases and scripts interact

      Reminds me of a Web version of the Raspberry Pi approach to digital making.

    3. considering the interplay between design and content
    4. organizing and architecting an online space
  16. Aug 2017
  17. Jul 2017
  18. Jun 2017
  19. Apr 2017
    1. Digital Literacy and all those other literacies

      So where's the false binary here? For me it's the idea that digital literacy is all that different from the same kind of literacy that educators have been talking about since weel before the invention of the computer.

      This makes sense for me personally as a PhD in English who was always fascinated by the Internet and digital technology and who now finds himself working in the educational software industry.

  20. Mar 2017
    1. a principle of “organizing the world’s information” has to be separating reliable sources from unreliable ones, and trying to provide answers that are true. It’s clear that in many cases that’s not happening. The snippets, which create the impression of a definitive answer while feeding people bad science, conspiracy, and hate speech, make matters worse.

      Google has become dangerous.

  21. Feb 2017
    1. publisher Tim O’Reilly, who recently published an article on how he vets news online.  It’s very useful, actually, listing a series of practical tips, from looking for references to checking out other links on the same topic.

      This sounds like Jon Udell's digital tool kit.

    2. publisher Tim O’Reilly, who recently published an article on how he vets news online.  It’s very useful, actually, listing a series of practical tips, from looking for references to checking out other links on the same topic.

      This sounds like Jon Udell's digital tool kit.

  22. Jan 2017
    1. never mind that fake news is neither new (forgery, quackery, and conspiracy theorizing are not recent inventions) nor exclusively right-leaning. The new form it has taken in readily sharable social media, however, has made it easy for conventional media to excuse themselves from responsibility for how the election was covered.

      "Fake news" was a small factor, compared to mainstream media treating Trump as a legitimate candidate, and sensationalizing hacked emails that contained nothing significant.

    1. But students are arriving with some well established digital practices of their own

      Students can also be included as teachers when it comes to digital technologies

    1. Did Media Literacy Backfire?

      Media literacy asks people to raise questions and be wary of information that they’re receiving. People are. Unfortunately, that’s exactly why we’re talking past one another.

      ...

      Addressing so-called fake news is going to require a lot more than labeling. It’s going to require a cultural change about how we make sense of information, whom we trust, and how we understand our own role in grappling with information.

  23. Dec 2016
    1. Mike Caulfield walks through using Google image search for a fact check.

      Apparently, Richard Nixon did write a short letter to Trump in 1987, saying that his wife thought Trump would do well if he ran for office.

      I wonder how Nixon would have reacted to Trump's phone call with the president of Taiwan.

    1. Mike Caulfield points out that "digital literacy" needs to include solid knowledge of the Web and how to use it, such as search techniques and uses of specific websites. Principles of site evaluation are not enough.

    1. The Web has become an insidious propaganda tool. To fight it, digital literacy education must rise beyond technical proficiency to include wisdom.

      • Double-check every claim before you share.
      • Be wary of casual scrolling.<br> Everything you see affects your attitudes.
      • Don't automatically disbelieve the surreal (or unpleasant).
      • Do not exaggerate your own claims.
      • Be prepared to repeat the truth over and over.
      • Curate good resources, and share updates to them.
        • It will reinforce the previous information.
        • it will boost search engine rankings of the collection.
    2. This is more than traditional information literacy

      I would say that this is information literacy. Traditionally, we have promoted a rather narrow view of IL, which is part of the problem.The ACRL Framework may be a step in the right direction.

    1. creating a video, podcast, or website for a class assignment, developing data visualizations, mapping data, making a prototype for an engineering or art class, collecting, locating, and analyzing data, or conducting interviews

      Librarians should work at developing some expertise in these areas, so that we can provide advice and assistance as well as space.

  24. Nov 2016
    1. I avoid putting my students in high-risk situations, but this does not mean avoiding teaching digital literacy.

      This is something important to consider especially since I teach journalism. By default students need to learn how to deal with public comments. We try to ease into this arena of writing in a public space and avoiding controversy.

    2. Digital skills would focus on which tool to use (e.g., Twitter) and how to use it (e.g., how to tweet, retweet, use TweetDeck), while digital literacy would include in-depth questions

      I define digital skills as knowing how to work a kind of technology, whereas digital literacy is the knowledge of how a kind of technology works. One is not better than the other, however. If someone or some group wants to accomplish a goal using technology, they're going to need both literacy and skill. Having little skill with a lot of literacy would be like knowing how a car engine works on a technical scale, but not being able to fix it if your car broke down. Having little literacy with a lot of skill would be like having a bad teacher for a subject. They understand the material, perhaps even demonstrate mastery, but they cannot teach their knowledge to others because of the communication gap.

