370 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Projects like the Open Journal System, Manifold or Scalar are based on a distributed model that allow anyone to download and deploy the software (Maxwell et al., 2019), offering an alternative to the commercial entities that dominate the scholarly communication ecosystem.

      Might Hypothes.is also be included with this list? Though it could go a bit further toward packaging and making it more easily available to self-hosters.

    1. Navigate to a webpage that you would like to annotate. Make sure the Chrome extension is activated – if it’s not, click the greyed-out button in your toolbar:

      my first note in the web

  2. May 2022
    1. Nate Angell as our new Director of Communications and Community.

      Congratulations Nate! I'm sure Hypothes.is will miss you desperately, but Creative Commons will be all the better for your work and contribution.

      https://creativecommons.org/2022/05/03/cc-welcomes-nate-angell/

  3. Apr 2022
    1. https://winnielim.org/library/collections/personal-websites-with-a-notes-section/

      Winnie has some excellent examples of people's websites with notes, similar to that of https://indieweb.org/note. But it feels a bit like she's approaching it from the perspective of deeper ideas and thoughts than one might post to Twitter or other social media. It would be worthwhile looking at examples of people's practices in this space that are more akin to note taking and idea building, perhaps in the vein of creating digital gardens or the use of annotation tools like Hypothes.is?

    1. We have to endlessly scroll and parse a ton of images and headlines before we can find something interesting to read.

      The randomness of interesting tidbits in a social media scroll help to put us in a state of flow. We get small hits of dopamine from finding interesting posts to fill in the gaps of the boring bits in between and suddenly find we've lost the day. As a result an endless scroll of varying quality might have the effect of making one feel productive when in fact a reasonably large proportion of your time is spent on useless and uninteresting content.

      This effect may be put even further out when it's done algorithmically and the dopamine hits become more frequent. Potentially worse than this, the depth of the insight found in most social feeds is very shallow and rarely ever deep. One is almost never invited to delve further to find new insights.


      How might a social media stream of content be leveraged to help people read more interesting and complex content? Could putting Jacques Derrida's texts into a social media-like framing create this? Then one could reply to the text by sentence or paragraph with their own notes. This is similar to the user interface of Hypothes.is, but Hypothes.is has a more traditional reading interface compared to the social media space. What if one interspersed multiple authors in short threads? What other methods might work to "trick" the human mind into having more fun and finding flow in their deeper and more engaged reading states?

      Link this to the idea of fun in Sönke Ahrens' How to Take Smart Notes.

    1. I’ll also note that there’s the potential of a reply on Hypothes.is to a prior reply to a canonical URL source. In that case it could be either marked up as a reply to the “parent” on Hypothesis and/or a reply to the canonical source URL, or even both so that webmentions could be sent further upstream.

      You can also "reply" by annotating the standalone (/a/...) page for a given annotation.

    2. Webmention functioning properly will require this canonical URL to exist on the page to be able to send notifications and have them be received properly

      It's also just annoying when trying to get at the original resource (or its URL for reference).

    3. all the data on this particular page seems to be rendered using JavaScript rather than being raw HTML
    4. I suspect that a reasonable WordPress user could probably set up a free Hypothes.is account and use the RSS feed from it (something like https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=username) to create an IFTTT.com recipe to post it as a public/draft to their WordPress website.

      This is a note. With an linked video

    5. I created a video overview/walkthrough of how I take highlights and annotations on Hypothes.isHypothes.is and feed them through to my WordPress Website using RSS and IFTTT.com.
    6. What follows may tend toward the jargon-y end of programming, but I’ll endeavor to explain it all and go step-by-step to allow those with little or no programming experience to follow along and use the tools I’m describing in a very powerful way.  I’ll do my best to link the jargon to definitions and examples for those who haven’t run across them before. Hopefully with a bit of explanation, the ability to cut and paste some code, or even make some basic modifications, you’ll be able to do what I and others have done, but without having to puzzle it all out from scratch.

      This is a note.

    1. The bookitself participates in the history it recounts: it has a title page, table of contents,footnotes, a bibliography and an index to assist the reader, while the digitalcopy enables the reader to search for individual words and phrases as well asto copy-and-paste without disfiguring a material object.

      Some scholars study annotations as part of material culture. Are they leaving out too much by solely studying those physically left in the books about which they were made, or should we instead also be looking at other sources like commonplace books, notebooks, note cards, digital spaces like e-readers that allow annotation, social media where texts are discussed, or even digital marginalia in services like Hypothes.is or Perusall?

      Some of these forms of annotation allow a digital version of cut and paste which doesn't cause damage to the original text, which should be thought of as a good thing though it may separate the annotations from the original physical object.

    1. You need to be in the triplescripts.org group to see this annotation.

      Membership is semi-private, but only as a consequence of current limitations of the Hypothes.is service.

      A copy of this annotation has been published in the Hypothes.is Public stream, which explains in detail that anyone is permitted to join.

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    Annotators

    1. Ton has asked some good questions about social annotation using @Hypothes_is. I've annotated with some of my ideas. I'm also curious what others' practices look like.

      https://twitter.com/ton_zylstra/status/1513219186524368896

      Come give your answers in the margins: https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2022/04/three-questions-about-annotating-in-hypothesis/


      syndication links: - twitter - zylstra.org

    2. https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2022/04/three-questions-about-annotating-in-hypothesis/

      Thanks for asking these questions Ton! I've been meaning to spend some time writing up my use cases and methods for this for a while, and your questions have created a scaffold for getting a large chunk of it done in some bite sized pieces. Now I should be able to roll up my answers into an article, do some light editing and be on my way.

    3. 3. Who are you annotating with? Learning usually needs a certain degree of protection, a safe space. Groups can provide that, but public space often less so. In Hypothes.is who are you annotating with? Everybody? Specific groups of learners? Just yourself and one or two others? All of that, depending on the text you’re annotating? How granular is your control over the sharing with groups, so that you can choose your level of learning safety?

      This is a great question and I ask it frequently with many different answers.

      I've not seen specific numbers, but I suspect that the majority of Hypothes.is users are annotating in small private groups/classes using their learning management system (LMS) integrations through their university. As a result, using it and hoping for a big social experience is going to be discouraging for most.

      Of course this doesn't mean that no one is out there. After all, here you are following my RSS feed of annotations and asking these questions!

      I'd say that 95+% or more of my annotations are ultimately for my own learning and ends. If others stumble upon them and find them interesting, then great! But I'm not really here for them.

      As more people have begun using Hypothes.is over the past few years I have slowly but surely run into people hiding in the margins of texts and quietly interacted with them and begun to know some of them. Often they're also on Twitter or have their own websites too which only adds to the social glue. It has been one of the slowest social media experiences I've ever had (even in comparison to old school blogging where discovery is much higher in general use). There has been a small uptick (anecdotally) in Hypothes.is use by some in the note taking application space (Obsidian, Roam Research, Logseq, etc.), so I've seen some of them from time to time.

      I can only think of one time in the last five or so years in which I happened to be "in a text" and a total stranger was coincidentally reading and annotating at the same time. There have been a few times I've specifically been in a shared text with a small group annotating simultaneously. Other than this it's all been asynchronous experiences.

