957 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. -It looks like the system is also very similar to Luhmann’s Zettelkasten

      Ryan Holiday's system puts some of the work farther from the note taking origin compared with Nicholas Luhmann's system which places more of it up front.

      How, if at all, do the payoffs from doing each of these vary for the end user of the system?

    1. Whether or not a note maker increases their knowledge "sufficiently" at the time of import or at the time of writing longer works, is a moot point. So long as it happens.

      "So long as it happens." And here lies the rub: when will you put in the work to make the note useful and actionable? Will it be now or later?

      Some notes are certainly more mission critical than others. Some work towards one's life's work while others are tidbits which may be useful at a later time. Distinguishing along this spectrum isn't always easy, particular in build a bottom up view of one's research.

    2. folgezettel pushes the note maker toward making at least one connection at the time of import.

      There is a difference between the sorts of links one might make when placing an idea into an (analog) zettelkasten. A folgezettel link is more valuable than a simple tag/category link because it places an idea into a more specific neighborhood than any handful of tags. This is one of the benefits of a Luhmann-artig ZK system over a more traditional commonplace one, particularly when the work is done up front instead of being punted to a later time.

      For those with a 1A2B3Z linking system (versus a pure decimal system), it may be more difficult to insert a card before other cards rather than after them because of the potential gymnastics of numbering and the natural tendency to put things into a continuing linear order.

      See also: - https://hypothes.is/a/ToqCPq1bEe2Q0b88j4whwQ - https://hyp.is/WtB2AqmlEe2wvCsB5ZyL5A/docdrop.org/download_annotation_doc/Introduction-to-Luhmanns-Zette---Ludecke-Daniel-h4nh8.pdf

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iRzF_ZAdUI

      Scott Sheper demonstrates one of the lowest forms of zettelkasten: simply indexing an idea from a book into one's index. This includes skipping the step of excerpting the idea into it's own card.

      He describes it as zettelkasten knowledge building for busy people. It's definitely a hard turn from his all-in Luhmann-esque method.

      In the end it comes down to where one puts in the work. Saving the work of having done some reading for a small idea one may tangentially reference later is most of the distance, but he's still going to have to do more work later to use the idea.

  2. Sep 2023
    1. As the root teacher of The Work That Reconnects, Joanna has created a ground-breaking framework for personal and social change, as well as a powerful workshop methodology for its application.
    1. The dualism of scientific materialism and its one-person psychologies are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
      • for: dualism, dualism - psychology, unintended consequences, unintended consequences - dualism in psychology, progress trap, progress trap - dualism in psychology

      • paraphrase

        • The dualism of scientific materialism gives rise to one-person psychologies
          • and are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
        • For instance, a good deal of the historical denial of the role of psychological and social trauma has been traced
          • back to the Freudian model’s almost exclusive focus on the internal world;
            • the actual impact of others and society has been, as a result, relatively ignored.
        • Modern psychiatry, which accepts the same philosophical model but changes the level of explanation, is just as culpable.
        • Likewise CBT, with its focus on dysfunctional thought patterns and rational remedies administered from the outside, also follows the same misguided philosophy.
      • question

        • what are concrete ways this has caused harm?
      • future work
        • perform literature review on case studies where Winnicott's approach has been a more constructive therapeutic one
  3. Aug 2023
    1. The industrial worker now has twentyhours of free time a week that his grandfather did not have.

      Where does this wealth ultimately go in the long run? Not to the worker, but primarily to the corporation competing against them for the added value.

    2. This set of books is offered not merely as an object uponwhich leisure may be expended, but also as a means to thehumanization of work through understanding.16

      Purpose of the Great Books of the Western World

    3. Whatever work there is should have as much meaning aspossible. Wherever possible, workmen should be artists; theirwork should be the application of knowledge or science andknown and enjoyed by them as such. They should, if possi-ble, know what they are doing, why what they are doing hasthe results it has, why they are doing it, and what constitutesthe goodness of the things produced. They should understandwhat happens to what they produce, why it happens in thatway, and how to improve what happens. They should under-stand their relations to others co-operating in a given process,the relation of that process to other processes, the pattern of-them all as constituting the economy of the nation, and thebearing of the economy on the social, moral, and politicallife of the nation and the world. Work would be humanizedif understanding of all these kinds were in it and around it.

      Is this the same sort of shift in work noticed by Barak Obama in his four part documentary series Working: What We Do All Day which aired on Netflix in 2023?

      Politicians should focus here especially.

    4. Dewey's chief reason for this recommendation is found inhis psychology of learning. "An occupation is a continuousactivity having a purpose. Education through occupations con-sequently combines within itself more of the factors condu-cive to learning than any other method. It calls instincts andhabits into play; it is a foe to passive receptivity. It has anend in view; results are to be accomplished. Hence it appealsto thought; it demands that an idea of an end be steadilymaintained, so that activity must be progressive, leadingfrom one stage to another; observation and ingenuity are re-quired at each stage to overcome obstacles and to discoverand readjust means of execution.

      Purpose for the work involved or purpose for the worker? Does it show a shift to living to work or working to live here?

    1. The Work That Reconnects

      spiral of practices described, with connected resources

    2. The Work That Reconnects, based in the teachings of Joanna Macy, follows a Spiral of practices: Gratitude, Honoring Our Pain for the World, Seeing with New/Ancient Eyes, and Going Forth.

      The Work That Reconnects Website

    1. This method is interesting, I like the aesthetics of such commonplace books. However, in terms of functionality, it is nearly fully replaced with the Antinet Zettelkasten method. Perhaps I could use some of this to improve my journals though? In addition, this does inspire me to create progressive summarization pages of my ideas and concepts, contained in Sage Scientia, in Notion or Obsidian.

      A method such as this, or Zettelkasten, can help create theoretical expertship... It might not be the MOST EFFICIENT, but it is highly effective.

    1. Upton Sinclair ran for Governor of California in the 1930s, and the coverage he received from newspapers was unsympathetic. Yet, in 1934 some California papers published installments from his forthcoming book about the ill-fated campaign titled “I, Candidate for Governor, and How I Got Licked”. Emphasis added to excerpts by QI:[1] 1934 December 11, Oakland Tribune, I, Candidate for Governor and How I Got Licked by Upton Sinclair, Quote Page 19, Column 3, Oakland, California. (Newspapers_com) I used to say to our audiences: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!”

      via https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/30/salary/

      Some underlying tension for the question of identity/misinformation and personal politics vis-a-vis work and one's identity generated via work.

