142 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The paradox of hoarding isthat no matter how much we collect and accumulate, it’s neverenough.

      How is the paradox of hoarding related to the collector's fallacy?

      Regardless of how much you collect, you can't take it with you. So what's the value? - Having and using it to sustain you while you're alive. - Combining it in creative ways to leave behind new ideas and new innovations for those who follow you. - others?

    2. The Essential Habits ofDigital Organizers

      This chapter is too entailed with productivity advice, which can be useful to some, but isn't as note taking focused for those who probably need more of that.

      What is the differentiator between knowledge workers, knowledge creators, students, researchers, academics. How do we even clearly delineate knowledge worker as a concept. It feels far too nebulous which makes it more difficult to differentiate systems for them to use for improving productivity and efficiency.

    3. This fundamental tension—between quality and quantity—is atension we share as knowledge workers. We also must producework to an extremely high standard, and we must do it fast,continuously, all year long. We are like sprinters who are also tryingto run a marathon.

      Do we? Really? This definitely needs reframing and books like this that play on these sorts of fears are both partially responsible, but are also preying on an atmosphere which they're propagating.

      This is the sort of sad thing that a productivity guru would say...

  2. Jun 2022
    1. 1980s: "I always typed a few hours a day on a heavy and noisy IBM typewriter. Before converting to the Apple faith, I wrote down every interesting idea or possibly useful datum on 5 × 8 cards that I kept in card-boxes. But I used them only sparingly to write papers of books, for they were just random collections. Once an unknown American scholar phoned me to announce that he was about to commit suicide because he had failed to craft a general theory of ideas out of thousands of cards that he had filled in the course of a decade. He had been a casualty of dataism, the idea that knowledge of anything is just a collection of bits of knowledge." (pp. 273–274)

      Anecdotal evidence of contemplation of suicide based on over-collection of notes without creating a clear thesis or use for them.

      I'm curious who the colleague was and what or how their note taking system wasn't working for them. Most likely the inability to link ideas to each other, lack of clear examples of others doing the practice to help guide them?

    1. Your Second Brain shouldn’t be just another way of confirmingwhat you already know.

      Your notes shouldn't be a place to collect what you already know.

    2. The biggest pitfall I see people falling into once they begincapturing digital notes is saving too much

      Collecting everything in your notes, especially in digital realms where saving is phenomenally easier and nearly automatic, is a fatal flaw in note taking.

  3. May 2022
    1. is the the um the writing by hand um because you know you can you can certainly write by hand and write down facts you know as well um 00:30:36 and uh and so yeah but i but what i what i do hold is that it's way way harder to uh store a lot of facts in 00:30:49 you know an analog settle costin because there's no copy paste you actually have to write out the facts by hand and as a result of that i think there are more benefits over digital in that you 00:31:02 are writing down uh neuro imprinting you know facts onto your mind that you can later recall more rapidly and stuff and um i think that's a benefit

      Keeping a manual zettelkasten using pen/pencil and paper may be beneficial to some as it will tend to remove the easy functionality of cut and paste in the digital space and force the user to think a bit more deeply about what they're working on and expand on it. Those with paper zettelkasten aren't as likely to spend time collecting simple facts as a result of this. This will make the content going into the system much more solid and reusable in the future.

    1. That people show off these illegible globs in public only makes sense from a signaling perspective: They are saying, “look at how many nodes I have in my brain, amazing nodes, I have so many nodes that a peon such as yourself can’t even guess what’s going on here!”

      I have tongue-in-cheek posted a massive graph indicating that it was only a "few days work" to see what sort of reaction it would get. No one batted an eyelash, which makes me think that too many are "collectors" and aren't actually building something or using their system correctly.

      There is a dearth of solid examples of these systems online for people to look at and evaluate critically. This is killing the space slowly.

  4. Apr 2022
    1. ReconfigBehSci [@SciBeh]. (2021, November 26). Clearly we haven’t “kept borders closed forever”—Most borders have been open for many months now. The question is whether we urgently close a particular border now. “kept borders closed forever” = straw man (and I say this as a researcher on fallacies of argumentation) [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1464131447799922689

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 2). @MichaelPaulEdw1 @islaut1 @ToddHorowitz3 @richarddmorey @MaartenvSmeden as I just said to @islaut1 if you want to force the logical contradiction you move away entirely from all of the interesting cases of inference from absence in everyday life, including the interesting statistical cases of, for example, null findings—So I think we now agree? [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1356530759016792064