      There are a few people working at some of the social side of Hypothes.is if you're searching for it, though even their Hypothes.is presences may seem as sparse as your own at present @tonz.

      Some examples:

      @peterhagen Has built an alternate interface for the main Hypothes.is feed that adds some additional discovery dimensions you might find interesting. It highlights some frequent annotators and provide a more visual feed of what's happening on the public Hypothes.is timeline as well as data from HackerNews.

      @flancian maintains anagora.org, which is like a planet of wikis and related applications, where he keeps a list of annotations on Hypothes.is by members of the collective at https://anagora.org/latest

      @tomcritchlow has experimented with using Hypothes.is as a "traditional" comments section on his personal website.

      @remikalir has a nice little tool https://crowdlaaers.org/ for looking at documents with lots of annotations.

      Right now, I'm also in an Obsidian-based book club run by Dan Allosso in which some of us are actively annotating the two books using Hypothes.is and dovetailing some of this with activity in a shared Obsidian vault. see: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/24/55803196/. While there is a small private group for our annotations a few of us are still annotating the books in public. Perhaps if I had a group of people who were heavily interested in keeping a group going on a regular basis, I might find the value in it, but until then public is better and I'm more likely to come across and see more of what's happening out there.

      I've got a collection of odd Hypothes.is related quirks, off label use cases, and experiments: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/ including a list of those I frequently follow: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

      Like good annotations and notes, you've got to put some work into finding the social portion what's happening in this fun little space. My best recommendation to find your "tribe" is to do some targeted tag searches in their search box to see who's annotating things in which you're interested.

    4. 2. What influence does annotating with an audience have on how you annotate? My annotations and notes generally are fragile things, tentative formulations, or shortened formulations that have meaning because of what they point to (in my network of notes and thoughts), not so much because of their wording. Likewise my notes and notions read differently than my blog posts. Because my blog posts have an audience, my notes/notions are half of the internal dialogue with myself. Were I to annotate in the knowledge that it would be public, I would write very differently, it would be more a performance, less probing forwards in my thoughts. I remember that publicly shared bookmarks with notes in Delicious already had that effect for me. Do you annotate differently in public view, self censoring or self editing?

      To a great extent, Hypothes.is has such a small footprint of users (in comparison to massive platforms like Twitter, Facebook, etc.) that it's never been a performative platform for me. As a design choice they have specifically kept their social media functionalities very sparse, so one also doesn't generally encounter the toxic elements that are rampant in other locations. This helps immensely. I might likely change my tune if it were ever to hit larger scales or experienced the Eternal September effect.

      Beyond this, I mostly endeavor to write things for later re-use. As a result I'm trying to write as clearly as possible in full sentences and explain things as best I can so that my future self doesn't need to do heavy work or lifting to recreate the context or do heavy editing. Writing notes in public and knowing that others might read these ideas does hold my feet to the fire in this respect. Half-formed thoughts are often shaky and unclear both to me and to others and really do no one any good. In personal experience they also tend not to be revisited and revised or revised as well as I would have done the first time around (in public or otherwise).

      Occasionally I'll be in a rush reading something and not have time for more detailed notes in which case I'll do my best to get the broad gist knowing that later in the day or at least within the week, I'll revisit the notes in my own spaces and heavily elaborate on them. I've been endeavoring to stay away from this bad habit though as it's just kicking the can down the road and not getting the work done that I ultimately want to have. Usually when I'm being fast/lazy, my notes will revert to highlighting and tagging sections of material that are straightforward facts that I'll only be reframing into my own words at a later date for reuse. If it's an original though or comment or link to something important, I'll go all in and put in the actual work right now. Doing it later has generally been a recipe for disaster in my experience.

      There have been a few instances where a half-formed thought does get seen and called out. Or it's a thought which I have significantly more personal context for and that is only reflected in the body of my other notes, but isn't apparent in the public version. Usually these provide some additional insight which I hadn't had that makes the overall enterprise more interesting. Here's a recent example, albeit on a private document, but which I think still has enough context to be reasonably clear: https://hypothes.is/a/vmmw4KPmEeyvf7NWphRiMw

      There may also be infrequent articles online which are heavily annotated and which I'm excerpting ideas to be reused later. In these cases I may highlight and rewrite them in my own words for later use in a piece, but I'll make them private or put them in a private group as they don't add any value to the original article or potential conversation though they do add significant value to my collection as "literature notes" for immediate reuse somewhere in the future. On broadly unannotated documents, I'll leave these literature notes public as a means of modeling the practice for others, though without the suggestion of how they would be (re-)used for.

      All this being said, I will very rarely annotate things privately or in a private group if they're of a very sensitive cultural nature or personal in manner. My current set up with Hypothesidian still allows me to import these notes into Obsidian with my API key. In practice these tend to be incredibly rare for me and may only occur a handful of times in a year.

      Generally my intention is that ultimately all of my notes get published in something in a final form somewhere, so I'm really only frontloading the work into the notes now to make the writing/editing process easier later.

    5. How do you get your annotations into the rest of your workflow for notes and learning? How do you prevent that your social annotation tool is yet another separate place where one keeps stuff, cutting off the connections to the rest of one’s work and learning that would make it valuable?

      Where

      My annotations broadly flow into two spaces:

      Obsidian

      My private Obsidian-based vault is where I collect the notes and actively work on, modify, edit, and expand them if and when necessary. This is also the space where I'm broadly attempting to densely interlink them together for future use and publication in other venues. If I could, I would publish these all on the web, but I've yet to find a set up with a low enough admin tax that I can publish them inexpensively in a way I'd like them to appear (primarily with properly linked [[WikiLinks]]) while still owning them in my own space.

      I've been experimenting around with using Blot.im as a solution to display them here https://notes.boffosocko.com/, but at present it's a very limited selection of my extant notes and doesn't include Webmention or other niceties I'd like to add. As it's a very alpha stage experiment I don't recommend anyone follow or use it and it may disappear altogether in the coming months.

      WordPress

      My main website uses WordPress. To a great extent, this is (now) primarily a back up location and the majority of the annotations are unpublished to the public, but are searchable to me on the back end.

      I do, however, use it occasionally for quickly publishing and syndicating select annotations which I think others may find interesting or upon which I'm looking for comments/feedback and don't expect that the audience I'd like these from will find them natively on Hypothes.is' platform. An example of this might be a paper I was reading this weekend on Roland Barthes which discusses his reasonably well documented zettelkasten-like note taking practice. The article can be found here: https://culturemachine.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/373-604-1-PB.pdf with the annotations seen here: https://docdrop.org/pdf/The-Card-Index-as-Creativity-Ma---Wilken-Rowan-upq8g.pdf/. To tip off others in the space, I made a post on my site with a bit of a puzzle and syndicated it to Twitter. A few hours later I posted a follow up with some additional details and links to my notes on hypothesis which got some useful feedback from Matthias Melcher on the Barthes paper as well as on a related paper I mentioned by Luhmann, particularly about German translation, with which I have little facility.