    1. A Fred-box could be very useful. This contains cards with useful snippets of thought, very small usually, that don't need a particular ordering or connection of thought but are worth it to be reminded of every now and then, a shuffle if it were.

      If need be used in connective thought as well, the content could be copied over into an Antinet entry as well.

  4. Jul 2023
    1. staff are more open to returning to the office if it is out of choice, rather than forced
    2. Unispace finds that nearly half (42%) of companies that mandated office returns witnessed a higher level of employee attrition than they had anticipated. And almost a third (29%) of companies enforcing office returns are struggling with recruitment. Imagine that — nearly half!
    1. You can tell people just like I have you to focus their attention, choose a target. Imagine there's a spotlight shining just on it. Don't pay much attention to what's in your periphery almost as if you have like blinders on, right? So don't pay attention to those distractors. People can do that. We have them talk to us about like, well, what is it that you're focused on? What's catching your attention right now? Those are easy instructions to understand and it's easy to make your eyes do it. What's important though is that that's not what their eyes do naturally. When they're walking or when they're running, people do take a sort of wider perspective. They broaden their scope of attention relative to what these instructions are having them do. And when we taught people that narrowed style of attention, what we found is that they moved 23% faster in this course that we had set up. From the start line to the finish line, it was always exactly the same distance. And we were using our stop watches to see how fast did they move. They moved 23% faster and they said it hurt 17% less. Right? So exactly the same actual experience, but subjectively it was easier and they performed better. They increase the efficiency of this particular exercise.

      (24:58) In order to perform significantly better, you need to FOCUS your attention on a single thing only. Multitasking won't work, and thinking about different things at once also doesn't work. Set up your environment to foster this insane level of focus.

  5. Jun 2023
    1. When it comes to thinking, the Zettelkasten solves an important issue which is the problem of scope, which is impossible at the current moment in mindmapping software such as Concepts.

      Mainly, Zettelkasten allows you gain a birds-eye holistic view of a topic, branch, or line of thought, while allowing you to at the same time also gain a microscopic view of an "atomic" idea within that thought-stream, therefore creating virtually infinite zoom-in and zoom-out capability. This is very, very, beneficial to the process of deep thinking and intellectual work.

    2. Think of branches not as collections, but rather as conversations

      When a branch starts to build, or prove itself, then ask the question (before indexing): "What is the conversation that is building here?"

      Also related to Sönke Ahrens' maxim of seeking Disconfirming Information to counter Confirmation Bias. By thinking of branches as conversations instead of collectives, you are also more inclined to put disconfirming information within the branch.

    1. The author, Rediscovering Analog, reads a book at least twice, usually. He first reads it mainly for pleasure, just to enjoy it and to see what's in it. During the second time, if applicable, he goes through the book using intellectual (or learning) systems and methodologies to extract value from the book.

      The first pass, which the author terms Scouting, is thus namely for enjoyment, but keeping in mind what might be valuable or interesting that will be valuable in the future, basically an unguided open ear. He has a list of scouted books in each section of the Zettelkasten that might be relevant to the section. What he does is have a stack of physical cards there with just the name of the book and the author, without anything else. Then when author proceeds to extract value from the book, he takes the card out and puts it in the respective book. Afterwards throwing this particular card into the trash. It's a form of the Anti-Library.

      ( Personally, I would include an appropriate reading cost and a level on Adler's hierarchy of books. In addition, I would make sure that my process of orientation, in the Inquiry-Based Learning framework, has been completed before I put it as a book within the Anti-Library. )


      This may not be the most efficient for the purpose of acquiring value, but efficiency is not all there is. Enjoyment is a big part of intellectual work as well, as Antonin Sertillanges argues in his book The Intellectual Life: Its spirit, methods, conditions, as well as Mihaly Csikszentmihaliy in his book Flow.

    1. One thing that I got from this video, implicitly, is that one shouldn't be restrained by (implicit) rules they set for themselves.

      For example, I used to be enslaved by my love for data, which hindered me from learning efficiently by reading non-linearly... If I read non-linearly, I couldn't track my pages. So I had to let go of that to make progress. (10X mindset).

      In the same way, don't be enslaved by tools, methods, and principles... Unless they have clear reasoning behind them, and even then you can break the "rules".

    1. (14:20-19:00) Dopamine Prediction Error is explained by Andrew Huberman in the following way: When we anticipate something exciting dopamine levels rise and rise, but when we fail it drops below baseline, decreasing motivation and drive immensely, sometimes even causing us to get sad. However, when we succeed, dopamine rises even higher, increasing our drive and motivation significantly... This is the idea that successes build upon each other, and why celebrating the "marginal gains" is a very powerful tool to build momentum and actually make progress. Surprise increases this effect even more: big dopamine hit, when you don't anticipate it.

      Social Media algorithms make heavy use of this principle, therefore enslaving its user, in particular infinite scrolling platforms such as TikTok... Your dopamine levels rise as you're looking for that one thing you like, but it drops because you don't always have that one golden nugget. Then it rises once in a while when you find it. This contrast creates an illusion of enjoyment and traps the user in an infinite search of great content, especially when it's shortform. It makes you waste time so effectively. This is related to getting the success mindset of preferring delayed gratification over instant gratification.


      It would be useful to reflect and introspect on your dopaminic baseline, and see what actually increases and decreases your dopamine, in addition to whether or not these things help to achieve your ambitions. As a high dopaminic baseline (which means your dopamine circuit is getting used to high hits from things as playing games, watching shortform content, watching porn) decreases your ability to focus for long amounts of time (attention span), and by extent your ability to learn and eventually reach success. Studying and learning can actually be fun, if your dopamine levels are managed properly, meaning you don't often engage in very high-dopamine emitting activities. You want your brain to be used to the low amounts of dopamine that studying gives. A framework to help with this reflection would be Kolb's.