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 1). @MaartenvSmeden @richarddmorey you absolutely did (and I would have been disappointed if you hadn’t ;-)! It was a general comment prompted by the fact that the title of the article you linked to doesn’t (as is widespread), and I actually genuinely think this is part of the “problem” in pedagogical terms. 1/2 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1356227423067664384

    1. Maarten van Smeden. (2021, February 1). Personal top 10 fallacies and paradoxes in statistics 1. Absence of evidence fallacy 2. Ecological fallacy 3. Stein’s paradox 4. Lord’s paradox 5. Simpson’s paradox 6. Berkson’s paradox 7. Prosecutors fallacy 8. Gambler’s fallacy 9. Lindsey’s paradox 10. Low birthweight paradox [Tweet]. @MaartenvSmeden. https://twitter.com/MaartenvSmeden/status/1356147552362639366

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 2). @MichaelPaulEdw1 @islaut1 @ToddHorowitz3 @richarddmorey as this account is focussed on COVID, maybe time to move the discussion elsewhere- happy to discuss further if you want to get in touch by email—U.hahn" "https://t.co/HOGwHragEb [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1356529368630239232

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 1). Great list, but I think one of the main problems with “absence of evidence fallacy” is its phrasing: “absence of evid. Is not the same as evidence of absence” is a true statement, “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence” is literally false @richarddmorey [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1356172673651503104

    1. (6) ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: “@MichaelPaulEdw1 @islaut1 @ToddHorowitz3 @richarddmorey @MaartenvSmeden and not just misguided (as too simplistic) but part of the problem....” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved February 24, 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1356528429211021319

  5. Mar 2022
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnFHwl2Dbr0

      • System should be as frictionless as possible.
      • Capture in one location. (She says as few as possible, but this is too wishy-washy: she's got a "Readwise page" and a "Links page".)
      • There needs to be levels of processing.
        • Split out based on future value.
      • Everything has resources. How to capture metadata and be able to cite it?

      Everything needs to have a "Why"? What is the context for capturing? What is the reason? How will it be used in the future? Why was it interesting?

      She also describes how she collects notes in various formats (books, online articles, Kindle, Twitter, etc.) It primarily involves using Notion along with a variety of other sub-applications including Instapaper for sharing to Notion.

      Dramatically missing from this presentation is the answer to the question "why" collect all this stuff? How is she using it in the future? What is the overall value? She touches on writing the why for herself as she's taking notes, but I get the impression that she's not actively practicing what she preaches, and I suspect that many don't. This leaves me with the impression that she's collecting with no end goal, which for many may be fine.

      She's got a gaping hole in the processing section which likely needs a video unto itself and which would probably go a long way toward answer the "why" question above.

      In looking at her other videos, I see she's using the phrase "second brain" and words like productivity. There seems to be a high level of disconnect between those using "second brain" and the "why do this?" question other than the simple idea of "productivity" which seems to be a false trap that gets people into the mindset of being a collector for collections' sake.


      Almost hilariously she's got videos with titles like: - "I'm a productivity guru and I hate it." - "Productivity YouTube is brainwashing you"


      She's titled the final portion of the video "Outro" which is actually displayed on the video UI. This might be useful for production purposes but should be changed or omitted for actual consumption.


      The title "How I Remember Everything I Read" is pure clickbait here. It's more aptly titled, "How I Take and Save Notes". Where's the how I use this after? or how I review over it all to actually remember it/memorize it? There's nothing here to support this end of things which is the promise given in the title.

    1. t can’t be possible, because the texts were from his agent. A senior-aged Asexual woman, and I quote:“so it’s far-from-romantic.”Talk to any Asexual person, and they would be offended at the implication that Asexuals aren’t romantic or don’t date. It’s actually more-in-line with Aphobic rhetoric that Asexuality is born from somebodies lack of ability to form relationships due to looks or personality.

      This is a case of false generalization.

    1. markets enforce efficiency, so it's not possible that a company can have some major inefficiency and survive

      A memo to myself last week on this topic: people—even smart ones—still have trouble wrangling the implications of natural selection.

      Natural selection does not mean survival of the fittest. It means survival of the good enough.

      There was more to it than that, but funnily enough, there's this part:

      Dan Luu writes of Twitter and companies generally that they should continue to hire so long as it makes financial sense, and what makes financial sense is defined by an equation where savings at the margin is one component

      Understanding this is important, not just for the reasons that Dan mentions in the linked ("I could do that in a weekend!") piece, but because it gives companies a budget for inefficiency.

