79 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. DEVELOPMENT ARTICLEA systems-based approach to technology integrationusing mentoring and communities of practice

      This article presents a model of technology integration at the system level formed around mentoring. It focuses on effective methods of teacher professional development in the area of technology integration and discusses overcoming various obstacle teachers face during adult learning/ education. 6/10, very narrow focus of adult learners.

    1. METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT IN ADULT LEARNING RESEARCHCOMBINING PHYSIOLOGICAL REACTIONS AND LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN SIMULATION-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

      This article details the methods and results of a research experiment done to determine whether/ how physiological measurement technologies can be used with educational research methods to investigate subjective learning experiences. Describes research methods and data collected. 8/10, very interesting article and a very interesting and well done study but very specific to this one topic. e

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

  2. Sep 2020
    1. in constructing representations of how to supportlearning in particular cases

      It reminds me of conjecture mapping. Are we going to make the similar thing?

  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jun 2020
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  5. Apr 2020
  6. Mar 2020
    1. Resources for Closing the Digital Divide

      This website hosts numerous resources to aid educators in their attempt to close the digital divide that alienates a certain socio-economic demographic of students and limits their ability to succeed in school. The website first lists hyperlinked articles to help educators understand the state of the digital divide, then lists hyperlinked articles and resources to help take action to improve the digital divide and close digital learning gaps before supplying links to articles and resources that can help instructors develop media and digital literacy within their respective classrooms. This would be an incredibly helpful website for any instructor who is looking for background information on and resources by which to close the digital divide. Rating: 9/10

    1. Emerging Theories of Learning and the Role of Technology

      This article discusses the social changes introduced by new technologies and how educational environments are trying to prepare students to enter a technologically advanced workforce through integration of technology with curriculum. The author challenges traditional theories of learning by discussing how cognition is situated in the digital, 21st-century learner, and that technology integration should focus on the importance of community within learning environments. Although the article challenges the traditional ideas of technology integration, it fails to provide actionable ways in which educators could infuse technology into their own curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Technology Integration: Connections to Educational Theories

      This article, written by five instructors at the Ohio State University at Mansfield (OSU-M), explores the ways in which OSU-M has integrated technology into their curriculum as well as the pedagogical reasons behind the integration. The article begins with a background introduction into the campus of OSU-M and its student population before explaining the required technology courses students in their teacher education program experience based on ISTE standards. Next, the article outlines six criteria the university used to develop its technology curriculum and discusses their use of developmentally appropriate practice, integrated curriculum, literature-based instruction, classroom-based inquiry, and diversity and equity. This article could serve as a practical, although dated, model by which adult educators could begin to construct a method of integrating technology into their curriculum. Ranking: 4/10

    1. At the Intersection of Technology and Pedagogy: considering styles of learning and teaching

      In this article, Gibson analyzes the use of educational technology through the lens of learning styles of students as well as through learning environments, including those that are teacher-centric and those that are student-centric. The article also discusses the differences between technologies that simply make the work already being done in classes easier to do and those technologies that fundamentally challenge pedagogy to evolve towards a more constructivist ideology.The author further explores external social and political pressures to increase technology integration in the classroom, but warns that not all integration is constructive integration. Although the article discusses many approaches to technology integration, it fails to include concrete steps that educators might take to include technology into their curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Research in Educational Technology

      This textbook, published by the Oklahoma State University Library ePress, contains a chapter which summarizes the main views of knowledge in educational technology research, including postpositivism, constructivism, advocacy, and pragmatism, as well as each view's research traditions. The chapter suggests an approach to evaluating research articles through the lenses of a consistent learning theory coupled, methodologies that support that learning theory, and the conclusions that are drawn by the researchers supported through their methodologies. This chapter would help educators evaluate how and why they might include technology into their course curriculum. Rating: 7/10