      Another recent illustrative example was this annotation on the Library of Congress website about Vladimir Nabokov which was picked up by my website (though unpublished/not public) but which I syndicated to Twitter primarily to be able to send a notification to Eleanor Konik who I know is interested in the idea of World Building using historical facts and uses Obsidian in her work. (The @mention in the tweet is hiding in the image of the index card so that I could save text space in the main tweet.) Several others interested in note taking and zettelkasten for writing also noticed it and "liked" it. Not being on Hypothes.is to my knowledge much less following me there, neither Eleanor nor the others would have seen it without the Tweet.

      Nabokov used index cards for his research & writing. In one index card for Lolita, he creates a "weight-heigh-age table for girls of school age" to be able to specify Lolita's measurements. He also researched the Colt catalog of 1940. #WorldBuildinghttps://t.co/i16Yc7CbJ8 pic.twitter.com/JSjXV50L3M

      — Chris Aldrich (@ChrisAldrich) April 10, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      How

      Obsidian

      Getting annotations from Hypothes.is to Obsidian is a short two-step process which is reasonably well automated so that I don't spend a lot of time cutting/pasting/formatting.

      I start with an IFTTT recipe that takes the RSS output of Hypothes.is and creates text files directly into my Obsidian vault. The results are quite rudimentary and only include the title of the document, the permalink of the Hypothes.is post, the highlighted text, and my annotation. It doesn't include the tags as RSS doesn't have a specification for these.

      Second, I've set up Hypothesidian which has a much higher fidelity dovetail with the Hypothes.is API to get all the data and even the formatting set up I'm looking for. A reasonably well laid out set of instructions with a low/no code approach for it can be found at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225. It allows importing annotations by a variety of methods including by date and by document URL. I've also made a small modification to it so that tags on Hypothes.is are turned into [[wikilinks]] in Obsidian instead of #tags which I only use sparingly.

      All the IFTTT annotations will be ported individually into a specific Obsidian folder where I'll process them. I can then quickly use Hypothesidian to import the properly laid out version (using templates) of the notes with just a few keystrokes and then focus my time on revising my notes if necessary and then linking them to the appropriate notes already in my system. Finally I'll move them into the appropriate folder based on their content—typically one of the following: zettelkasten, wiki, commonplace, dictionary, or sources (for bibliographic use). Careful watchers will notice that I often use Hypothes.is' "page notes" functionality to create a bookmark-like annotation into which I will frequently post the URL of the page and occasionally a summary of a piece, these are imported into my system and are used as source/bibliographic information. I also have some dovetailing with Zotero as a bibliographic set up which feeds into this data as well.

      This version which I've cobbled together works well for me so that I'm not missing anything, but there are definitely other similar processes available out there both for Obsidian (with plugins or scripts) as well as for other platforms. If I'm not mistaken, I think Readwise (a paid solution) has a set up for note transfer and formatting.

      WordPress

      As there isn't an extant Micropub client for Hypothes.is I initially used RSS as a transport layer to get my notes from Hypothes.is into WordPress. The fidelity isn't great in part because RSS doesn't include any tags. To get some slightly better presentation I set up a workflow using RSS output from Hypothes.is as input into an IFTTT workflow which outputs to a webhook that stands in as a Micropub client targeting my websites Micropub server. Some of the display on my site is assisted by using the Post Kinds plugin, which I know you've been working around yourself. The details may be above some, but I've outlined most of the broad strokes of how this is done in a tutorial at https://boffosocko.com/2020/01/21/using-ifttt-to-syndicate-pesos-content-from-social-services-to-wordpress-using-micropub/. In that example, I use the service Pocket as an example, but Hypothes.is specific information could easily be swapped out on a 1-1 basis.

      A custom stand-alone or even an integrated micropub client for Hypothes.is would be a fantastic project if someone wanted to dig into the details and dovetail it with the Hypothes.is API.

      Why

      Ideally, I'm hoping that small pieces loosely joined and IndieWeb building blocks will allow me to use the tools and have the patterns I'm looking for, without a lot of work, so that I can easily make annotations with Hypothes.is but have and share (POSSE) my content on my own site in a way that works much the way many IndieWeb sites dovetail with Twitter or Mastodon.

      I'm doing some portions of it manually at present, without a lot of overhead, but it would be fun to see someone add micropub and webmention capabilities to Hypothes.is or other IndieWeb building blocks. (I suspect it won't be Hypothes.is themselves as their team is very small and they're already spread thin on multiple other mission critical projects.)

      In the end, I'm using Hypothes.is as a well designed and convenient tool for quickly making notes on digital documents. All the data is flowing to one of two other locations where I'm actually making use of it. While there is some social layer there, I'm getting email notifications through the Hypothes.is settings and the data from my responses just gets rolled back into my spaces which I try to keep open and IndieWeb friendly by default. At the same time, for those who want or need it, Hypothes.is' interface is a great way of reading, searching, sorting, and interacting with my notes in public, particularly until I get something specific and user friendly up to do it on my own domain.

    6. Tools like Hypothes.is are designed as silos to ensure that its social features work.

      As open source as Hypothes.is is, I do wish that it had some additional open IndieWeb building blocks to keep it from being a silo.

      Sadly, I've never had the time, nor the technical expertise and facility with their code to implement the pieces, but I have outlined a bit of what might be done to make the platform a bit less silo-like: https://boffosocko.com/2019/04/08/ideas-for-indieweb-ifying-hypothes-is/

      Fortunately it is open enough for me in other respects that I can bend portions of it to my will and needs beyond what it offers a la carte.

    1. Much of Barthes’ intellectual and pedagogical work was producedusing his cards, not just his published texts. For example, Barthes’Collège de France seminar on the topic of the Neutral, thepenultimate course he would take prior to his death, consisted offour bundles of about 800 cards on which was recorded everythingfrom ‘bibliographic indications, some summaries, notes, andprojects on abandoned figures’ (Clerc, 2005: xxi-xxii).

      In addition to using his card index for producing his published works, Barthes also used his note taking system for teaching as well. His final course on the topic of the Neutral, which he taught as a seminar at Collège de France, was contained in four bundles consisting of 800 cards which contained everything from notes, summaries, figures, and bibliographic entries.


      Given this and the easy portability of index cards, should we instead of recommending notebooks, laptops, or systems like Cornell notes, recommend students take notes directly on their note cards and revise them from there? The physicality of the medium may also have other benefits in terms of touch, smell, use of colors on them, etc. for memory and easy regular use. They could also be used physically for spaced repetition relatively quickly.

      Teachers using their index cards of notes physically in class or in discussions has the benefit of modeling the sort of note taking behaviors we might ask of our students. Imagine a classroom that has access to a teacher's public notes (electronic perhaps) which could be searched and cross linked by the students in real-time. This would also allow students to go beyond the immediate topic at hand, but see how that topic may dovetail with the teachers' other research work and interests. This also gives greater meaning to introductory coursework to allow students to see how it underpins other related and advanced intellectual endeavors and invites the student into those spaces as well. This sort of practice could bring to bear the full weight of the literacy space which we center in Western culture, for compare this with the primarily oral interactions that most teachers have with students. It's only in a small subset of suggested or required readings that students can use for leveraging the knowledge of their teachers while all the remainder of the interactions focus on conversation with the instructor and questions that they might put to them. With access to a teacher's card index, they would have so much more as they might also query that separately without making demands of time and attention to their professors. Even if answers aren't immediately forthcoming from the file, then there might at least be bibliographic entries that could be useful.