      Companies can make non-optimal decisions. (Deleterious ones, even.a^1 a^2)

      Instant death is not really a thing, although most misunderstandings demand that it is (as in the case of the parable of the "non-existent" 20-dollar bill). This is the timeless fallacy.

      When i was working this into a starter for a potential standalone piece, i drafted the following passage, hoping to use it as an intro:

      This is not a piece about biology. It is not even a piece about humans' understanding of biology. It is a piece about humans and humans' inability to grapple with particularly counterintuitive concepts (like natural selection).

      i also jotted down the phrase "cognitive fluency".

  6. Feb 2022
    1. qbatten annotates on Jan 11, 2022:

      Why note-taking is bad. Why you shouldn't take notes. Taking notes shouldn't be the end in itself!

      I'll agree that "taking notes shouldn't be the end in itself", but they've drawn the completely wrong conclusion about note taking being bad or that this flimsy argument indicates that one shouldn't take notes.

      Not everyone who wields a hammer is going to be a master craftsman and it's even less likely that someone who tinkers with one for a few months or even a few years will get there without some significant help. There's no evidence here of anything but desire for methods to work. Where was the deep practice, research into these systems described?

      From the start, the featured image in the original article of a crazy person's conception of a massive collection of piles of paper to represent the process is highly illustrative of so many misconceptions.

    2. https://reallifemag.com/rank-and-file/

      An interesting example of someone who fell into the trap of thinking that a particular tool or tools would magically make them smarter or help them do a particular line of work without showing any deep evidence of knowing what they were doing. The discussion here flows over a number of mixed note taking domains with no clear thrust for what they were using it pointedly for. The multiple directions and lack of experience likely doomed them to failure here.

    3. If I clicked through the labyrinth growing on my computer I could discover grottos and dusty corners I had already forgotten about.

      The unused accumulation of notes is the worst travesty. The collector's fallacy run amok.


      Why did this person fail here? What was their need/use case? Was it well-defined? Were the tools suited to their purpose?

    1. Just collecting unprocessedfleeting notes inevitably leads to chaos.

      Collecting fleeting notes and not processing them into something more useful and permanent will eventually end in abject failure.

      An example can be seen in the note taking of Joachim Jungius in 1657. He compiled approximately 150,000 slips (also known as scraps) with excerpts and ideas without any sort of order, arrangement, index or reference system. Following his death his students and heirs could make nothing of the massive "scrap heap". As a result, Vincent Placcius in De Arte Excerpendi (1689) specifically warns against this practice (p. 72).

      (cross reference from : https://hypothes.is/a/SyenKlO2Eeys0esqwOgjUw)

    2. Make permanent notes.

      The important part of permanent notes are generating your own ideas and connecting (linking them densely) into your note system. The linking part is important and can be the part that most using digital systems forget to do. In paper zettelkasten, one was forced to create the first link by placing the note into the system for the first time. This can specifically be seen in Niklas Luhmann's example where a note became a new area of its own or, far more likely, it was linked to prior ideas.

      By linking the idea to others within the system, it becomes more likely that the idea can have additional multiple contexts where it might be used and improve the fact that context shifts will prove more insight in the future.

      Additional links to subject headings, tags, categories, or other forms of taxonomy will also help to make sure the note isn't lost completely into the system. Links to the bibliographical references within the system are helpful as well, especially for later citation. Keep in mind that these categories and reference links aren't nearly as valuable as the other primary idea links.

      One can surely collect ideas and facts into their system, but these aren't as important or as interesting as one's own ideas and the things that are sparked and generated by them.

      Asking questions in permanent notes can be valuable as they can become the context for new research, projects, and writing. Open questions can be incredibly valuable for one's thinking and explorations.

  7. Jan 2022
    1. A Mental Squeeze Point is when your unsorted knowledge becomes so messy it overwhelms and discourages you. Either you are equipped with frameworks to overcome the squeeze point, or you are discouraged and possibly abandon your project.

      Cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/BuMcAnr4EeyxO-PwNBfPrg (Dan Allosso's analogy about the Kuiper Belt)

    1. crowds of people, with cattle being herded into transports; and people crammed into bunks, with chickens in a battery farm.

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Noncentral Fallacies: links humans to Nazis in the eyes of animals to create emotion.

    2. Other images compare children behind barbed wire with a picture of pigs looking out from behind bars;

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Confirmation bias? ignoring the fact that humans need food to survive so they compare it to babies being killed.

    3. what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust is what animals go through every day in factory farms."