      A short-term dopamine reset is to not use the tool or device for about half an hour to an hour (or do NSDR). However, this is not a long-term solution.

    2. Huberman states that doing these 4 things consistently and regularly, as a habit, might seem to take time, therefore decreasing performance. BUT, in reality they increase performance, as these things improve your health, focus, and awareness significantly.

      Therefore they are so-called Performance Enablers

    3. The 4 (behavioral) keypoints for great physical and mental as well as cognitive health:

      One) (2:00-4:05) View sunlight early in the day. The light needs to reach the eyes--increasing alertness, mood, and focus, through certain receptors. Also increases sleep quality at night, according to Huberman. Ideally five to ten minutes on a clear day, and ten to twenty minutes on an overcast day. No sunglasses, and certainly not through windows and windshields. If no sun is out yet, use artificial bright light. Do this daily.

      Two) (4:05-6:10) Do physical exercise each and every day. Doesn't have to be super intense. Huberman recommends zone two cardiovascular exercise. Walking very fast, running, cycling, rowing, swimming are examples. He says to get at least between 150 and 200 minutes of this exercise per week. Some resistance training as well for longevity and wellbeing, increases metabolism as well. Do this at least every other day, according to Huberman. Huberman alternates each day between cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.

      Three) (6:20-9:10) People should have access to a rapid de-stress protocol or tools. This should be able to do quickly and instantly, without friction. You can just do one breath for destress. ( Deep long breath through nose, one quick breath in nose to completely fill the longs, and then breathe out through mouth long.)

      Four) (9:12-14:00) To have a deliberate rewiring nervous system protocol to use. A thing that can be done is NSDR (Non-Sleep Deep Rest protocol), this is specifically to increase energy.

      Ideally the NSDR should be done after each learning session as well to imitate deep sleep (REM) and therefore accelerate neuroplasticity and thus rewire the nervous system; increasing the strength of connections between neurons and therefore increase retention significantly.

      NSDR is also a process of autonomity and control, it allows one to find that they are in control of their body and brain. It makes one realize that external factors don't necessarily have influence. According to Huberman, NSDR even replenishes dopamine when it is depleted, making it also suitable for increasing motivation.

    1. Deep focus is possible. Take care of the base (the body): • Nutrition • Sleep • Exercise Then train your focus by observing the mind. It gets easily distracted. You can be aware of this. And suddenly you are in flow, without the 'You' being there.

      Test Twitter Two

    1. Focus is a muscle. Start with 4 sets of 20 minutes. Rest between sets. Progressive overload still applies to mental lifting. When you get stronger, add more weight. Increase to 4 sets of 45 minutes. Train your focus to hit your ideal financial physique in record time.

      Test Twitter Annotation

      • reduce perceived exertion (change positions) & reduce perceived effort (change places)
      • main environment for (1) sitting (2) standing (3) walking
      • standing set-up: motion board (& budget standing desk with books etc.)
      • changing walking set-ups
      • change working environments that are different from each other (for novelty)
      • (1) three main environments to change positions (dip in energy/work is getting hard) (2) three additional environments to change places (when fatigue kicks in)
      • take breaks that are "boring" (do nothing, stare at wall, break activities: stretching, breathing, meditating)
      • release from flow, go into recovery, don't snap
      • less hours forces the person the be more effective, you also get obligations done within 3/4 hour block, and afterward, you can process and think about deeper things, be spontaneous, still do work, but it is not a obligation (work as leisure, as well?)
      • waking up in 90 sec doing most important work bec mornings your "flow proneness" is high
      • recovery is important, as well (morning routines should help with flow proneness and recovery, but bec you are flow prone in the morning, do the work, and do recovery in other parts)
      • plan most important task (thing you will do after waking) the night before
    1. e dal rapportino quotidiano delle prestazioni

      The ‘registro di Kommando e rapportino quotidiano delle prestazioni’ are the very basic forms of labour narrative alluded to in the text, which can be read itself as a sort of counter-narrative to those.

      EB

    2. – Ihr Doktoren! Ihr Intelligenten! – sghignazzava ogni giorno vedendoli accalcarsi colle gamelle tese alla distribuzione del rancio

      This is a further instance of the tension between manual and intellectual labour throughout the book and chapter.

      EB

    3. e la sua tecnica di aguzzino esperto e consumato

      In I sommersi e i salvati, Levi discusses the obsession for ‘il lavoro ben fatto’:

      L’amore per il lavoro ben fatto è una virtù fortemente ambigua. Ha animato Michelangelo fino ai suoi ultimi giorni, ma anche Stangl, il diligentissimo carnefice di Treblinka, replica con stizza alla sua intervistatrice: 'Tutto ciò che facevo di mia libera volontà dovevo farlo il meglio che potevo. Sono fatto così'. Della stessa virtù va fiero Rudolf Höss, il comandante di Auschwitz, quando racconta il travaglio creativo che lo condusse ad inventare le camere a gas. (OC II, 1223).

      EB

    4. non lavora manualmente, ha mano libera

      This is interesting wording on hands: ‘non lavora manualmente, ha mano libera’. Hands, and manual work, have metaphorical value in this case, and are of central importance for Levi (see the documentary, Le mani di Primo Levi).

      EB

    5. la carica di Pikolo, vale a dire di fattorino-scritturale, addetto alla pulizia della baracca, alle consegne degli attrezzi, alla lavatura delle gamelle, alla contabilità delle ore di lavoro del Kommando

      The character of Pikolo is introduced by listing his roles as part of the workforce and hierarchy in the camp.

      EB

    6. La polvere di ruggine ci bruciava sotto le palpebre

      Further in relation to labour, and to the infernal character of this chapter, might we note a possible reference to Dante’s Frate Alberigo (Inf. 33, 109-57) in the ‘polvere di ruggine [che] ci bruciava sotto le palpebre’?

      EB

    7. raschiare e pulire l’interno di una cisterna interrata

      The theme of labour permeates the entire fabric of this chapter, in the context of a book which devotes a lot of attention to forced labour and its material conditions as a means for the destruction of humanity (see, for example, in the opening poem, ‘Considerate se questo è un uomo | che lavora nel fango’ (OC I, 139)). In this respect, it is also interesting to consider the implications of the infernal ‘verticality’ of Se questo è un uomo (and this chapter in particular) in relation to labour in the subsurface (see Karen Pinkus, Subsurface (2023)).