      I recently had the experience of asking a colleague for some basic references about the history and culture of the ancient Near East. Knowing that he had some significant expertise in the space, it would have been easier to query his proverbial card index for the lived experience and references than to bother him with the burden of doing work to pull them up.

      What sorts of digital systems could help to center these practices? Hypothes.is quickly comes to mind, though many teachers and even students will prefer to keep their notes private and not public where they're searchable.

      Another potential pathway here are systems like FedWiki or anagora.org which provide shared and interlinked note spaces. Have any educators attempted to use these for coursework? The closest I've seen recently are public groups using shared Roam Research or Obsidian-based collections for book clubs.

    1. https://hypothes.is/a/krnfMl0pEeyvKGMTU02-Lw

      stuhlmueller Dec 14, 2021

      Elicit co-founder here - feel free to leave feedback through hypothesis, we're reading it. :)


      Example in the wild of a company using Hypothes.is to elicit (pun intended) feedback on their product.

    1. An initial stage of annotation might be provided bya professional reader hired to add aids to reading for the owner, including espe-cially mnemonic or meditative aids, or enhancements to the layout, but alsooccasionally self-reflexive or potentially dissenting observations.24 A successionof owner-readers could then add further corrections and comments.

      Stages of annotation in the medieval period


      When is Hypothes.is going to branch out into the business of professional readers to add aids to texts?! :)

      Link this to the professional summary industry that reads books and summarizes them for busy executives

      Link this to the annotations studied by Owen Gingerich in The Book Nobody Read.

    2. Starting in the Renaissance notes weretreated less as temporary tools than as long-term ones, worthy of considerableinvestment of time and effort, of being saved for reuse and in some cases sharedwith others (collaborators in a project or one’s colleagues or heirs). Collections ofnotes were valued as treasuries or storehouses in which to accumulate informa-tion even if they did not serve an immediate purpose. This stockpiling approachto note-taking also required greater attention to organization and finding devicessince the precise uses to which the notes might be put were not clear from theoutset and the scale of accumulation hampered memorization.

      Summary tk


      Modern note taking has seen a reversion to pre-Renaissance practices in which they're much more temporary tools. Relatively few students take notes with an aim for reusing them past their immediate classroom settings or current term of study.

      The revitalization of the idea of the zettelkasten in the late 2010s seems to be helping to reverse this idea. However, there aren't enough online versions of these sorts of notes which allow them to be used with other publics or even to be used and shared with other collaborators. There are some growing spaces seen in the social media note taking space like the anagora.org or the digital gardens space where this seems to have some potential to take off. There's also a small community on Hypothes.is which seems to be practicing this as well, though direct links between various collections of notes is not commonplace.

  4. Mar 2022
    1. With Hypothesis, you can add suggestions and additions as an overlay on current content easily and quickly.  For example, you can provide proper citations or additional information on a topic, note grammatical errors or factual inaccuracies. Experienced Wikipedia editors can then follow up and work with you to add your recommendations to the article.

      The problem with this, generally, but esp. affecting wikis in particular, is that you end up with orphaned and irrelevant/out-of-date annotations.

      Hypothes.is should select an appropriate link relation (in the vein of what it now does with canonical) and scope the annotation appropriately—even if the user does not actually have his or her browser pointed at the exact revision that is "current".

    1. I already have several highlights made by external pdf applications like ocular. These annotations are being detected by the pdf viewer used by this plugin. I wanted a way to add the existing annotations to markdown instead of having to repeat the process. As you can see, the highlights' metadata is being detected upon clicking the highlights. What can be done is add 2 options - Either import all existing annotations and highlights Import the selected annotation/highlight I would love to see this feature being added

      The work to add this particular feature to the plugin may be quite a lot, but for those who want it in the erstwhile and for the developers as an example, one might try looking at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/zotero-zotfile-mdnotes-obsidian-dataview-workflow/15536.

    1. Is there a setting (or would it be possible to add one) so I can change the width of the sidebar with the annotations? On my bigger monitor it's ok, but on my normal screen I can barely see the actual PDF and the side bar covers almost half the screen. Also, I had a very hard time getting the plugin to actually find the file. It couldn't find it anywhere aside from the same folder the annotation note is in. (I tried a different folder in the vault, as well as an absolute path on my PC.) Aside from that, love the plugin! Thanks :)

      The ability to resize the Hypothes.is drawer is already built into the Hypothes.is interface natively. In the top left of the drawer there is a ">" tab that you can drag to resize the annotations window to suit your needs. Clicking on it will allow you to open and close the pane as needed. If it's closed (the icon appears as "<"), you can highlight and choose "annotate" or "highlight" and it will automatically re-open the Hypothes.is interface.

    1. I've been using the Hypothesis Obsidian annotator to annotate PDFs in an Obsidian vault—so I have a bunch of annotations as markdown files. I am now attempting to publish the Obsidian vault as a website at movement-ontology.brandazzle.net, but the plugin apparently isn't supported on website, as the annotations do not render. Is there any way I could host the Hypothesis tools on the website and connect my annotations so that viewers can see my annotations?

      Brandon,

      Obsidian Annotator (https://github.com/elias-sundqvist/obsidian-annotator), which I'm presuming you're using, looks like it's working from within Obsidian instead of a web page and is very clever looking, but without some significant work, I don't think it's going to provide you with the results you're looking for. It sounds like you want an all-public chain of work and Obsidian Annotator currently defaults to an all-private chain.

      From my brief perusal of what's going on, the plugin appears to be tied to a single Hypothes.is account (likely the developer's) which defaults all annotations to private (only you) and as a result, even if you had the permalink to the annotations you'd not be able to see them presented on the web as they're all private and you wouldn't have access to the account. You could try filing some issues on the related Github repository to see if the developer might add the ability to make public annotations using your own personal account, which I'm sure would require your personal API key for Hypothes.is to be put into the settings page for the plugin in Obsidian. Another issue I see is that it's taking Hypothesis tags and turning them into Obsidian tags, which is generally fine, but the developer isn't accounting for multi-word tags which is creating unintended tag errors along the way that will need to be manually fixed.

      If you're open to an alternate method of annotating and doing so in public, I can recommend a workflow that will allow you to do what it sounds like you're attempting. It starts with annotating .pdf files (either on the web, or as local files in your browser) in public using your own Hypothes.is account. (Most of this also works with private annotations, but if you want them to appear on public versions of web-hosted .pdf files with the same fingerprints, you'll want them to be public so others can see/interact with them.) Next set up the Hypothesidian script described here: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225. There are some useful hints further down the thread on that page, so read the whole thing. The Github repository for it is here: https://github.com/SilentVoid13/Templater/discussions/191 if you need it. I've documented a few modifications I've made to the built-in template to suit my particular needs and which might serve as a template if you find it useful: https://boffosocko.com/2021/07/08/hypothes-is-obsidian-hypothesidian-for-easier-note-taking-and-formatting/.