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Red herring: Because animals are being treated like "what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust", people should be aware that the animals are having a holocaust of their own. This evidence is misleading because it is justifying Prescotts actions to move forward with the images.

    4. "We're asking people to recognise that what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust is what animals go through every day in factory farms."

      Faulty authority: They are asking the audience to agree with them simply because they are doing the right thing. In their opinion, calling upon the character of themselves as means to justify comparing factory farms to the Holocaust. They also do not provide any evidence for why they are qualified to speak on the subject. Instead using the words of others (second-hand evidence) to get across their point.

    5. "The fact is, all animals feel pain, fear and loneliness,"

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Faulty analogy, animals don't have the ability to comprehend things the way humans do.

    6. "The fact is, all animals feel pain, fear and loneliness,"

      Unfalsifiability:

      There is no way to prove this to be true, because there are so many animals, not all of them have been tested. As well as it is different from what we consider "fear and loneliness" because humans or any animal are unique, maybe similar, but do not think exactly the same.

      Noncentral Fallacy:

      Since the Holocaust already gives such an emotional reaction, by mentioning it even though there is no unbiased evidence to compare it to the animal industry, Peta tries to make it evidence for their argument when it has nothing to do with how animals are treated.

    7. The campaign, he added, was funded by a Jewish philanthropist, who wished to remain anonymous.

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      I think this is anonymous authority: says he was being funded by a Jewish philanthropist who wishes to stay anonymous. Either he wasn't actually being funded and he said he was to give him even more of a reason to continue with the project, or he was being respectful. probably shouldn't include this then.

    8. Mr Prescott is Jewish and lost several relatives in Nazi concentration camps. The campaign, he added, was funded by a Jewish philanthropist, who wished to remain anonymous. He said he had expected it to elicit criticism.

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      This has got to be some kind of fallacy. I'll add a comment later when I find it. But, Prescott being Jewish himself still went through with the project, even being the campaign creator. With the knowledge that these images would receive a lot of backlash, he still went through with the project without a single reason why he thought it was acceptable, except a quote from earlier where he compared humans to nazis when it comes to killing animals. He was also being funded by a Jewish philanthropist so maybe it was for the money.

    9. we want to those we decide are 'different or inferior' - is what allows us to commit atrocities against animals every single day."

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Red Herring (I think, cause this evidence is irrelevant): Matt Prescot explains that "we can do anything we want to those we decide are 'different or inferior'" which leads to his belief that because humans feel animals are inferior, humans kill them which is the "same mindset that made the holocaust possible".

    10. the Jewish Nobel laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      So a Jewish man even said that people are like nazis to humans? And then PETA took this and ran with It or something?

      FAYTHE SEALS: Genetic Fallacy

      Just because this person is of certain genetic descent he was considered good enough evidence to their cause. When in fact he has no actual information on the animals themselves. As well as just because he's Jewish he knows everything that went on during the Holocaust, he would be considered to have an argument if he, one research heavily and got stories from actual survivors or if he himself is a survivor. But since that is not clearly seen in the context this makes him an unreliable source.

    1. Why should feeling like a man—whatever that means—make someone a man? Why do our feelings determine reality on the question of sex, but on little else?

      Loaded question/hasty conclusion

    2. On the one hand, transgender activists want the authority of science as they make metaphysical claims, saying that science reveals gender identity to be innate and unchanging. On the other hand, they deny that biology is destiny, insisting that people are free to be who they want to be.

      Strawman analogy

    3. Gender identity, so understood, has no bearing at all on the meaning of “sex” or anything else. But transgender activists claim that a person’s self-professed “gender identity” is that person’s “sex.”

      hasty generalization

    4. Is there a gender binary or not? Somehow, it both does and does not exist, according to transgender activists.

      strawman/hasty conclusion

    5. If gender is a social construct, how can gender identity be innate and immutable?

      Strawman fallacy

    6. These are the dogmas they are likely to be catechized to profess.

      Argument by assertion

    7. But why should sex be determined differently in humans than in other mammals?

      Begging the Question/Hasty generalization

    8. Transgender activists don’t admit that this is a metaphysical claim. They don’t want to have the debate on the level of philosophy, so they dress it up as a scientific and medical claim

      Straw Man fallacy

    9. The movement has to keep patching and shoring up its beliefs, policing the faithful, coercing the heretics, and punishing apostates, because as soon as its furious efforts flag for a moment or someone successfully stands up to it, the whole charade is exposed. That’s what happens when your dogmas are so contrary to obvious, basic, everyday truths.