      EB

    8. almeno un’ora

      Levi wrote this chapter in early 1946, apparently during a brief 45-minute lunch break at the Montecatini chemical plant at Avigliana, outside Turin, where he was then working (e.g. OC I, 1469). It is interesting to note that the chapter tells the story of another 'lunch break', in another chemical--industrial plant, an unimaginably darker, distant workplace.

      RG

    9. Oscillò la scaletta di corda che pendeva dal portello

      The chapter opens with Levi and his fellow prisoners working below ground in an underground cistern or tank and ends with the quotation from Dante about the sea closing over Ulysses’ and his companions’ heads. These two moments are further connected as the description of the tank – ‘scaletta di corda’ and ‘portello’, literally ‘hatch’ rather than ‘manhole’ – conjures up the image of a ship.

      EL

    10. una cisterna interrata

      In the previous chapter, ‘Esame di chimica’, Primo has been admitted, through a kind of perverse and humiliating ‘chemistry examination’ carried out by Nazi official Herr Doktor Pannwitz, to a so-called ‘Chemical Kommando’. This Kommando will work, notionally, in a laboratory of the Buna-Werke industrial rubber plant, under construction by IG Farben next to the Monowitz-Auschwitz III concentration camp (and other POW and labour camps). The ‘cistern’ here is not a laboratory setting, but is probably a work site within the Buna complex.

      Monowitz was the largest of the extensive network of so-called satellite- or sub-camps beyond Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau. For more information on Monowitz, see the Subcamps of Auschwitz project.

      RG

    1. Digital nomads must earn at least €2,800 per month to qualify for its new visa, around four times Portugal’s minimum wage. According to Nomad List nearly 16,000 people were remote working in Lisbon last December, where they now find themselves blamed for rocketing rents and house prices.

      Digital nomads in Portugal

    2. According to a March survey, 36 per cent of digital nomads have an annual income of between $100,000 and $250,000. Another eight per cent earn between $250,000 and one million. Attracted by these bank balances, dozens of countries have now introduced so-called “digital nomad visas” (permitting extended stays to work remotely).

      Income of digital nomads

    1. According to Henderson, there are three steps to keeping a commonplace book:

      1) Read (Consume)

      "Commonplace books begin with observation."

      2) Capture (Write) Always also capture the source.

      3) Reflect Write own thoughts about the material. Synthesize, think.

      I'd personally use a digital commonplace book (hypothes.is), like Chris Aldrich explains, as my capture method and my Antinet Zettelkasten as my reflect methodology. This way the commonplace book fosters what Luhmann would call the thought rumination process.

    1. A commonplace book, according to Jared Henderson, is a way to not collect own thoughts (though sometimes it is) but rather to collect thoughts by others that you deem interesting.

    1. The German word 'Arbeit', work, descends from Porto-Germanic *arbaidiz, which meant hardship or suffering. Going a couple of thousand years further back in time, the ancestor of arbaidiz was Porto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos, which mean orphan or slave. 'Orphan' has the same root via Latin. So Arbeit <> orphan: distant cousins. 'Arbeit' did have a relative in Old English too: it was 'earfoþe', difficult, hard
  6. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. And that is part of the larger pattern of the appeal of a new online collectivismthat is nothing less than a resurgence of the idea that the collective is all-wis

      Lanier is saying that the intelligence from the collective is harmful but I feel like throughout my life I have been taught to use other people's knowledge to help me and that teamwork is very important. This made me think of the saying my elementary and middle school teachers have taught me all my life.

    1. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1568150/

      Based on having watched the documentary Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work and the depictions of Rivers' card index in the film and using her hands and a lateral file for scale, her cards seem to have been 3 x 5" index cards.

      cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/RvLTZjCQEe2uuaNwpTBNuA

    1. Oscillò la scaletta di corda che pendeva dal portello

      The chapter opens with Levi and his fellow prisoners working below ground in an underground cistern or tank and ends with the quotation from Dante about the sea closing over Ulysses’ and his companions’ heads. These two moments are further connected as the description of the tank – ‘scaletta di corda’ and ‘portello’, literally ‘hatch’ rather than ‘manhole’ – conjures up the image of a ship.

      EL

    2. Oscillò la scaletta di corda che pendeva dal portello

      The chapter opens with Levi and his fellow prisoners working below ground in an underground cistern or tank and ends with the quotation from Dante about the sea closing over Ulysses’ and his companions’ heads. These two moments are further connected as the description of the tank – ‘scaletta di corda’ and ‘portello’, literally ‘hatch’ rather than ‘manhole’ – conjures up the image of a ship.

      EL

    3. una cisterna interrata

      In the previous chapter, ‘Esame di chimica’, Primo has been admitted, through a kind of perverse and humiliating ‘chemistry examination’ carried out by Nazi official Herr Doktor Pannwitz, to a so-called ‘Chemical Kommando’. This Kommando will work, notionally, in a laboratory of the Buna-Werke industrial rubber plant, under construction by IG Farben next to the Monowitz-Auschwitz III concentration camp (and other POW and labour camps). The ‘cistern’ here is not a laboratory setting, but is probably a work site within the Buna complex.

      Monowitz was the largest of the extensive network of so-called satellite- or sub-camps beyond Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau. For more information on Monowitz, see the Subcamps of Auschwitz project.

      RG

    4. una cisterna interrata

      In the previous chapter, ‘Esame di chimica’, Primo has been admitted, through a kind of perverse and humiliating ‘chemistry examination’ carried out by Nazi official Herr Doktor Pannwitz, to a so-called ‘Chemical Kommando’. This Kommando will work, notionally, in a laboratory of the Buna-Werke industrial rubber plant, under construction by IG Farben next to the Monowitz-Auschwitz III concentration camp (and other POW and labour camps). The ‘cistern’ here is not a laboratory setting, but is probably a work site within the Buna complex.

      Monowitz was the largest of the extensive network of so-called satellite- or sub-camps beyond Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau. For more information on Monowitz, see the Subcamps of Auschwitz project.