      You can then use the functionality of Hypothesidian to pull in the annotations you want (by day, by document, only your annotations, all the annotations on a document, etc.) For .pdf files, you may require Jon Udell's facet tool https://jonudell.info/h/facet/ to search your personal account for the name of the file or one of the tags you used. When you find it, you can click on it and it will open a new browser window that contains the appropriate urn file "key" you'll need to put into Hypothesidian to grab the annotations from a particular .pdf file. It will be in the general form: urn:x-pdf:1234abcd5678efgh9101112ijkl13. I haven't found an easier means of pulling out the URN/fingerprint of pdf files, though others may have ideas.

      When you pull in your annotations you can also get/find permalinks to the annotations on the web if you like. I usually hide mine in the footnotes of pages with the labels "annotation in situ" and "syndication links", a habit I've picked up from the IndieWeb community (https://indieweb.org/posts-elsewhere). You can see a sample of how this might be done at https://notes.boffosocko.com/where-are-the-empty-spaces-on-the-internet where I've been doing some small scale Hypothes.is/Obsidian/Web experiments. (I'm currently using Blot.im to get [[wikilinks]] to resolve.)

      Another strong option you're probably looking for is to use "via" links (https://web.hypothes.is/blog/meetvia/) on the URLs for your pdf files so that people can automatically see the annotation layer. (This may require whitelisting on Hypothes.is' end depending on where the files are hosted; alternately https://docdrop.org/ may be useful here.) Then if you've annotated those publicly, they'll also be able to see them that way too.

      Another side benefit of this method is that it doesn't require the Data View plugin for Obsidian to render your annotations within Obsidian which also means you'll have cleaner looking pages of annotations in your web published versions. (ie. none of the %% code blocks which don't render properly on the web)

      As I notice you're using some scanned .pdf files which often don't have proper OCR and can make creating annotations with appropriate Hypothes.is anchors, you might also appreciate the functionality of docdrop for this as well.

      Given your reliance on documents and the fact that you've annotated some in what looks like Adobe Acrobat or a similar .pdf program, you might additionally enjoy using Zotero with Obsidian, Zotfile, and mdnotes as outlined here: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/zotero-zotfile-mdnotes-obsidian-dataview-workflow/15536. It's relatively slick, but requires additional set up, reliance on more moving pieces, and isn't as nice an overall user interface in comparison to Hypothes.is. It also misses all of the potential useful social annotation you might get with Hypothes.is.

      Hopefully this is all reasonably clear and helpful. I'd be interested in hearing about options from others who are using Hypothes.is in conjunction with Obsidian or other related note taking tools and publishing them to the web after-the-fact.

      Best, Chris Aldrich

    1. https://blog.jethro.dev/posts/taking_srs_seriously/

      And someone has actually built a spaced repetition system with Hypothesis! So it's not just me... 😄

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eP8Bq9x5yw

      A nice overview of spaced repetition systems.

      Soren Bjornstad previously worked for Anki and is now at Remnote.


      I wonder if anyone has created a spaced repetition system set up that leverages Hypothes.is? It would be cool to write questions and answers as one takes notes in Hypothes.is and then be able to quickly/easily export those annotations into a spaced repetition system.

      Example:

      Q: What is the best annotation tool on the inernet?


      A: Hypothes.is

    1. Research shows that people who are asked to write on complex topics,instead of being allowed to talk and gesture about them, end up reasoning lessastutely and drawing fewer inferences.

      Should active reading, thinking, and annotating also include making gestures as a means of providing more clear reasoning, and drawing better inferences from one's material?

      Would gestural movements with a hand or physical writing be helpful in annotation over digital annotation using typing as an input? Is this related to the anecdotal evidence/research of handwriting being a better method of note taking over typing?

      Could products like Hypothes.is or Diigo benefit from the use of digital pens on screens as a means of improving learning over using a mouse and a keyboard to highlight and annotate?

    1. Nice to see someone speaking so joyously about annotations. :) Looks like you've got a heavier analog version of the digital version of what I'm doing. I often use Kindle hightlights/annotations and then import them to Obsidian. Alternately I use Hypothes.is on online .pdf copies and then use Hypothesidian (https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225) to import all my digital notes into Obsidian. I love being able to keep the original context of the text close for either creating literature notes or expanding fleeting notes into permanent ones. When I am in a more analog mode (who doesn't love the feel of a nice fountain pen on paper?) I have a method for doing optical character recognition on my handwritten notes to save the time of typing them out again: https://boffosocko.com/2021/12/20/55799844/

    1. And it’s easier to share a personal story when you’re composing it 280 characters at a time and publishing it as you go, without thinking about or knowing where the end may be. It’s at least easier than staring down a blank text editor with no limit and having to decide later how much of a 2,500 word rant is worth sharing, anyway.

      Ideas fill their spaces.

      When writing it can be daunting to see a long blank screen and feel like you've got to fill it up with ideas de novo.

      From the other perspective if you're starting with a smaller space like a Twitter input box or index card you may find that you write too much and require the ability to edit things down to fit the sparse space.


      I do quite like the small space provided by Hypothes.is which has the ability to expand and scroll as you write so that it has the Goldilocks feel of not too small, not too big, but "just right".


      Micro.blog has a feature that starts with a box that can grow with the content. Once going past 280 characters it also adds an optional input box to give the post a title if one wants it to be an article rather than a simple note.


      Link to idea of Occamy from the movie Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them that can grow or shrink to fit the available space: https://harrypotter.fandom.com/wiki/Occamy

    1. That would put these great conversations as starting points into our private notes, and put selected private thoughts (and better incentives) into our conversations

      Worth considering why these private notes are not first-class Hypothes.is annotations already (even if not marked public)!

  5. Feb 2022
    1. urn:x-pdf:a08d875ad57045edf70d283087a0e339 (PDF fingerprint)

      To find this urn address for your .pdf files and their fingerprints (particularly local/private files not otherwise hosted in the cloud):

      1. Visit https://jonudell.info/h/facet/
      2. Search for your Hypothes.is username (and perhaps a tag) to find the document name and annotations you made on it.
      3. You should be able to click on the document title which will take you to a non-loading web page with an address that looks something like this: urn:x-pdf:1ab23cd45e678fgh9012i34j56k78l90

      If others know of alternate/faster methods of finding URIs for local pdf files I'd be happy to hear about them.

    1. pupka12Dec '21Does anyone know a way to do this with my annotations on locally stored pdfs? That would be lovely. I know I could probably move them to some cloud, but I have no idea which one could work (the most popular ones seem not to)

      If you've annotated local (private) files within your browser using Hypothes.is, you'll need to find the uri path (a rough equivalent to http address for web pages) for your .pdf file with its "fingerprint" (a long unique number).