      Strawman fallacy

    10. the claims of transgender activists are confusing because they are philosophically incoherent. Activists rely on contradictory claims as needed to advance their position, but their ideology keeps evolving, so that even allies and LGBT organizations can get left behind as “progress” marches on.

      Appeal to incredulity/perfectionism

    11. Which is it? Is our gender identity biologically determined and immutable, or self-created and changeable? If the former, how do we account for people whose gender identity changes over time? Do these people have the wrong sense of gender at some time or other?

      Argument by asserstion/begging the question

    12. Determining reality is the heart of the matter

      strawman fallacy

    13. The challenge for activists is to explain why a person’s “real” sex is determined by an inner “gender identity,” but age and height and race and species are not determined by an inner sense of identity.

      Over generalization/strawman/ hasty generalization/ Plain wrong

    14. Apart from having a male body, what does it “feel like” to be a man? Apart from having a female body, what does it “feel like” to be a woman? What does it feel like to be both a man and a woman, or to be neither?

      Loaded question

    15. How can one’s identity be unchangeable (immutable) with respect to an ever-changing social construct? And if gender identity is innate, how can it be “fluid”?

      begging the question/loaded question

    16. They promote a radical expressive individualism in which people are free to do whatever they want and define the truth however they wish, yet they try ruthlessly to enforce acceptance of transgender ideology.

      Straw man fallacy Hasty conclusion

    17. Many of those who feel distress over their bodily sex know that they aren’t really the opposite sex, and do not wish to “transition.” They wish to receive help in coming to identify with and accept their bodily self. They don’t think their feelings of gender dysphoria define reality.

      Appeal to incredulity (Difficult to understand) Confirmation bias

      This is true but for the wrong reasons. Many trans people, myself included deal with not only Gender dysphoria, but imposter syndrome. This is only made worse by people like the author telling us things like these. Learning I am a boy and accepting that for myself took a long time, and coming out to others who reacted positivly has helped me tremendously. I am happier in myself and that's improved my relationships. I can't accept my body the way it is because it is objectivly female. I want my chest to be flat and it is objectivly not. I want to have a deep voice beecause I know and as you hear it you can hear, it is objectively high pitched. The person writing this article has clearly never spoken to an out trans person or tried to show compassion to them before coming to this conclusion.

    18. Activists never acknowledge those contradictions. Instead, they opportunistically rely on whichever claim is useful at any given moment.

      Straw man argument hasty generalization

    19. While activists claim that the possibilities for gender identity are rather expansive—man, woman, both, neither—they also insist that gender identity is innate, or established at a very young age, and thereafter immutable.

      Perfectionism

    20. But even this one violates current dogma. Some activists have complained that the Genderbread Person looks overly male.

      Being very nitpicky.Definitely check for something here. Maybe relevance?

    21. Does the proper dosage of medicine depend on the patient’s sex or gender identity?

      Loaded question.

      Also the answer is a person's hormone levels.

    1. “To Animals, All People Are Nazis”

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Noncentral Fallacies: links humans to Nazis in the eyes of animals to create emotion.

    2. "The fact is, all animals feel pain, fear and loneliness,"

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Faulty analogy, animals don't have the ability to comprehend things the way humans do.

    3. that we can do anything we want to those we decide are 'different or inferior' - is whatallows us to commit atrocities against animals every single day."

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Red Herring (I think, cause this evidence is irrelevant): Matt Prescot explains that "we can do anything we want to those we decide are 'different or inferior'" which leads to his belief that because humans feel animals are inferior, humans kill them which is the "same mindset that made the holocaust possible".

    4. Mr Prescott is Jewish and lost several relatives in Nazi concentration camps. The campaign, headded, was funded by a Jewish philanthropist, who wished to remain anonymous. He said hehad expected it to elicit criticism.

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      This has got to be some kind of fallacy. I'll add a comment later when I find it. But, Prescott being Jewish himself still went through with the project, even being the campaign creator. With the knowledge that these images would receive a lot of backlash, he still went through with the project without a single reason why he thought it was acceptable, except a quote from earlier where he compared humans to nazis when it comes to killing animals. He was also being funded by a Jewish philanthropist so maybe it was for the money.

    5. what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust is what animals go through every dayin factory farms."

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Red herring: Because animals are being treated like "what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust", people should be aware that the animals are having a holocaust of their own. This evidence is misleading because it is justifying Prescotts actions to move forward with the images.