      RG

    5. almeno un’ora

      Levi wrote this chapter in early 1946, apparently during a brief 45-minute lunch break at the Montecatini chemical plant at Avigliana, outside Turin, where he was then working (e.g. OC I, 1469). It is interesting to note that the chapter tells the story of another 'lunch break', in another chemical--industrial plant, an unimaginably darker, distant workplace.

      RG

    1. Actually, as Davidson argues, multitasking helps us see more and do more, and experience texts and tasks in different ways. There’s no evidence that anyone ever was deeply reading for hours on end with no interruptions. All we have are claims from Plato saying that writing is going to kill our ability to memorize. Our minds have always been wandering; we’ve always been distractible. We’ve always been doodling on the sides of pages, or thinking about our lunch, or stopping to converse with someone. Now we just have distraction that’s more readily available and purposefully attuned to distracting us — like popup ads, notifications; things that quite literally fly across your screen to distract you. But the fact that we have students who have grown up with those and have trained themselves to deal with those in such interesting ways is something that I think we should bring into the classroom and be talking about and critically thinking about

      1) the point that multitasking can offer different experiences with texts and tasks is interesting to me. initially, the comparison between multitasking and single-tasking seems like a clear distinction between what is beneficial (focus) and what is detrimental (distraction)

      2) taking a bold stance, i would venture to say that there exists a significant number of individuals who engage in deep work, which is perhaps one of the most profound pursuits throughout human history. after all, most of us have experienced a state of flow at least once, to some extent, and our brains subconsciously crave this state of heightened focus and productivity

      3) this observation all the more underscores the rarity of deep work in a world that is perpetually plagued by distractions

      here is one of my notes from deep work by cal newport:

      the connection between depth and meaning in human experience is undeniable. whether approached from the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, or philosophy, there appears to be a profound correlation between engaging in deep, meaningful activities and a sense of fulfillment. this suggests that our species may have evolved to thrive in the realm of deep work and purposeful engagement

  7. Apr 2023
    1. One way to weed those out is to begin with the most basic question we can formulate. Conceptual artist Jonathon Keats calls these “naive questions.” Geochemist Hope Jahren calls them “curiosity questions.” Whatever the label, they are, in essence, the kind of question a child could come up with.Progressing from such questions requires us to dig deeper and slow down our thinking — which, in turn, may reveal to us unknown unknowns or information we may have missed last time we explored the topic.

      For the intellectual worker, an Antinet can be used to keep track of such questions and the thought-lines corresponding to these questions.

    2. Many people, myself included, can find asking questions to be daunting. It fills us with worry and self-doubt, as though the act of being inquisitive is an all-too-public admission of our ignorance. Unfortunately, this can also lead us to find solace in answers — no matter how shaky our understanding of the facts may be — rather than risk looking stupid in front of others or even to ourselves.

      Asking questions is how we learn. Do not avoid it for the sake of not looking stupid. That is stupid. Inquiry-Based Learning.

      As Confucius said: "The one who asks a question is a fool for a minute, the one who doesn't ask is a fool for life."

  8. Mar 2023
    1. The ability to intentionally and strategically allocateour attention is a competitive advantage in a distracted world. Wehave to jealously guard it like a valuable treasure.

      It would seem that the word treasure here is being used to modify one's attention. Historically in books about "knowledge work" or commonplacing, the word was used with respect to one's storehouse of knowledge itself and not one's attention. Some of the effect is the result of the break in historical tradition being passed down from one generation to another. It's also an indication that the shift in value has moved not from what one knows or has, but that the attention itself is more valued now, even in a book about excerpting, thinking, and keeping knowledge!

      Oh how far we have fallen!

      It's also an indication of the extremes of information overload we're facing that the treasure is attention and not the small tidbits of knowledge and understanding we're able to glean from the massive volumes we face on a daily basis.

    1. wenn man Sethes Lebensprinzip kennt: "Ich arbeite nur, wenn ich mag. Aber ich mag immer arbeiten."

      Kurt Sethes' philosophy was encapsulated as "I only work when I like. But I always like to work." (Translation from German mine.)

    1. It appears his quote is widely misunderstood.  In his email to me, Dr. Comer states that he’s surprised by how “widely” his statement has been used and that it has grown out of neuroscience findings showing that meaningful relationships with material and experiences are remembered and applied more than others.

      Don't share under different contexts, otherwise show what the author meant. Also, don't share without understanding... Suggestion by Mortimer Adler as well.

    1. The lineage of domination from childhood in schools and at home to adulthood in the workplace is clear. Its purpose is to habituate us to hierarchy and psychological enslavement. Our aptitude for autonomy is atrophied and our vitality is suppressed so that we are reconciled with regimentation and can replicate and reproduce it throughout our interpersonal lives, politics, and cultures. That is Why Revolution Needs Therapy.

      It's incredible how our work ideology is shaped by a hierarchical way of thinking that you can see in many places of our society.

    1. "For this campaign, we surveyed 930 Americans to explore their retirement plans. Among them, 16% were retired, 22% were still working, and 62% were retirees who had returned to work."So, 149 of those surveyed were retired. Of those 149, 25 (1 in 6) are considering returning to work. 13 of those want remote positions.
    1. Simon Winchester describes the pigeonhole and slip system that professor James Murray used to create the Oxford English Dictionary. The editors essentially put out a call to readers to note down interesting every day words they found in their reading along with examples sentences and references. They then collected these words alphabetically into pigeonholes and from here were able to collectively compile their magisterial dictionary.

      Interesting method of finding example sentences in words.

  9. Feb 2023
    1. https://web.archive.org/web/20230226002724/https://medium.com/@ElizAyer/meetings-are-the-work-9e429dde6aa3 Meetings are regular work, so blindly avoiding meetings is damaging.

      Julian Elve follows up https://www.synesthesia.co.uk/2023/02/27/finding-the-real-work-that-meetings-are-good-at/ with lifting out the parts where Ayer discusses the type of meeting that are 'real work' and what they're for. (learning, vgl [[Netwerkleren Connectivism 20100421081941]]

    1. "Personal knowledge management is an aid to your work, not the work itself." —Sam Matla #

      This is entirely dependent on what and how you're doing it. If you're actively reading and annotating, and placing it somewhere, then that is the work, just in small progressive steps.