      To do this 1. Visit https://jonudell.info/h/facet/ 2. Search for your Hypothes.is username (and perhaps a tag) to find the document name and annotations you made on it. 3. You should be able to click on the document title which will take you to a non-loading web page with an address that looks something like this: urn:x-pdf:1ab23cd45e678fgh9012i34j56k78l90 4. Copy and paste that address you get into Hypothesidian as the address for an appropriate option like "Retrieve my annotations for a web article or web pdf". 5. Hit enter/return. 6. Hypothesidian should return the appropriate annotations for that document.

      If others know of alternate/faster methods of finding URis for local pdf files I'd be happy to hear about them.

    1. Suppose the server were sending rel=canonical in a Link header for non-document resources (e.g. images like this one). Is the Hypothesis bookmarklet/extension thorough enough to deal with this?

  6. Jan 2022
    1. ... meaning I'm not within any form of an LMS. I've beaten the drum for some time about the use of Hypo. outside of an LMS environment (e.g., I edit and give gratis feedback on PDF articles posted to Academia.com, etc.). Anyone out there who's also "adrift" in this non-remunerative (from Hypo's point of view) area who also finds Hypo. a worthwhile aid in their individual endeavors?  Maybe we could/should form a separate thread for Hypo. users outside of the LMS world?And I'll explain my weird handle to you in the process...hint: it's because I thought Hypothes.is was actually Iceland-based... ;)J.

      Hakarlfresser, There are definitely a bunch of us (non-LMSers) floating around who you'll slowly see in the margins. It may take some time and effort to find your tribe, but it's doable. I think the biggest group I've run across was as a result of iAnnotate 2021, and in particular the note taking session: https://iannotate.org/2021/program/panel_font.html. Looking at the annotations on the iAnnotate site will uncover a few of us. If it helps, I list a few of the feeds of others that I'm following here: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

      Best, Chris https://hypothes.is/users/ChrisAldrich

    1. You could imagine employers shipping corporate laptops with pre-installed notes to make it easier to transfer (previously tacit) knowledge and thus improve the onboarding process for new hires.

      Using Hypothes.is as an annotation layer for internal company notes in a private space could be an interesting way for easing on-boarding.

      In some sense, this is a little bit of what the annotated syllabus is doing for students at the beginning of a course (in addition to helping to onboard them to the idea of social annotation at the same time.)

    2. Why isn’t there a digital note taking tool that works like this?

      It would be interesting if there were a timed pop-up notification functionality within Hypothes.is directly so that one could create follow-up reminders for particular highlights and annotations.

      I've thought about wanting this before though I've got something in my data store for those notes that does something like this in a third-party sense.

    3. You could write down notes like this in a separate notebook, but then you’d lose the connection to the source they are based on. What makes post-it notes so interesting is the spatial relationship between the notes and their respective context.

      Sticky notes or Post-It notes create a physical and spatial relationship between the note and its context. This same sort of relationship is recreated by taking notes in Hypothes.is which links the note or idea directly to the part of the web page or document which spurred it. Moving these notes into other platforms (Roam Research, Obsidian, etc.) can be done in a way so as to keep the physical link (using URLs) so that one can quickly and easily revisit the original context if necessary.

      This affordance is an incredibly useful one which is generally neglected in the note taking space.


      How often in practice is this done though?

  7. Dec 2021
    1. Annotates: { "license": "https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/", "obj_id": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bfb0105342", "source_token": "8075957f-e0da-405f-9eee-7f35519d7c4c", "occurred_at": "2015-11-04T06:30:10Z", "subj_id": "https://hypothes.is/a/NrIw4KlKTwa7MzbTrMAyjw", "id": "00044ac9-d729-4d3f-a2c8-618bcdf1d252", "evidence_record": "https://evidence.eventdata.crossref.org/evidence/20170412-hypothesis-de560308-e500-4c55-ba28-799d7b272039", "terms": "https://doi.org/10.13003/CED-terms-of-use", "action": "add", "subj": { "pid": "https://hypothes.is/a/NrIw4KlKTwa7MzbTrMAyjw", "json-url": "https://hypothes.is/api/annotations/NrIw4KlKTwa7MzbTrMAyjw", "url": "https://hyp.is/NrIw4KlKTwa7MzbTrMAyjw/arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9803052", "type": "annotation", "title": "[This article](http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9803052) was referenced by [\"Decoherence\"](http://web.mit.edu/redingtn/www/netadv/Xdecoherenc.html) on Sunday, September 25 2005.", "issued": "2015-11-04T06:30:10Z" }, "source_id": "hypothesis", "obj": { "pid": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bfb0105342", "url": "http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9803052" }, "timestamp": "2017-04-12T07:16:20Z", "relation_type_id": "annotates" }
      • An arXiv page (article with DOI) is considered OBJECT (DOI)
      • This example is an AUTO-REFERENCE !!!

      • It is due to the arXiv Agent (?)

    2. The Hypothes.is Agent monitors annotations
      • See examples of Evidences
      • Agent uses "url": "https://hypothes.is/api/search"
      • GUESS: filter by date of annotation? "extra": { "cutoff-date": "2005-04-13T09:08:04.578Z"
    1. Using this idea, it is easy to include some javascript generated by a server-side process (eg. JSON object). var e = document.createElement("script"); e.src = 'http://myserver.com/servlet/getfeed?url=http://realhowto.blogspot.com'; e.type="text/javascript"; document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(e);
      • IDEA: probar con hlib
    1. In addition to facet, other tools based on this library include CopyAnnotations and TagRename
      • SEE
    2. A JavaScript wrapper for the Hypothesis API The HelloWorldAnnotated example uses functions from a library, hlib, to post an annotation to the Hypothesis service.
      • AT LAST!
      • SEE
    1. SciBot Link: https://github.com/SciCrunch/scibot Description: This tool finds RRIDs in articles, looks them up in the SciCrunch resolver and creates Hypothesis annotations that anchor to the RRIDs and display lookup results. More info here.

      see

    2. Programming tools

      Does exists an Javascript wrapper for hypothes.is?

    3. Annotation viewing and export Link: https://jonudell.info/h/facet Screencast: https://jonudell.net/h/facet.mp4 Description:  View annotations by user, group, URL, or tag. Export results to HTML, CSV, text, or Markdown.

      "Export" annotations

    4. word javascript didn't found

      • searching for wrappers en javascript...
    1. sometimes you vaguely recall reading about something or seeing a link, but don't remember where exactly. Was it on stackoverflow? Or in some github issue? Or in a conversation with friend?
      • HERE!
      • therefore I use hypothes.is
      • then, I use the "h" search tool
    1. Since 2011, the non-profit Hypothes Is Project[25] has offered the free, open web annotation service Hypothes.is. The service features annotation via a Chrome extension, bookmarklet or proxy server, as well as integration into a LMS or CMS. Both webpages and PDFs can be annotated. Other web-based text annotation systems are collaborative software for distributed text editing and versioning, which also feature annotation and commenting interfaces.

      mention

    1. The userID for your Zotero API usage, available here. A developer API key for Zotero, you can make one here. Your Hypothesis username, which should just be the username you use to access the service. Your Hypothesis Developer API key, available here.

      necesita usuarios (zotero y hypothes.is) y API keys de cada uno

    2. This program scans through a Zotero library and checks each URL for Hypothesis annotations. If annotations are found it imports them into the Zotero library as note objects with their associated tags.