    6. “Baby Butchers”

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      Confirmation bias? ignoring the fact that humans need food to survive so they compare it to babies being killed.

    7. The campaign, headded, was funded by a Jewish philanthropist, who wished to remain anonymous.

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      I think this is anonymous authority: says he was being funded by a Jewish philanthropist who wishes to stay anonymous. Either he wasn't actually being funded and he said he was to give him even more of a reason to continue with the project, or he was being respectful. probably shouldn't include this then.

    8. We're asking people to recognizethat what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust is what animals go through every dayin factory farms."

      Faulty authority:

      They are asking the audience to agree with them simply because they are doing the right thing. In their opinion, calling upon the character of themselves as means to justify comparing factory farms to the Holocaust. They also do not provide any evidence for why they are qualified to speak on the subject. Instead using the words of others (second-hand evidence) to get across their point.

    9. "The fact is, all animals feel pain, fear and loneliness,"

      Unfalsifiability:

      There is no way to prove this to be true, because there are so many animals, not all of them have been tested. As well as it is different from what we consider "fear and loneliness" because humans or any animal are unique, maybe similar, but do not think exactly the same.

      Noncentral Fallacy:

      Since the Holocaust already gives such an emotional reaction, by mentioning it even though there is no unbiased evidence to compare it to the animal industry, Peta tries to make it evidence for their argument when it has nothing to do with how animals are treated.

    10. ewish Nobel laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      So a Jewish man even said that people are like nazis to humans? And then PETA took this and ran with It or something?

      FAYTHE SEALS: Genetic Fallacy

      Just because this person is of certain genetic descent he was considered good enough evidence to their cause. When in fact he has no actual information on the animals themselves. As well as just because he's Jewish he knows everything that went on during the Holocaust, he would be considered to have an argument if he, one research heavily and got stories from actual survivors or if he himself is a survivor. But since that is not clearly seen in the context this makes him an unreliable source.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. these covid concentration camps are going to be ramped up into extermination / death camps

      Argument by assertion fallacy and claim of fact: Repeating the claim again and again, does not make it true.

    2. As NewsPunch wrote just yesterday, “Democrats File New Bill Authorizing ‘Strike Force’ to Imprison Unjabbed Families: ‘Our Internment Camps Are Ready’”

      False authority, second-hand evidence: According to Wikipedia, "NewsPunch is a Los Angeles-based fake news website known for spreading conspiracy theories, political misinformation, and hoaxes,". NewsPunch is definitely not a reliable source to cite.

    3. As Jen Psaki said herself, “Our work doesn’t stop there and we are going to continue to press to get 12-18-year olds vaccinated… that’s one of the reasons why we initiated these strike forces to go into communities…” Here’s the video of Psaki saying this, in case you find it hard to believe:

      Straw man fallacy, second-hand evidence: While it is true that Psaki said this, NaturalNews is misrepresenting what she is truly saying. According to WebMD, the COVID-19 strike forces are "...made up of health and logistics experts from several federal agencies, will conduct coronavirus testing, distribute medicines designed to fight the virus and boost local and state efforts to increase vaccinations,". They are not forcing people to take "KILL SHOTS".

    4. The governments of the world are deliberately trying to exterminate the human race

      Slippery slope fallacy, claim of fact

    5. it’s people with natural immunity.

      Appeal to nature: Assuming that having "natural" immunity is better than having immunity from a vaccine.

      According to Hopkins Medicine "New studies show that natural immunity to the coronavirus weakens (wanes) over time,".

    6. Democrats have built death camps in America

      Argument by assertion fallacy and claim of fact: Restating this claim once again.

    7. “health officers” (Democrat vaccine Gestapo)

      Faulty analogy: Comparing health officers to Nazi police is illogical.

    8. The vaccine holocaust has arrived

      Faulty analogy: Comparing a vaccine that has been proven to protect people against a virus to genocide is illogical.

    9. who did nothing to stop the CHAZ seizing of downtown Seattle (and who is clearly working for the radical Marxist Left)

      Red herring: The Capitol Hill Organized Protest is irrelevent to the author's argument about "covid concentration camps".

    1. Jewish Nobel laureate Isaac Bashevis Singe

      ANJIELI FAIRBANKS:

      So a Jewish man even said that people are like nazis to humans? And then PETA took this and ran with It or something?

      FAYTHE SEALS: Genetic Fallacy

      Just because this person is of certain genetic descent he was considered good enough evidence to their cause. When in fact he has no actual information on the animals themselves. As well as just because he's Jewish he knows everything that went on during the Holocaust, he would be considered to have an argument if he, one research heavily and got stories from actual survivors or if he himself is a survivor. But since that is not clearly seen in the context this makes him an unreliable source.