      He needs to be more specific about what he means by "personal knowledge management" as a definition of something.

    1. What we do know is that ChatGPT’s underlying tech is GPT-3 and OpenAI plans to drop an upgraded version, GPT-4 in 2023. Asking students to train the thing that might take away opportunities from them down the road seems particularly cannibalistic but I also don’t know how you fight something you don’t understand.

      Or, since many of our students in higher ed will be entering the knowledge work sector, it's a fair question to ask: what do you want that sector to be like? Do you want those jobs to be more like the minder of intelligent machines? Or do you want it to be a place where the human in the loop is still a craftsman with agency?

    1. “I only dowhat is easy. I only write when I immediately know how to do it. If Ifalter for a moment, I put the matter aside and do something else.”(Luhmann et al., 1987, 154f.)[4]

      https://youtu.be/qRSCKSPMuDc?t=37m30s (all links are on takesmartnotes.com)<br /> Luhmann, Niklas, Dirk Baecker, and Georg Stanitzek. 1987. Archimedes und wir: Interviews. Berlin: Merve.

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    1. I really liked Shopify's remote model of not closing offices, but turning them into "ports" for teams in major cities to get together throughout the year for planning, team building, and retreats. You had an official place to get together, enjoy the perks of tech company offices, but with the intention of deep short bursts of interaction rather than focused work.

      This seems a reasonable alternative alternative to remote-only, office-only and hybrid approaches.

    2. Five years from now, I think we will not see "remote only" for a large company and think "ooh, they value their employees I guess", but rather, "uh oh, they like to think of their employees as being like virtual servers, easy to spin up and easy to shut down the moment you don't need to pay for that capacity".

      A contrarian take on remote work

    1. 点击确定后,打开新的群聊会话页面,会话内提示您邀请了「xxx、xxx」加入会话(线上server逻辑)
    1. “My job involves supporting faculty wellness through pedagogy, but also supporting students’ wellness through the practice of pedagogy,”

      Fascinating order in that sentence. I don't think we pay enough attention to the way that course design/practice choices impact faculty wellness.

  10. Jan 2023
    1. These six are split across three operational meetings (each manager with their direct team, technical spec review, incident review), two developmental meetings (staff engineers, engineering managers) and finally a monthly engineering Q&A to learn what the organization is really thinking about.

      Six core organizational meetings

    2. My weekly team meetings always include my direct reports, and usually include our key partner in the Recruiting, People, and Finance teams. (I’ve also experimented with including engineers

      Ideas for who to include in a weekly team meeting

    1. "‚=μ ²@˜μ ›\@–@옪‡μ Œ‡y@–μ2“@μ “@2xx±μ ‡‚@ μ Nμ 2˜μ žV@μ ™@}f„2³™_‡‚μ‡Gμ™T@_μJ––b‡ƒμ 8‡ƒ˜l‚£@–μ*@{@2Ÿ-‡‚˜±μ (μ8‡}Eμ 629wμ ›‡μ€²–@zF

      In his work The Sickness unto Death, Soren Kierkegaard describes a similar polarity, describing how people wrestle with the conception of themselves as being both finite and infinite. Similar to Merleau-Ponty, Kierkegaard explains that the acknowledgement of these two "poles" results in a deeper understanding and sense of ones self.

    2. How, you wonder, can you be here, in place and at home in yourbody, and at the same time inhabit an atmospheric world that returnsthe body to you as a spectre? In that existential doubt lies the engine ofperception.

      This idea ties to the subjectivity and objectivity as mentioned in class. Rather the objectivity and subjectivity of sensing and perception can exist simultaneously. It reminds me of the Daoist work of Zhuangzi. This work is comprised of various parables on natural and humanist reflections. A very fundamental principle of Daoism is the mimicry of nature as it exhibits the Dao, or the Way. One such parable depicts Zhuangzi and Huizi, a prime minister, strolling along a dam. Zhuangzi makes a comment that the minnows are so joyful as they "dart around where they please." Huizi rebuts saying "You are not a fish -- how do you know what fish enjoy?" Zhuangzi eventually concludes that he know what the fish enjoy simply by standing by the river. The parable gets at the subjectivity of his observations intertwined with the objectivity of the fish's actions. They are existing together much like the observation of a stars light and the objective luminescence of a star. It gets slightly at perspective but creates a fascinating tension between the objective and subjective. If you want to read the parable is is here: https://terebess.hu/english/tao/Zhuangzi-Burton-Watson.pdf on page 276.

    3. The painting appeals to us preciselybecause it both chimes with our experience of what it feels like to be underthe stars and affords us the means to dwell upon it - perhaps to discoverdepths in this experience of which we would otherwise remain unaware .

      This experience is reminiscent of an approach in the Spiritual Exercises (a series of meditations constructed into a 4-week retreat, written by St. Ignatius of Loyola). Within the Exercises, the retreatant is instructed to make an "application of the senses," revisiting their meditations and paying closer attention to what they hear, feel, taste, smell, etc. Ignatius writes that in meditating this way, the experience and awareness of one's sensations allows them to "draw more profit" from the meditation, prompting a deeper, more revelatory prayer.

    4. The painting appeals to us preciselybecause it both chimes with our experience of what it feels like to be underthe stars and affords us the means to dwell upon it - perhaps to discoverdepths in this experience of which we would otherwise remain unaware

      This reminds me of writing, in this instance rhetoric and writing is rhetoric and art, as an affective composition in that the context, style, and signification of the art affects how we are both sensitive to and can sense how it feels to be under the stars and ponder the depths in the experience of being under the stars that one might otherwise be unaware of. This makes Gogh's art "matter" because of its style like metaphysical graffiti from Edbauer.

    1. There are also health and attitudinal consequences for managers who are laying people off as well as for the employees who remain. Not surprisingly, layoffs increase people’s stress.
    2. Layoffs increase the odds of suicide by two and a half times.
    3. The tech industry layoffs are basically an instance of social contagion, in which companies imitate what others are doing. If you look for reasons for why companies do layoffs, the reason is that everybody else is doing it.