      INCREIBLE PERO CIERTO! THANK YOU!

    1. Obsidian Annotator This is a plugin for Obsidian (https://obsidian.md). It allows you to open and annotate PDF and EPUB files. The plugin is based on https://web.hypothes.is/, but modified to store the annotations in a local markdown file instead of on the internet.

      INCREIBLE PERO CIERTO! THANK YOU!

    1. I've been having a really good time this week writing prompts as inline annotations on web books.

      I'm seeing a larger growing pattern of people who are using Hypothes.is as a means of pulling their notes into their digital notebooks. Here Andy Matuschak is doing it to create spaced repetition cards for mnemonic purposes, a use case I haven't seen much of in the Hypothes.is space.

      The fact that many are using Readwise (a paid monthly subscription) to do so is unfortunate. We definitely need more open source/free methods for doing this.

      The Hypothesidian plugin for Obsidian is one of the few direct products I've seen in the space so far.

      Most of this knowledge pattern I've seen has been in the tools for thought space and not within educational spaces, thought there is some overlap which will create the necessary bleed-through.

      Services like IFTTT might also be a potential solution, but outputs from RSS and ATOM strip out data like tags which are highly useful. Perhaps a custom IFTTT integration? Though this opens up the issue of yet another middleman service for collecting rents.


      Source: https://twitter.com/withorbit/status/1474575944429957125

      I've been having a really good time this week writing prompts as inline annotations on web books. pic.twitter.com/gCvpTAsjt1

      — Orbit (@withorbit) December 25, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

  8. Nov 2021
    1. Chris heeft zo nu en dan een aparte notitie met de oorspronkelijke URL. Ik vermoed om dezelfde reden, om als nodig Hypothesis te omzeilen.

      Chris has a separate note every now and then with the original URL. I suspect for the same reason, to get around Hypothesis if necessary.

      If I'm understanding correctly, yes, this is exactly why I'm doing this. ;)

  9. Oct 2021
    1. DIRECTORY (in progress): This post is my directory. This post will be tagged with all tags I ever use (in chronological order). It allows people to see all my tags, not just the top 50. Additionally, this allows me to keep track. I plan on sorting tags in categories in reply to this comment.

      External links:

      Tags categories will be posted in comments of this post.

  10. Sep 2021
    1. I use https://hypothes.is/ 55 to annotate web sites and web based pdf’s. I want to easily import them into Obsidian. This script uses the Templater template.

      This is another good possibility to hide most of the machinery of connecting hypothesis to obsidian. I like that it takes advantage of relatively robust existing bits of obsidian.

    1. exporting hypothesis annotations to obsidian (markdown files)

      CLI-based method for batch exporting hypothesis annotations in markdown suitable for adding to Obsidian. I'm not sure I like it; the idea of batch-filing the process irks me. I would prefer for it to all happen in the background.

    1. This is a plugin for Obsidian (https://obsidian.md). It allows you to open and annotate PDF and EPUB files. The plugin is based on https://web.hypothes.is/, but modified to store the annotations in a local markdown file instead of on the internet.

      This has possibilities because it backgrounds a lot of the heavy lifting by saving the annotation to a local markdown file.

    1. I love this outline/syllabus for creating a commonplace book (as a potential replacement for a term paper).

      I'd be curious to see those who are using Hypothes.is as a communal reading tool in coursework utilize this outline (or similar ones) in combination with their annotation practices.

      Curating one's annotations and placing them into a commonplace book or zettelkasten would be a fantastic rhetorical exercise to extend the value of one's notes and ideas.

    1. One last resource for augmenting our minds can be found in other people’s minds. We are fundamentally social creatures, oriented toward thinking with others. Problems arise when we do our thinking alone — for example, the well-documented phenomenon of confirmation bias, which leads us to preferentially attend to information that supports the beliefs we already hold. According to the argumentative theory of reasoning, advanced by the cognitive scientists Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber, this bias is accentuated when we reason in solitude. Humans’ evolved faculty for reasoning is not aimed at arriving at objective truth, Mercier and Sperber point out; it is aimed at defending our arguments and scrutinizing others’. It makes sense, they write, “for a cognitive mechanism aimed at justifying oneself and convincing others to be biased and lazy. The failures of the solitary reasoner follow from the use of reason in an ‘abnormal’ context’” — that is, a nonsocial one. Vigorous debates, engaged with an open mind, are the solution. “When people who disagree but have a common interest in finding the truth or the solution to a problem exchange arguments with each other, the best idea tends to win,” they write, citing evidence from studies of students, forecasters and jury members.

      Thinking in solitary can increase one's susceptibility to confirmation bias. Thinking in groups can mitigate this.

      How might keeping one's notes in public potentially help fight against these cognitive biases?

      Is having a "conversation in the margins" with an author using annotation tools like Hypothes.is a way to help mitigate this sort of cognitive bias?

      At the far end of the spectrum how do we prevent this social thinking from becoming groupthink, or the practice of thinking or making decisions as a group in a way that discourages creativity or individual responsibility?

    1. Social learning does not mean learning without tension or argument. In “Thinking with Peers”, Paul shows that argument and conflict are useful ways to focus attention and strengthen ideas, so long as the arguing is done with a certain amount of openness to new ideas. She approvingly quotes Stanford Business School professor Robert Sutton’s formula for productive conflict: “People should fight as if they are right, and listen as if they are wrong.” The brain, it seems, likes conflict. Or, at least, conflict helps strengthen attention.

      I wonder how this may be leveraged with those who are using Hypothes.is for conversations in the margins in classrooms?

      cc: @remikalir, @jeremydean, @nateangell

      Could teachers specifically sow contention into their conversations? Cross reference the idea of a devil's advocate.

      I love the aphorism:

      “People should fight as if they are right, and listen as if they are wrong.” — Robert Sutton, Stanford Buisness School professor's formula for productive conflict

    1. Hypothesis should highlight this as one of its killer features: private "replies". More permanent than a draft.

      (Unfortunately, a bug in the Hypothesis server means that this page is a 404 even for me—the person who wrote the reply, trying to view it while logged in...)

    1. https://jrdingwall.ca/blogwall/25-years-of-ed-tech-blogs/

      JR writes about some of his journey into blogging.

      I appreciate some of the last part about the 9x9x25 blogs. For JR it seems like some smaller prompts got him into more regular writing.

      He mentions Stephen Downes regular workflow as well. I think mine is fairly similar to Stephen's. To some extent, I write much more on my own website now than I ever had before. This is because I post a lot more frequently to my own site, in part because it's just so easy to do. I'll bookmark things or post about what I've recently read or watched. My short commentary on some of these is just that, short commentary. But occasionally I discover, depending on the subject, that those short notes and bookmark posts will spring into something bigger or larger. Sometimes it's a handful of small posts over a few days or weeks that ultimately inspires the longer thing. The key seems to be to write something.

