33 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. appointed a consultant to the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment at Aldermaston, he witnessed the development of a British nuclear weapon.
    2. In 1943 he joined the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, United States of America. Here he helped to design the explosive lens system that shaped the initial shock wave to the spherical (‘fat man’) bomb, and the sequential timing system necessary for its detonation. He triggered the first bomb test (‘Trinity’) on 16 July 1945. Subsequently, a cylindrical (‘little boy’) bomb was exploded over Hiroshima and a ‘fat man’ over Nagasaki.

      Nagasaki & Hiroshima

    3. in 1947 Titterton returned to Britain. At the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, he was in charge of a nuclear physics research group that conducted pioneering studies of ternary fission—the decay of highly excited light nuclei and multi-particle disintegrations produced by fast neutrons
    4. They also discovered spontaneous fission but were prevented from publishing.

      Discovery

    5. He next collaborated with Otto Frisch at Birmingham and Liverpool to develop a British nuclear weapon

      First nucular Weapon

    6. Titterton and his group co-operated with industry to produce a reliable model for use in aircraft.

      War

    7. Titterton undertook part-time teaching at the Birmingham Central Technical College, but this career was cut short by the outbreak of World War II.

      Job end

    8. professor of nuclear physics

      His profession

    1. This plain page incorporates an overview of job aids by Allison Rossett, who is the foremost authority on the topic. Not all information is given away for free as she wants to sell her books, which are also promoted on the page. This page can be a good way of tracking her current work. Rating 3/5

    1. Mager's tips on instructional objectives This is a very simple page that consists of black and white text without any graphics. As is, the text on the page is rather small and difficult (for me, anyway) to read, so one may wish to enlarge it. The process of creating instructional objectives in this format is explained in a clear and straightforward way. Rating 5/5

  2. Jan 2019
    1. Of course men haven't been discriminated against as much a women in the work place. Men are "meant" to do jobs in STEM, while women aren't really seen in the STEM program as much. Women deserve to be recognized in anything as much as men are they're just as good.