    2. "We're asking people to recognizethat what Jews and others went through in the Holocaust is what animals go through every dayin factory farms."

      Faulty authority:

      They are asking the audience to agree with them simply because they are doing the right thing. In their opinion, calling upon the character of themselves as means to justify comparing factory farms to the Holocaust. They also do not provide any evidence for why they are qualified to speak on the subject. Instead using the words of others (second-hand evidence) to get across their point.

    3. The fact is, all animals feel pain, fear and loneliness,"

      Unfalsifiability:

      There is no way to prove this to be true, because there are so many animals, not all of them have been tested. As well as it is different from what we consider "fear and loneliness" because humans or any animal are unique, maybe similar, but do not think exactly the same.

      Noncentral Fallacy:

      Since the Holocaust already gives such an emotional reaction, by mentioning it even though there is no unbiased evidence to compare it to the animal industry, Peta tries to make it evidence for their argument when it has nothing to do with how animals are treated.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. notion it’s for the younger crowd.

      Argument by assertion

    2. I am constantly put off by the use of today’s street talk.Here’s an example from her chart topping “The 1″:I’m doing good, I’m on some new sh*tBeen saying “yes” instead of “no”I thought I saw you at the bus stop, I didn’t though.There are other songs with lyrics that more miss than hit. Here’s an example from “August”:Salt air, and the rust on your doorI never needed anything more

      Confirmation bias

    3. Rolling Stone said, “It’s going to take weeks, if not decades, to puzzle out all the intricately interwoven narrative details of these songs. "

      Anonymous authority

    4. knowing she worked with Aaron Dessner of The National, I had hopes this would be the version of T.Swift I truly enjoyed.

      Appeal to tradition

    5. And here’s where my age comes in:

      circular reasoning- "Or maybe it's because I'm a guy, the ripe old age of 31."

    6. Or maybe it’s because I’m a guy, the ripe old age of 31.

      circular reasoning- "And here's where my age comes in"

    7. If that means more of today’s generation will start broadening their music horizons beyond the radio, and giving folk and other genres a try, then great.

      Middle Ground Fallacy

  8. Dec 2021
    1. calm manner in which these demonstrations have been handled

      Ambiguity fallacy: Calling the management of protests "calm" when most of the nation has seen fire hoses and police dogs is part of what undermined the clergymen's argument. They may have seen a calm response prior to April 12, but the nation saw violence afterward.

    2. e also point out that such actions as incite to hatred and violence, however technically peaceful those actions may be, have not contributed to the resolution of our local problems

      Tu quoque: Blaming nonviolent protesters for "inciting hatred and violence" basically blames the victims of racism for the hatred of racists.

    3. ecent public events

      Confirmation Bias: Selecting the one recent success as evidence that no action is needed (and ignoring lots of evidence that not much has changed).

    4. racial problems

      Ambiguity: not race causing the problems, but racism

    5. face facts.

      Begging the question: Calling subjective details "facts" is dubious evidence upon which to make any claim of value.

  9. Nov 2021
    1. Calling a software convention "pretty 90s" somewhat undermines your position. Quite a lot of well-designed software components are older than that. If something is problematic, it would be more useful to argue its faults. When someone cites age to justify change, I usually find that they're inexperienced and don't fully understand the issues or how their proposed change would impact other people.
  10. Oct 2021
    1. We must beware of a certain craze for collecting which sometimes takes possession of those who make notes.
    2. Avoid caprice in everything. Just as reading is food, and memory a rich possession that becomes part of the personality, notes also are storehouses of nourishment and of personality. Reading, memory, notes should all complete us, should there- fore be like us, have something of our self, our r6le, our yocation; they should correspond to what we are aiming at and to the form of external activity by which we can and will realize it.

      Solid advice for note taking.

      This reasoning seems to be missing from writers like Ryan Holiday who just give the advice without the underlying reason why.

    Tags

    Annotators

  11. Sep 2021
    1. If there were more low hanging fruit to do more on this land they would be doing these opportunities by now

      This commenter is committing what I call "the timeless fallacy". It's not that far off from people who don't "get" evolution by natural selection—which is odd, because most of the people who commit the timeless fallacy in venues like this almost certainly do understand it.