      Perhaps a snowball analogy will work. I take a tiny snowball and give it a proverbial roll. Sometimes it sits there and other times it rolls down the hill and turns into a much larger snowball. Other times I get a group of them and build a full snowman.

      Of course lately a lot of my writing starts, like this did, as an annotation (using Hypothes.is) to something I was reading. It then posts to my website with some context and we're off to the races.

    1. Jot down connections and tangential thoughts, underline key passages, and make a habit of building a dialogue with the author(s).

      Some people consider annotations to be a conversation with the author. But you're also having a conversation with yourself and your own thoughts. (Cross reference Niklas Luhmann's having a conversation with himself via his notes.)

      Further, there are platforms like Hypothes.is or social platforms like Twitter where you can move the conversation out of the page and engage with others. However, for this Hypothes.is has more power because it keeps the conversation linked to the original text and the original context (which I'll explicitly translate here as "with the text") to underline the point.

      cf:

      cum (Latin) : with

      textus (Latin) : tissue, web, texture, fabric, connection, language

      contextus (Latin) : context, connection, coherence, connexion, coherency, text

  11. Aug 2021
    1. And then there is, finally, the multi-dynamic bookmark – and the story of how a new specimen of this type was discovered. The qualifier “multi-dynamic”, which is my own, refers to the fact that this bookmark is of the moving type, while at the same time it is able to do much more than simply marking a page. The bookmark’s use is as simple as it is clever. This becomes clear when we look at the bookmark in action, for example in this twelfth-century Bible in the Houghton Library.

      The so-called "multi-dynamic" bookmark was a string (or strip of parchment) with a sliding pocket and a spin-able disk to allow one to indicate how far down a page and which column (typically columns 1-4) one was last reading.

      My own personal digital version of this is with Hypothes.is. I'll sometimes create a highlight or annotation of a portion of a text (especially with longer digital books) where I was last reading. When I return to the text, I can click on my last marked annotation and begin re-reading from there.

    1. In whichever group you choose, you can make your note private by choosing “Only Me”. For more information on how this works, see our help article: Who can see my annotations?

      The menu on the top left allows people to either show their annotations to others or make it private.

    1. Helping Hands on the Medieval Page

      👈

      As I'm thinking about this, I can't help but think that Hypothes.is, if only for fun, ought to add a manicule functionality to their annotation product.

      I totally want to be able to highlight portions of my reading with an octopus manicule!

      I can see their new tagline now:

      Helping hands on the digital page.

      image of an octopus drawn in a book margin with the legs stretching so as to indicate an important passage of several lines

      I'm off to draw some octopi...

  12. Jul 2021
    1. u/MushroomPuddle17 days agoGetting started with a commonplace notebook as someone who isn't creative? .t3_ojhwrb ._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; } Hello everyone!I've known about commonplace books for years and always feel a surge of inspiration when I see them but I'm really not creative. I don't know what I'd ever write in one? I don't ever really have any grand ideas or plans. I don't seem to have conversations or read things that necessarily inspire me. I just live a very regular life where nothing really sticks out to me as important. I've tried bullet journals before and had the same issue.Does anyone have any suggestions? I'd really appreciate it.

      I'm not sure what you mean by your use of the word "creative". I'm worried that you've seen too many photos of decorative and frilly commonplace books on Instagram and Pinterest. I tend to call most of those "productivity porn" as their users spend hours decorating and not enough collecting and expanding their thoughts, which is really their primary use and value. Usually whatever time they think they're "saving" in having a cpb, they're wasting in decorating it. (Though if decorating is your thing, then have at it...) My commonplace is a (boring to others) location of mostly walls of text. It is chock full of creative ideas, thoughts, and questions though. If you're having trouble with a place to start, try creating a (free) Hypothes.is account and highlighting/annotating everything you read online. (Here's what mine looks like: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich, you'll notice that it could be considered a form of searchable digital commonplace book all by itself.) Then once a day/week/month, take the best of the quotes, ideas, highlights, and your notes, replies, questions and put them into your physical or digital commonplace. Build on them, cross link them, expand on them over time. Do some research to start answering any of the questions you came up with. By starting with annotating things you're personally interested in, you'll soon have a collection of things that become highly valuable and useful to you. After a few weeks you'll start seeing something and likely see a change in the way you're reading, writing, and even thinking.

      reply to: https://www.reddit.com/r/commonplacebook/comments/ojhwrb/getting_started_with_a_commonplace_notebook_as/

    1. https://forum.obsidian.md/t/epub-support/1403

      Some interesting resources here, though none currently suit workflows I'm keen to support yet. There is a reference to FuturePress' epub.js which could be intriguing, though even here, I'm more likely to stick with Hypothes.is for annotating and note taking to keep context.

    1. Xynopxies · 5dI use hypothesis.io. But it doesn't have any functional export option available. So what I do is Copy everything that it displays and then run some regex to extract the text(removing junks like username, time,tags) using phrase express and then paste it on my obsidian. It usually takes a few seconds.

      If you mean hypothes.is, you might take a look at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225 which has some options for doing this easily.

    1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed ornare sem

      I'm annotating the text using hypothes.is - it looks like you cannot annotate an image with this. You have to sign up to annotate text like this and log in.

    1. This is pretty slick and looks pretty in its published form. Great to see others are using clever set ups like this as posting interfaces.

      I have a feeling that other TiddlyWiki users would love this sort of thing. While TW may not seem as au courant, it's still got some awesome equivalent functionality and great UI which is what most of the users in the note taking space really care about.

      I do still wish that there was a micropub set up for Hypothes.is to make this sort of thing easier for the non-technical users.

    1. Titi Lucreti Cari De Rerum Natura Libri SexWith a Translation and NotesVolume 1Edited by H. A. J. Munro Lucretius

      Testing out the OCR functionality of docdrop.org.

      I'm noticing that the pdf fingerprint of this text somehow matches that of other texts as there are a lot of non-related annotations on this page.

      Is docdrop doing something squirrelly with the fingerprint @dwhly?

  13. Jun 2021
    1. Enjoy Reading in Distributed Communities Zocurelia supports reading together, especially when your community is spread all over the world, your school, your university or your city.

      Demo'd at I Annotate 2021 by creator Axel Dürkop.

    1. This is awesome and moves a bit closer in functionality for how one might use the platform as a commonplace book. Not sure how it's different to the main search except that it's geared toward smaller groups rather than the public timeline which is too large to view.

      My first impressions:

      • It doesn't seem to show within Firefox.
      • It overloads in the Public timeline

      via: Michael mention at IAnno21

    2. This page needs to have some of the plugins for note taking added to it. Many are listed on Github. Circle back to this with a list of additions.

    1. This page is currently in public beta mode. I'm am trying to get feedback from multiple people(including you) before I publish it. To facilitate the feedback submission, I have added a highlighting and commenting option. To use that, just select any text(for eg, double click on this: DOUBLE CLICK ME). When you get a login prompt, use this login details... Username: zettelkasten Password: notes If you have any corrections or suggestions, please select the text and add a comment using this system.

      This is pretty cool. I've not run into anyone using an open account on Hypothes.is to solicit anonymous feedback on an article before.