    1. Technology Integration in Schools

      This article focuses on the lack of technology integration by K-12 educators into the curriculum itself based on the evaluation of the amount of access to educational technologies by both teachers and students, how often these technologies are used for instructional purposes, and how that technology is used to facilitate learning by students. The article goes on to discuss ways in which access to educational technology has been increased through one-to-one computing initiatives which has produced mixed results and open educational resources which suggests that educators produce learning materials without compensation. Next, the article suggests ways to increase instructional technology use through professional development in which teacher skills are developed using technology, collaborative environments used to increase holistic teacher engagement, and mentoring to improve teachers' attitudes towards technology implementation. Finally, the article discusses ethical issues surrounding technology use including academic dishonesty, accessibility, and ethical use behaviors.The author concludes with a set of needs in order to bring about effective use of educational technology which include pedagogically sound practices, personalized instruction, assessment, and change at the systemic level. This article provides a very well-rounded view of the challenges and affordances that educators face when considering how to integrate technology into their curriculum. Rating: 8/10

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article first discusses characteristics of adult learners before addressing the ways in which online learning design should be influenced by the adult learning theories of andragogy, self-directed learning, experiential learning, and transformative learning. By comparing the characteristics of adult learners and the ways in which the theories do or do not address those theories, the author suggests ways in which the characteristics of an adult learner should be used to develop a more holistic approach to developing online learning environments. Although the author doesn't include practical application, it is one of the few articles that expresses a need to combine multiple theories into one design approach. Ranking: 6/10

    1. Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education

      Although only a preview of this textbook is available for free, the amount of historical research included is incredible. The chapters cover a diverse range of topics that are still being discussed today and demonstrate the ideological underpinnings of many modern issues. Published in 2000, the conversation about technology integration in adult learning has moved far beyond the scope of this book, but it could certainly serve as an underpinning of many of the issues that are still being discussed and developed upon today. Ranking: 5/10

    1. Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Eight Keys to Success

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article focuses on the author's perspective of the primary concern in technology integration in educational environments - the instructor. The authors discuss the eight barriers that teachers create when trying to integrate technology: fear of change, training, personal use, teaching models, learning theories, educational climate, motivation, and support. Although the advice is practical, it is extremely rudimentary, created eighteen years ago, and does not address the more modern concerns of integration of technology in adult educational environments. Ranking: 3/10

    1. A Paradigm Shift: Technology Integration for Higher Education in the New Millennium

      To view this article, click "full text." The article discusses a paradigm shift for educational technology at a time when distance learning first started growing across the United States. Initially, institutions of higher learning were driven by technology integration standard mandates as well as competition from other institutions, but eventually the shift normalized with federal funding. The author discusses barriers to technology adaptation, focused on teacher training, before describing characteristics of the distance learner and distance teacher. Although the article may have been relevant for its time, twenty years later it serves more as a grounding article for when educational technology first began to take rise, the considerations and limitations that were addressed, and the way that technology integration in classrooms has still not realized the potential envisioned by its early adopters. Rating: 4/10

    1. Integrating Technology in the Adult Education Classroom

      This website offers an online course regarding the purposes, guidelines, and implementation of integrating technology into adult learning environments. Additionally, the course offers examples of ways to integrate that technology. Rank: 7/10

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage hosts numerous links to help educators understand the current challenges and successes of technology integration into the educational environment. Additionally, there are resources broken down by grade level and a list of additional resources on the internet for a wide range of general and specialized learning environments.

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage offers a wealth of links to understanding current elements of technology integration into various classrooms, links to the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology, as well as a link to resources for technology integration which provides useful tools that teachers can begin to deploy immediately. Ranking: 9/10

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.  

      This section of the ISTE website offers paid resources that educators can access to improve their own understanding of the ISTE standards as well as practical ways to implement those standards in their classroom integration of technology. Rating: 6/10

  7. Feb 2020
    1. Top 5 Educational App Ideas to Look in 2020

      Students are now more equipped with mobile phones. Hence, to make them engaged in learning it is the best idea to develop mobile apps for school. Get in touch with us, to bring your educational app idea to reality.

  8. Nov 2019
    1. We did a study, many many years ago in education, about the importance and the role of technology in the classroom, how can it help with the education process. The result of this education research we did was that the students who succeed are the ones who are most engaged, which is really simple. 

      This ‘graph might be the key to something rather deep about Apple in education. And about Old School EdTech.

      People are focusing on Schiller’s comment about Chromebooks, yet this reference to an old study is perhaps more revealing.