    3. reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

    4. reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities

      This leads to digital inclusion as opposed to digital divide. Digital divide assumes that information is only accessible to certain areas/certain "categories" of users.

    5. in-depth questions

      Access, skills, motivation, and engagement with content

    6. Digital literacies are not solely about technical proficiency but about the issues, norms, and habits of mind surrounding technologies used for a particular purpos

      people often fall in the trap of focusing on technical aspects and skills. Spreading awareness about contextual placement of technologies (ex: pedagogies) is key

    7. norms, and habits

      Key dimension sadly overlooked in conversations about digital literacies. This requires cultural change.

    1. relationship between literacy and documenting learning

      Interesting! I normally think of literacy as more of an act of consumption and now she is challenging my thinking to expand to include documenting (and curating?!?!) as anessential element of literacy.

  25. Sep 2016
  26. Jul 2016
    1. Beetham and Sharpe ‘pyramid model’ of digital literacy development model (2010)

      like this model and the progression it represents. It might be interesting to compare it to imposter syndrome. Identity represents a level of confidence in one's abilities, confidence which can be independent of ability level.

    2. What it means to be digitally literate changes over time and across contexts, so digital literacies are essentially a set of academic and professional situated practices supported by diverse and changing technologies
  27. Jun 2016
    1. Find and vet information online. In the digital world, being able to not only find information online but also determine its quality and validity is crucial.

      Vetting could be done through annotation/bookmarking.

    2. Some people have argued that widespread literacy (understood as reading at an eighth-grade level) was about making sure factory workers could read manuals well enough to keep machines running, rather than about providing for an informed citizenry. The equivalent for digital literacy would be to define it simply as being able to learn software quickly. Instead, digital literacy should be defined as knowing the effective practices suited to the dominant media. We should not teach students just the skills that will prepare them to follow instructions or quickly comprehend a user interface; instead we should aim to help students develop the expertise that will allow them to combine and create technologies to develop new and dynamic solutions. Just as traditional literacy and the liberal arts have been the key to independence since the advent of public schooling, digital literacy today is about intellectual freedom (see figure 1).

      Very interesting.

    3. Despite having grown up with access to an increasing amount of technology, students now need to learn how to use technology to solve problems in academic and professional settings.

      So "digital native" is not enough. Digital literacy is something different, something more.

    4. The people who were comfortable at this humanities-technology intersection helped to create the human-machine symbiosis that is at the core of this story. Walter Isaacson, "The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution" (2014)

      Great line!

    5. Design and create digital solutions. Ultimately students should build a skill set that allows them to develop or customize their own digital tools. This does not necessarily mean that students need to be able to write their own applications from scratch. Rather, they should be comfortable customizing and combining tools to create a complete solution—for example, creating a web-form to automate the collection of customer evaluations and then outputting the results to a spreadsheet for analysis.

      Is this an argument against online learning as a "management" problem?

    6. Resistance, however, is as futile

  28. May 2016
  29. Apr 2016
    1. Does the average high school or college graduate know where the alphabet comes from, something of its development, and anything about its psychic and social effects? Does he or she know anything about illuminated manuscripts, about the origin of the printing press and its role in reshaping Western culture, about the origins of newspapers and magazines? Do our students know where clocks, telescopes, microscopes, X rays, and computers come from? Do they have any idea about how such technologies have changed the economic, social, and political life of Western culture?

      What are the "Six Big Questions" regarding digital literacy and digital citizenship? (See http://azwaldo.com/wordpress/the-interface-layer/ )

  30. Mar 2016
  31. Feb 2016
  32. Oct 2015
    1. First I review the benefits of learning in the open to build a web presence.

      What is your favorite phrase to describe what this process is (e.t. digital identity, open learning, digital literacy, etc.)?

  33. Jul 2015
  34. May 2014
    1. Personally, I think Digital Humanities is about building things,” said Ramsay in a polarizing talk at the MLA convention in 2011, printed in Defining Digital Humanities. Unlike many theorists, however, he was willing to make this demand concrete: “Do you have to know how to code? I’m a tenured professor of digital humanities and I say ‘yes.’ ”