      The main reason for tech layoffs

    1. I always allocate a year: six months to get up to speed on the internal culture, tools, and processes; another six months to get your first performance review as a “ramped-up” engineer.
    2. I posted my interview tracker spreadsheet on Twitter under the guise of “being transparent.” The very next day, I was on a phone screen with a recruiter when they said “Yeah, I looked at the interview spreadsheet you posted on Twitter and just based on that I can tell you’re not going to be a good fit here. I just took this call as a favor to <redacted> since they referred you.”
    3. Just because you’re getting a lot of offers to interview does not mean that you are a hot commodity. Nor does it indicate a high likelihood of obtaining an offer.
    4. If you had asked me right after I got laid off how long it would take me to get back to work, I would have said three months – including two months of vacation. It took me a year.

      2-3 months may turn into 1 year

    1. Wildcards tend to be labelled as "Swiss army knife", "generalist", or "jack of all trades". Each term fails to describe the full range of value that a Wildcard brings to the table.Wildcards fit best into the chaotic nature of early-stage startups.

      Wildcard people are good at many things but not a master

  11. Dec 2022
    1. Monastic and bimodal modes are rather reserved for professions that can manage work without intensive communication with people, like writers, scientists, researchers, etc. Journalist mode fits best to people that are experienced with deep work and can easily switch into that state. From my experience, the best option to start with deep work is the rhythmic mode.

      Advices around 4 different deep work modes

    2. As far as deep work is concerned, it can be performed in four different modes:

      4 different modes of deep work (see below)

    1. A final point regarding the myth of hard work and poverty is that this mythis particularly powerful because it implies a sense of justice and fairness. Thosewho do well in life through their hard work are seen as deserving, and thosewho do not do well in life through their lack of hard work are also seen as de-serving of their fate.14 There is something comforting about the idea that peopleget their just rewards. Unfortunately, neither the world nor poverty is fair. AsMichael Harrington wrote in his 1963 book, The Other America:The real explanation of why the poor are where they are is that they madethe mistake of being born to the wrong parents, in the wrong section of thecountry, in the wrong industry, or in the wrong racial or ethnic group. Oncethat mistake has been made, they could have been paragons of will and mo-rality, but most of them would never even have had a chance to get out ofthe other America.15
    1. The only negative to this method is that it may not ALWAYS work. If the data is faulty, or the link is inaccurately provided by the sender, Gmail won’t be able to recognise and include the unsubscribe button in Gmail.
    2. You may find this link isn’t available straight away, after a few emails one should appear, this is a common technique with mailing list providers.
  12. Nov 2022
    1. Go to any high-street bookshopand alongside those books promising to instruct readers on how toinfluence others, accumulate fortunes and achieve career success,one can also find a shelf of books telling readers to slow down, finda better ‘work–life balance’, and seek happiness by consuming less.

      existe una relacion

    1. La democracia de la sociedad del trabajo esel sistema de dominio más pérfido de la historia:un sistema de autoopresión

      me recuerda a lo que define Byung-Chul Han en La sociedad del cansancio porque la sociedad con exceso de positivad lo que consgue es que no haya un agente que explote a los trabajadores si no que cada uno nos explotemos a nosotros mismos

    2. apartheid social, al poder delegar las tareas domésticas y el cuidado de los niños aempleadas («obviamente» mujeres) mal pagadas

      delegar tareas es una cuestión de clase -> jerarquías

    3. «ayuda a la flexibilización»

      la conciliación familiar es una excusa para trabajar más.

    4. Estado paternalista empuña ellátigo solo por amor y siempre con la intención deeducar con rigor a sus hijos considerados «perezosos», en nombre de un futuro mejor para ellos
    5. los excluidos tendrán que aceptar cualquier trabajo sucio y esclavo, cualquiera de los «itinerarios de ocupación», por muy absurdos queparezcan, para demostrar su disposición incondicional a trabajar.

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    1. In 1964, after earning four O-levels, including one in art and maths, Eno had developed an interest in art and music and had no interest in a "conventional job".[12]

      When did the definition of a so-called "conventional job" emerge? Presumably after the start of the industrial revolution when people began moving from traditional crafts, home work, farm work, and other general subsistence work.

      What defines a non-conventional job? Does it subsume caring work? What does David Graeber have to say about this in Bullshit Jobs?

    1. The Console now supports redeclaration of const variables across separate REPL scripts (such as when you run a statement in the Console), in addition to the existing let and class redeclarations. This support allows you to experiment with different declarations for const variables without refreshing the page. Previously, DevTools threw a syntax error if you redeclared a const binding.

      Edge version of this matching release note from the matching Chrome feature:

      https://hyp.is/d9XEKGfOEe2a27vFWUjjSA/developer.chrome.com/blog/new-in-devtools-92/

      Interesting, they're copying some content, but not all of it verbatim.

    1. take a step back and ask a basic question: “What kind of business value are we trying to provide?"

      Recommended approach over saying "it depends" to your stakeholders

    1. This reminded me of Robert Greene’s definition of creativity, which is that creativity is a function of putting in lots of tedious work. “If you put a lot of hours into thinking and researching and reading,” Robert says, “hour after hour—a very tedious process—creativity will come to you.” 

      Robert Green's definition of creativity sounds like it's related to diffuse thinking processes. read: https://billyoppenheimer.com/august-14-2022/

      Often note taking, and reviewing over those notes is more explicit in form for creating new ideas.

      Come back to explore these.

    1. I know this is older but I'm surprised by the "Is redrawing 110K glyphs (with metrics and kerning and combining attributes and hinting) too hard?" I used to do typography. A plain, unoriginal typeface with 255 straightforward latin-# oriented letters is at least a couple days of work; probably a couple weeks; couple months for truly good work. 110K is the equivalent of 400+ faces with much harder metrics and such. 15,000 hours of work or drastically more; so at least 7 or so years. So, kinda hard.
  13. Oct 2022
    1. Onesuspected that Paxson's love for his work may have tempted him tolabor too long, and that he established a schedule to protect him-self and the keenness of his mind, to keep himself from his deskinstead of at it, as is some men's purpose.

      Pomeroy suspects that Paxson may have kept to a strict work schedule to keep his mind sharp, but he doesn't propose or suspect that it may have been the case that Paxson's note taking practice was the thing which not only helped to keep his mind sharp, but which allowed him the freedom and flexibility to keep very regular work hours.