    1. In the text "10 Current and Emerging Trends in Adult Education," ten current trends are briefly reviewed. Among these are the emphasis on effort, growth, and social-emotional learning. In terms of technology, real-life simulations and AI are being used to better prepare learners for their professional encounters and responsibilities. In terms of what is on the horizon for adult learning, one can expect mastery to be emphasized rather than degrees. As a result of the information economy, it is expected that income inequality will grow and thus advocacy for adult learners and continued opportunities for working adults to grow will mitigate the negative consequences. Rating: 7/10

    1. This proposal of sorts, is recent, from 2017, from the US department of education and educational technology offices. We get a current look at a 21 century student, which no longer only includes high school graduates and more like working family members, military personnel, have children, and are first generation attendees. The use of technology has the ability to engage and empower students in support of student success by learning from our peers, working education, flexible schedule, is online, and student centered. 10/10

    1. The text "Adult Learners Come to Campus With Unique Technology Needs" illustrates the barriers to learning that surround a learner's experience with technology. Author David Hutchins suggests having inclusive discussions with diverse sets of technology users to best determine their needs, issues, and reasonable solutions for support. Multi-level support for multiple generations of learners includes the instructors, administration, and IT teams that work together to improve education via technology. Embedding links throughout the text re-direct the reader to valuable resources for further review. Rating: 7/10

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

    1. An understanding of adult learning theories (ie, andragogy) in healthcare professional education programs is important for several reasons.

      The author of this article articulates the instrumental learning theories in the healthcare industry. The information provided is more like a speedy way for students and healthcare providers to understand the learning theories. Rating: 4/5

  9. Oct 2019
    1. make the teaching and learning problems caused by copyright the core issue we are solving with OER

      I still wonder to what degree open educational practices are necessarily or always tied to copyright. That is, can OEP be implemented on copyrighted texts?

  10. eastcentraluniversity-my.sharepoint.com eastcentraluniversity-my.sharepoint.com
    1. market built on socioeconomic inequity,

      Some markets only work because of this inequity. These are not necessarily markets we should encourage, even if they claim to be "free".

  11. Sep 2019
    1. Supporting Personalised Learning Frequently mentioned throughout the interviews was the goal of allowing learners to explore their personal interests, culture and social context through assessment. Several participants sought to design assessment that allowed learners to tap into these aspects of their personal lives. Where learners could exercise choice and pursue projects of personal interest, a greater sense of ownership was observed. James commented that “they love the idea that they are in control of what they do”, when given more choice around assessment. Other participants suggested it was possible to have learners working on projects that could benefit their personal lives or professional trajectories as part of formal coursework. In her final assignment, Olivia provides the learners “absolute free reign in terms of what kind of a thing they produced.” Learners use their creative interests to develop resources for the course, as Olivia reflects “some opted for essays still, but other students created digital timelines, infographics, podcasts, comic books, videos.” Personalisation of assessment was suggested to allow learners to represent and situate themselves authentically and creatively through their work.

      Giving learners more autonomy in their learning is a great pedagogical principle, and in the context of the article focusing on learning design, I can see how this fits with "open" as it does require that the course design needs to be more "open" as in flexible to allow for this kind of learner autonomy. There is overlap here between authentic learning and open pedagogy.

  12. Mar 2019
    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. This page is a simply presented list of many learning theories, both popular and less well known. The layout is clean. The pages to which the listed items link are somewhat minimal in nature so this would give a basic tour or overview of the models and would allow viewers to review the names of some of the learning theories. This page does not prioritize learning theories or identify and establish those theories that are the most prominent.

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. teachthought This particular page is entitled '20 simple assessment strategies you can use every day' but the reason it is listed here is because the page itself serves as a jumping off point for reviewing or learning about many educational theories and principles. This site may have been designed for K-12 teachers - I am not sure, but it is quite usable for those who teach adults. This is a place to come if you are interested in browsing - not if you have a specific thing you need at the moment. Rating 3/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

  13. Nov 2018
    1. Older adult learning environment preferences

      Older adult preferences.is a dissertation preview that introduces the dissertation on preference of older adults to attend in person classes weekly for four to six hours.