  12. Aug 2021
  13. Jul 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘@ToddHorowitz3 I think that attribution is hard to make. I have no doubt they’re systematically promoted by bad faith actors, but I think it’s much harder to feel confident about all those who repeat them. But the rather extensive public discussion of efficacy does make this case seem unlikely’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 15 July 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1415364895046963205

  14. May 2021
    1. The Last Crusidual. (2021, February 2). @SciBeh @MichaelPaulEdw1 @ToddHorowitz3 @richarddmorey you can’t have any form of evidence. If you concider any form of evidence, than what is talked about than isn’t anymore what the falacy sais. [Tweet]. @islaut1. https://twitter.com/islaut1/status/1356529266519924736

  15. Apr 2021
  16. Mar 2021
  17. Feb 2021
  18. Dec 2020
  19. Nov 2020
    1. I'm still calling this v1.00 as this is what will be included in the first print run.

      There seems to be an artificial pressure and a false assumption that the version that gets printed and included in the box be the "magic number" 1.00.

      But I think there is absolutely nothing bad or to be ashamed of to have the version number printed in the rule book be 1.47 or even 2.0. (Or, of course, you could just not print it at all.) It's just being transparent/honest about how many versions/revisions you've made. 

  20. Oct 2020
  21. Sep 2020
    1. But because it is espoused by so many leading members of the JavaScript community, scrutiny is all too rarely applied.
    2. It’s written by Sindre Sorhus, whose npm profile is enough to make all but the most prolific developer feel wholly inadequate, and so carries with it a degree of authority.
  22. Aug 2020
  23. May 2020
  24. Apr 2020
    1. Despite their awarded diplomas in the art of writing, you'd be surprised at how many editors and journalists in the United States make English mistakes. For instance, "an" is still often coupled with words that begin with an "H" sound, even though this is improper. I'd advise against treating material from news sources as if it were error-free or even a higher authority on grammar.
  25. Mar 2020
  26. Jan 2019
  27. Mar 2018
    1. argument from authority (e.g., President Richard Nixon should be re-elected because he has a secret plan to end the war in Southeast Asia — but because it was secret, there was no way for the electorate to evaluate it on its merits; the argument amounted to trusting him because he was President: a mistake, as it turned out)

      Everytime I hear Trump say "trust me", I think of this.

  28. Sep 2016
    1. Over the years the NCAA has changed rules that do not always align with pure amateurism. According to Zimbalist, in 1973 the NCAA altered scholarship terms so that they needed to be renewed each year.[6] This would imply that no athletes position was safe, a notion that does not fit with the love of the game

      implying an athletes position is not safe does not correlate with loving the game

  29. Feb 2016
    1. The Democrats wanted to keep the issue alive to use it as a wedge against the Republicans and to establish themselves as owners of the Hispanic vote.

      This seems hackish. It seems to me the Democrats have a very clear solution to this issue and would love to put it to rest. The Republicans, however, won't allow it.

  30. Nov 2013
    1. For all that, Quintilian continues and main-tains his own opinion that since dialectic is a virtue, so therefore is rhetoric. Quintilian should turn the whole thing around and should more correctly conclude that since dialectic is not a moral virtue which can shape a good man, so neither is rhetoric.

      Dictating opinion? Hmmm, okay. By definition, opinion is grounded in personal anecdote and perception. This follows the same kind of logic. "He says that X = Y and therefore so does Z. But no! X=Y so W=Z." This is the overall issue with syllogisms: making inferences. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

  31. Sep 2013
    1. For if I have had the affection of men who have received rewards in recognition of excellence, but have nothing in common with the sycophant, then how, in all reason, could you judge me to be a corrupter of youth?

      Logically flawed.

    2. in a word, it smothers truth, and pouring false ideas into our ears, it leaves no man among our citizens secure from an unjust death

      Slippery slope fallacy. Motivating by fear

    3. Indeed no one may rely on the honesty of his life as a guarantee that he will be able to live securely in Athens; for the men who have chosen to neglect what is their own and to plot against what belongs to others do not keep their hands off citizens who live soberly and bring before you only those who do evil; on the contrary, they advertise their powers in their attacks upon men who are entirely innocent, and so get more money from those who are clearly guilty.

      I know this is going somewhere, Boyle. So please don't take this as a comment like hating repetition. Okay, we good? Good. So far this entire reading is nothing but Tu Quoque. I am sure Isocrates is going to eventually explain himself, but this is all the logical fallacy of using critique to critique. Don't yell at me!

    4. For this informer, himself delivering a composed speech, has said more in complaint of my compositions than upon all other points

      argumentum ad hominem