    1. After decades of experience, he knew and understood that the most meaningful conceptual progress he made on problems was always away from his computer: on a run, in the shower, laying in bed at night. That’s where the insight came. And yet, even after all these years, he still felt a strange obligation to be at his computer because that’s too often our the mental image of “working”.
    2. Work at MIT found that brainstorming—where a bunch of people put their heads together to try to come up with innovative solutions—generally “reduced creativity due to the tendency to incrementally modify known successful designs rather than explore radically different and potentially superior ones.”

      The "bad" side of brainstorming

    1. Companies are excellent environments for social filtering. Because they sit on large volumes of data and information, going largely unused. Because organisations are a group of people with shared goals and tasks.

      This never happened in this way. Another example of how #socsoft became marketing almost exlusively. With the exeception perhaps of async tools like Slack (2013) or Yammer (2008, still exists as part of MS), although filtering is not their point, their users may use it that way. The whole #socsoft for org internal k-work never got much traction. Still a lost opportunity imo. Tools probably need to better fit existing culture/communication styles in org and be internal, but being created as separate place external with its own assumptions.

    1. Each user and each expert has incentives to work separately toward theconstruction of such a Garden. The users get to find answers, and expertscan rid themselves of commonly asked questions.

      This may help me with my own research needs to crowdsource peer review and create "living peer reviews."

    2. ngineerschose not to go to the channel of the highest quality for technical informa-tion, but rather to go to the channel of highest accessibility (i.e., lowestpsychological cost). Allen [1977] argued that the psychological cost was inthe potential lack of reciprocity between giving and obtaining informationand in the status implications of admitting ignorance.

      My last company had a page in their wiki with acronyms and downloadable Excel spreadsheets!

    1. bloodless and shrunken

      adjectives that are used to describe to women's fingers. they connote her labor. considering how the lady washed clothes to make her ends meet her bloodless fingers demonstrate her perseverance and work ethic. she willingly take on sacrifices to live another day. overall it can be symbolic to how hard the working class worked during the struggling times of the depression.

    1. Sometimes bullying comes with prejudice, but often it's a more instinctive behavior. There may be no belief, conscious or unconscious, behind it. It can be a plan or just an animal instinct to dominate, to coerce

      Bullying

    1. On “good” days, developers spend more time developing and less time collaborating
    1. Kyle McCann has always prided himself in his ability to make the best of any situation. So when his boss fired him from the job he started just eight weeks earlier, McCann held back tears and decided to focus on the bright side. 
    1. Thinking is a simultaneous struggle for conceptualorder and empirical comprehensiveness.
    2. I do not like to do empirical work if I can possibly avoidit. It m e a n s a great deal of trouble if one has no staff; if onedoes e m p l o y a staff, then the staff is often more troublethan the work itself. Moreover, they leave as soon as theyhave b e e n trained and made useful.

      Ha!

    3. certainly surrounding oneself with acircle of people who will listen and t a l k - - a n d at times theyhave to be imaginary characters--is one of them

      Intellectual work requires "surfaces" to work against, almost as an exact analogy to substrates in chemistry which help to catalyze reactions. The surfaces may include: - articles, books, or other writing against which one can think and write - colleagues, friends, family, other thinkers, or even imaginary characters (as suggested by C. Wright Mills) - one's past self as instantiated by their (imperfect) memory or by their notes about excerpted ideas or their own thoughts


      Are there any other surfaces we're missing?

    4. nd the way in which these cate-gories changed, some being dropped out and others beingadded, was an index of my own intellectual progress andbreadth. Eventually, the file came to be arranged accord-ing to several larger projects, having many subprojects,which changed from year to year.

      In his section on "Arrangement of File", C. Wright Mills describes some of the evolution of his "file". Knowing that the form and function of one's notes may change over time (Luhmann's certainly changed over time too, a fact which is underlined by his having created a separate ZK II) one should take some comfort and solace that theirs certainly will as well.

      The system designer might also consider the variety of shapes and forms to potentially create a better long term design of their (or others') system(s) for their ultimate needs and use cases. How can one avoid constant change, constant rearrangement, which takes work? How can one minimize the amount of work that goes into creating their system?

      The individual knowledge worker or researcher should have some idea about the various user interfaces and potential arrangements that are available to them before choosing a tool or system for maintaining their work. What are the affordances they might be looking for? What will minimize their overall work, particularly on a lifetime project?

    1. After almost 10 years of remote work, it would be close to impossible for me to go back to an office.

      `

  14. Sep 2022
    1. Unemployed workers are much more likelyto fall into poverty in countries like the United States, Canada, and Japan,compared with countries such as the Netherlands and Iceland.

      Is part of this effect compounded by America's history of the Protestant work ethic (see Max Weber)?

      Do the wealthy/powerful benefit by this structure of penalizing the unemployed this way? Is there a direct benefit to them? Or perhaps the penalty creates a general downward pressure on overall wages and thus provides an indirect benefit to those in power?

      What are the underlying reasons we tax the unemployed this way?

    1. Some people eventually realize that the code quality is important, but they lack of the time to do it. This is the typical situation when you work under pressure or time constrains. It is hard to explain to you boss that you need another week to prepare your code when it is “already working”. So you ship the code anyway because you can not afford to spent one week more.
    1. The rules recorded in natural language are readable not only by humans but also by the computer and therefore no longer need to be programmed by a software developer. This task is now taken over by openVALIDATION.
    1. Learned right, which means understanding, which meansconnecting in a meaningful way to previous knowledge, informationalmost cannot be forgotten anymore and will be reliably retrieved iftriggered by the right cues.

      Of course this idea of "learned right" sounds a lot like the problems built into "just". He defines it as meaning "understanding" but there's more he's packing into the word. While his vein example is lovely, the bigger issue is contextualizing everything all the time, which is something that commonly isn't done or even done well over time by educators. This work takes time and effort to help students do this as they're not doing it for themselves until much later in life.

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    1. this medium that we're inventing the dynamic medium 00:25:10 has three very interesting properties

      !- antidote : inhumane knowledge work - dynamic medium