      The information gleaned from this study is significant for learning designers and course structure. The study also investigated the time and location of the study, and the class make up. This information also warrants further investigation when designing courses for these adults and the success of the program. The dissertation is of value to those who are specifically involved in designing programs for older adults.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. Educational Technology Leadership and Practice in Higher Education: The Emergence of Threshold Concepts

      This article explores how technology has become the new standard for higher education and this new standard has created a need to develop new concepts on how to view a subject. Additionally, methods to use educational technology resources are described. Rating: 5/5

    1. What is the future of technology in education?

      The article explores how technology will grow beyond individual devices and how it will move into the cloud. Cloud computing would allow students and teachers to access course content any time and any place. Rating: 5/5

    1. Here's how technology is shaping the future of education

      This article explains how technology is changing education and offers a few examples of how it has already done so. Rating: 5/5

  14. Oct 2018
    1. A wariness that has been slowly brewing is turning into a regionwide consensus: The benefits of screens as a learning tool are overblown, and the risks for addiction and stunting development seem high.
  15. Mar 2018
    1. Complexity Theory - Dynamical Systems Theory

      If we want to make change we should come at a problem from as many different areas as possible.

      We should be wary of the magic bullet. Complexity theory may be seen as post-structuralist or even further?

      This is part of an agency structure debate.

      There are varied factors that contribute to change.

      The connections of neurons are more important than the number of cells are more important for consciousness or the mind. This is a good analogy for why complexity theory is so essential.

      Consciousness emerges when critical mass is reached in a system.

      It's hard to know how much of a factor something can be in a causal system. For example, how much do we cause do we attribute to butterfly wings causing a storm in India.

      What causes change in the education system?

      We need to use words like compounding effects to explain change.

      We need to conceive of change in terms of speed and direction, like a mathematical function.

      We need to be wary of one dimensional change or one kind of initiative. You need to think of multiple factors.

      Effective intervention means intervention from every possible angle.

      We need to pump resources until we have autocatalysis.

      International Journal of Education Development Mark Mason

  16. Jan 2018
    1. Hi everyone. Do you have names for new apps that teachers can use them to communicate with their students in distance?

  17. Nov 2017
    1. This is certainly how the debate about licensing has played out.

      In fact, Rory McGreal adamantly argues that CC-BY-NC material is too restrictive to be called “OER”. We had a short exchange about this. In Quebec’s Cégep system, NC was the rule for reasons which are probably easy to understand. So the focus is on licenses, in this scene, not on practices. Hence the whole thing about Open Textbooks. Often made me wonder if any of these people had compared textbook-based teaching to any of the other modalities. In my teaching, textbooks are a problem, even when they’re open. Sure, some of those problems can be solved when you have access to the code and can produce your own textbook from that. That’s the typical solution offered in the GitHub sphere:

      Just Fork It!

      But the core problem remains: if you’re teaching with a textbook, you may not really be building knowledge with learners.

      (Should probably move this here.)

  18. Apr 2017
    1. 4 Technological and Media Change

      There is still very little thinking about digital education from a policy/discourse/politics-of-education perspective. Interesting work by Ben Williamson, Greg Thompson, Ian Cook.

  19. Mar 2017
  20. Feb 2017
  21. Nov 2016
    1. "Wikity is social bookmarks, wikified." -- Mike Caulfield<br> http://rainystreets.wikity.cc/<br> https://github.com/michaelarthurcaulfield/wikity-zero/

      as far as I can tell, Wikity is the simplest way to run a personal wiki on top of WordPress. But the focus is a hyperlinked bookmarking and notetaking system, because after a year of use and 2,000 cards logged, I can tell you that is where the unique value is.