  3. Nov 2017
  4. Jul 2017
    1. Digital art will rival the real thing. “Will a 3D-printed sculpture have the same value as a sculpture made by someone 50 years ago with their hands? People sometimes see digital art as a lesser form of art. Oh, that is done by computer, not hand! Then people think it should be cheaper. I worry that consumers will see 3D art as something cheap — not the real thing. But once you can print a masterpiece from an artist and have it as your own, people will think differently. I am pretty sure that if Michelangelo had a computer, he would have used it.”
    2. 3D printing will continue to grow in importance. “As creatives, it’s our duty to incorporate 3D printing into our work. When you have the possibility to make your work tangible, that gives it more richness. I hope 3D printing allows people to fully customize their lives. One day if we need shoes or more silverware, we can just print them in our home. I think this will be true for all of our household basics. We’re going to have more creatives in the world because things that have traditionally been done on an industrial scale will be able to be done by anyone with 3D printing.”
    3. You’ll have to broaden your skill set. “You can have a great design, but if you can’t communicate the story behind it, it will be the downfall of the greatest designers. It’s important to learn the ‘soft skills’ which are learning how to speak publicly to grab attention, keep attention, and clearly articulate your ideas. You should learn to negotiate your prices, as well as know how to read a room and when you should disappear. The other side is the psychology of the business upfront, the questions of: Why am I building this? Why is it important? Or what impact am I going to have on the world? It’s important to answer before you design. Having the business and designer mindset is important.”
    4. Specialization + communication = a career win.  “Instead of trying to become a jack-of-all-trades, young designers should be trained in one specific design discipline, communication design, product design, interior design, fashion design, or digital media design. The design student should develop an understanding of how the respective design discipline interfaces with technology and business. Students should work in projects together with students from other design disciplines and preferably also with students from engineering and business. This is training for young designers and a time to nurture communication skills.”
    5. Visual VR is just the start.  “There really is a lot of opportunities and means for expression inside VR. For example, Axon VR is developing full body virtual reality, both the software and hardware. The apparatus is somewhat imposing, and the leap to a first-person experience is astounding when you add visual, sound, and the sense of touch. The visual power of the experiences has sky-rocketed as a result. When you put that in the hands of creative people, there’s a real opportunity for the experiences that come out of it to be completely, utterly fantastic.”
    6. Storytelling will have no clear narrative arc. “The amount of investment/heat around virtual and augmented reality will be the next big challenge for creative professionals, and understanding the self-navigating narrative like that is not a part of most creative disciplines. Traditionally, we’ve always told linear stories. I think the biggest nut to crack will be how creatives design story games that the users can tell themselves.”
    7. Experience design will become increasingly important. “Retail shopping is not solely about the transactional experience any more. It’s about going into a store, feeling the vibe of that brand and getting that bigger lifestyle out of it. Right now that’s very much an urban, high-end experience, so how do we do that in a more populous way? We are looking a lot at the mall K11 in Hong Kong, and how they have incorporated so many different things in their experience, from having art everywhere to farms that are growing mushrooms that you can pick and have incorporated into your meal to programs for kids. And it’s all very-well curated, so there are always new exhibitions and programs.”
    8. Crooked career paths will be the norm. “More and more I am seeing people who haven’t followed the traditional career path. When hiring, I look for the narrative that stitches the person’s career together: Why did they make the decisions that they did? What was the trajectory that they found themselves on? I don’t really care that much anymore if you went to a pedigree design school or started at a prestigious company. What I care about is that you learned and grew and there was an intent behind what you were building towards.”
    9. The line between design and business will continue to blur. “The more a designer understands how the business works, the more valuable they will be to employers. Designers who understand a company’s value proposition and mission can help them thrive and grow. They just need to learn the language that someone who is running a company actually speaks. When they can articulate exactly what they bring to the table, executives will realize that they didn’t just hire a designer — they also hired a strategist!”
    1. According to a recent study by online job matching service TheLadders, the fastest growing jobs are in user experience design, iOS and Android development, and business intelligence–some of which didn’t exist before 2007.The study, which gathered key word search data from among its 6 million members, also found that middle management jobs are being phased out. Among the top 10% of growing jobs, less than 2% of titles contain the word “manager” or “director,” which points to a trend that you can still be a professional in a high-paying position, but the end game isn’t a gold plaque with a management title tacked to your name.Mark Newman, CEO of digital interviewing service HireVue, says the company is witnessing similar trends as it helps place people with companies such as Hilton, GE, Chipotle, and others. “Overall, HireVue is seeing that jobs of the future are design and data scientist jobs,” he says.
  5. Jan 2017
    1. The neighborhood has added nearly 1,000 new jobs in the past three years, thanks to the new Method soap factory, a new Wal-Mart Supercenter and retail strip and an incoming Whole Foods Market distribution center expected to open by the end of 2017, said David Doig, president of Chicago Neighborhood Initiatives, the nonprofit developer behind the projects. Another retail center under development, which will include Chipotle and Potbelly restaurants, should add another 30 to 40 jobs, he said.Sixty percent of the jobs have gone to people living within nearby ZIP codes, including many to young people, Doig said. He expects updated youth employment numbers to look much better than the 20 percent drop recorded in the Great Cities report.

      This is a start to a solution, but what does it take to have this happen and is it needed in all areas where there are unemployment challenges?

    1. interesting that this program hasn't been funded since 2012, but was aimed specifically at supporting employment for individuals in low-income communities.

  6. Dec 2015
  7. Jul 2015
  8. Feb 2014
    1. The other way to help these students would be to dramatically reduce the price or time required to get an education of acceptable quality (and for acceptable read “enabling the student to get a better job”, their commonest goal.) This is a worse option in every respect except one, which is that it may be possible.
    2. After the massive expansion of higher education into job training, the promising 18-year-old who goes straight to a residential college is now the odd one out.

      The role of higher-ed has changed to encroach into the territory of community colleges with job training as a goal.