    1. It has been seen nowadays in almost all the cities and countries that internet has taken the primary positions of almost all the things for human beings. The Internet is one of the most important priorities of an individual whether he/she is a kid, a younger or an elderly. Hence, the children of today also enjoy the internet and have made the internet as the most important thing for them. Kids like to study on the internet and even parents also want their children to study through the internet as the internet has the best options available for studies.http://blog.selectmytutor.co.uk/11-educational-websites-for-primary-school-children/

  22. Sep 2016
    1. frame the purposes and value of education in purely economic terms

      Sign of the times? One part is about economics as the discipline of decision-making. Economists often claim that their work is about any risk/benefit analysis and isn’t purely about money. But the whole thing is still about “resources” or “exchange value”, in one way or another. So, it could be undue influence from this way of thinking. A second part is that, as this piece made clear at the onset, “education is big business”. In some ways, “education” is mostly a term for a sector or market. Schooling, Higher Education, Teaching, and Learning are all related. Corporate training may not belong to the same sector even though many of the aforementioned EdTech players bet big on this. So there’s a logic to focus on the money involved in “education”. Has little to do with learning experiences, but it’s an entrenched system.

      Finally, there’s something about efficiency, regardless of effectiveness. It’s somewhat related to economics, but it’s often at a much shallower level. The kind of “your tax dollars at work” thinking which is so common in the United States. “It’s the economy, silly!”

  23. Aug 2016
  24. Jul 2016
  25. Jun 2016
  26. Apr 2016
    1. Blogs tend towards conversational and quotative reuse, which is great for some subject areas, but not so great for others. Wiki feeds forward into a consensus process that provides a high level of remix and reuse, but at the expense of personal control and the preservation of divergent goals. Wikity takes lessons from federated wiki, combining the individual control of blogging with the permissionless improvement of wiki.

      Mike Caulfield introduces http://wikity.cc, a personal wiki platform in which editing is blog-like (it runs on WordPress), but pages can be easily copied and remixed.

      I am particularly excited about ways it might be used to help faculty and students to collaborate on OER across institutions.

    1. Those students that bought the cheap version of the text back in 1991? They were pill-splitters. And they failed at pill-splitting (and maybe at the course). Do we own that failure? What we’ve learned over the past five years or so in OER is that what we sell in the Open Textbook movement is not just reduced cost. It’s the simplicity that you can get when you’re not working with an industry trying to milk every last dollar out of students. It’s every student having their materials on day one, for as long as they like, without having to navigate “simple” questions of what to buy, what to rent, and when-is-the-book-on-the-syllabus-that’s-required-not-really-required.
  27. Jan 2016
    1. Creating simulations, however, requires expert-level skills in interaction design, graphics, database functionality, and programming - not to mention instructional design, content expertise, and imagination.

      It all depends on your expectations. Lone teachers (and lone students!) can create very useful simulations. They learn a whole lot in the process. Not sure why this “everything needs to be of professional quality and therefore requires an expensive/expansive team of professionals” mentality comes from. Makes it sound like they have something to sell, to be honest.

  28. Dec 2015
    1. legal changes often lead to negative outcomes. New laws can limit use, introduce new payments or make open licensing incompatible with the given legal system. In such cases, OER advocates need to take a stance in defense of the existing rules.
    2. not all of the resources needed for education will be openly licensed — for example, modern education requires use of cultural resources that are in copyright and will never be openly licensed. We therefore need good and balanced rules allowing educators acting in the public interest to use these resources.
    3. the development of OER provides proof for the need of strong user rights in education. By looking at effects of successful OER projects we can describe a future educational reality, in which institutions, educators, and students benefit from a more liberal copyright law. Part of the success of Wikipedia as an education tool is the fact that no one accessing the site, or copying it for students, needs to worry: “Is this legal?”
  29. Nov 2015
    1. Some practitioners of open education have been dismayed at the recent emphasis on "free textbooks", which implies that cost-cutting is the main goal of openness. But it should not be forgotten that for many teachers and students, open textbooks provide an introduction to broader open practices.

    1. Canada is unique in the world in that it is the only country whose national government has no authority in education;

      Though it may be taken for granted by actors in the sphere of learning in Canada, this factoid can have a large impact in terms of “Canadian Exceptionalism”.

    1. Northern Virginia Community College’s Extended Learning Institute (ELI) and open courseware provider Lumen Learning announced a collaboration to publish 24 online college courses for two complete degree programs. All courses were developed for zero student cost using open educational resources (OER)
  30. Mar 2014
    1. 2-year research project Games@School concerning educational gaming aspects.

      researches prove that educational gaming is an effective learining method