95 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. https://fs.blog/2021/08/remember-books/

      A solid overview of how to read. Not as long or as in-depth as Mortimer J. Adler, but hits all of the high points in an absorbable manner.

      Definitely worth re-reading...

    2. The goal is not to read as many books as possible. The goal is to gain as much wisdom as you can.
    3. Using models while reading can also help you get more out of the book. Here are some examples of paths they might lead you down: Confirmation bias: Which parts of this book am I ignoring? Does this book confirm my opinions? (Okay, but does it actually affirm your beliefs or are you just seeing what you want to see? If you cannot think of a single point in the book that you disagreed with, confirmation bias is likely distorting your reasoning.) Bayesian updating: What opinions should I change in light of this book? How can I update my worldview using the information in it? Keep in mind the words of John Maynard Keynes: “When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, sir?” Incentives: What motivates the characters or the author? What are they seeking? What is their purpose? Here’s how Kurt Vonnegut described the importance of incentives in books: “When I used to teach creative writing, I would tell the students to make their characters want something right away—even if it’s only a glass of water. Characters paralyzed by the meaninglessness of modern life still have to drink water from time to time.” Availability bias: Are the books I have recently read affecting how I perceive this one? How are my immediate past experiences shaping my reading? Am I assigning undue importance to parts of this book because they are salient and memorable? Social proof: How is social proof—the number of copies sold, bestseller status, the opinions of others—affecting my perception of this book? Is the author using social proof to manipulate readers? It is not unusual for authors to buy their way onto bestseller lists, providing social proof that then leads to substantial sales. As a result, mediocre books can end up becoming popular. It’s a classic case of the emperor having no clothes, which smart readers know to look out for. Survivorship bias: Is this (nonfiction) book a representation of reality or is the author failing to account for base rates? Survivorship bias is abundant in business, self-help, and biographical books. A particular case of a successful individual or business might be held as the rule, rather than the exception. Utility: If a book offers advice, does it have practical applications? At what point do diminishing returns set in?

      This is a good list of questions to put into a template to ask both while and after reading a book.

      What other regularly recurring questions might go into such a list?

  2. Aug 2021
    1. The first step in translating experience, either of other men's writing, or of your own life, into the intellectual sphere, is to give it form. Merely to name an item of experience often invites you to explain it; the mere taking of a note from a book is often a prod to reflection. At the same time, of course, the taking of a note is a great aid in comprehending what you are reading.

      on the purpose of taking notes, annotating one's reading, or commonplacing

      highlight is a quote from

      C. Wright Mills' profound "Appendix: On Intellectual Craftsmanship," as found in his book on The Sociological Imagination.[16]

    2. Reading should never be merely passive and consist in the mere absorption or copying of information. It should be critical and engage the material reflectively, being guided by questions such as "Why is this important?" "How does this fit in?" "Is it true?" "Why is the author saying what she is saying?" etc.
    1. William Poole, “The Genres of Milton’sCommonplace Book,” inThe Oxford Handbook of Milton, ed. NicholasMcDowell and Nigel Smith (2009), pp.367–81, argues that since Milton’scommonplace book was an exercise in moral philosophy (the discipline towhich his headings of ethics, economics, and politics correspond), it wascompiled for action.

      John Milton's commonplace book was an exercise in moral philosophy and it was compiled for action, not just a collection.

  3. Jul 2021
    1. Reading and listening are thought of as receiving communication from someone who is actively engaged in giving or sending it. The mistake here is to suppose that re­ceiving communication is like receiving a blow or a legacy or a judgment from the court. On the contrary, the reader or listener is much more like the catcher in a game of baseball. Catching the ball is just as much an activity as pitching or hitting it. The pitcher or batter is the sender in the sense that his activity initiates the motion of the ball. The catcher or fielder is the receiver in the sense that his activity terminates it. Both are active, though the activities are different.

      Reading is a receptive active undertaking in the same way as a catcher receiving a pitch in baseball.

    2. One reader is better than another in proportion as he is capable of a greater range of activity in reading and exerts more effort. He is better if he demands more of himself and of the text before him.
    3. the more active the reading the better.

      How much more active can it be than also actively annotating and note taking?

    4. One of the reasons for this situation is that the very media we have mentioned are so designed as to make thinking seem unnecessary (though this is only an appearance). The packag­ing of intellectual positions and views is one of the most active enterprises of some of the best minds of our day. The viewer of television, the listener to radio, the reader of magazines, is presented with a whole complex of elements-all the way from ingenious rhetoric to carefully selected data and statistics-to make it easy for him to "make up his own mind" with the mini­mum of difficulty and effort. But the packaging is often done so effectively that the viewer, listener, or reader does not make up his own mind at all. Instead, he inserts a packaged opinion into his mind, somewhat like inserting a cassette into a cassette player. He then pushes a button and "plays back" the opinion whenever it seems appropriate to do so. He has performed ac­ceptably without having had to think.

      This is an incredibly important fact. It's gone even further with additional advances in advertising and social media not to mention the slow drip mental programming provided by algorithmic feeds which tend to polarize their readers.

      People simply aren't actively reading their content, comparing, contrasting, or even fact checking it.

      I suspect that this book could use an additional overhaul to cover many of these aspects.

    1. 3. Keep it interactiveScience tells us that passive learning—dull lectures, pages of written text—don’t work nearly as well as when learners interact in one way or another with the learning material or instructor. You should use opportunities to build interaction into your in-person, online, synchronous, and asynchronous courses:

      Learning needs to move past the the one-way information model of learning.

      The upskilling Imperative talks about this a bit when talking about

      • instructivist model of learning vs constructionist model of learning

       instructivist model of learning vs constructionist model of learning

  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. I try to keep a note of what I read, which I probably would not do if I was not writing a blog

      I've recently shifted into a frame of mind where I think that, if I'm reading something (something that isn't obviously news or entertainment), I should be making notes. If I'm not making notes, then I'm probably wasting my time reading that particular piece of content.

  6. Jan 2021
    1. Introduce students to the “explode to explain” strategy. When students “explode to explain,” they closely read a key sentence or two in a source, annotate, and practice explaining what they are thinking and learning.

      This is a specific strategy to include in an active reading session.

  7. Dec 2020
  8. Oct 2020
    1. 10 Active Learning Methods for Super Engaged Corporate Learners

      This article reviews the concept of active learning and its need in today's workplace training. Ten strategies to promote active learning via technology are discussed (collaborative virtual classrooms, mind mapping, brainstorming, scavenger hunts, role play/simulation, problem-based learning, discussion boards, teach back, jigsaw technique, flipped classroom, game based learning). This is a good resource for active learning strategies. (5/10)

    1. The default groups, that we talked about before, like domain users and domain admins are security groups. They're used to grant or deny access to IT resources.
    2. A distribution group, is only designed to group accounts and contacts for email communication. You can't use distribution groups for assigning permission to resources.
    1. The service that hosts copies of the Active Directory database are called domain controllers, or DCs
      • Hosts a replica of the Active Directory database and group policy objects.

      • Serve as DNS servers to provide name resolution and service discovery to clients.

      • Provides central authentication through a network security protocol called Kerberos

      • Decides whether or not clients have access to shared resources like file systems and printers

    2. Active Directory has been used to centrally manage networks of computers
      • A native service for Microsoft Windows
      • Knows how to speak LDAP protocol and can interoperate with Linux, OS-X and other non-windows hosts
      • Central repository of Group Policy Objects (GPOs)
    1. If you’d like to differentiate between the various functions a paragraph in a text can have, look out for signal words. For example, the following literal devices may indicate that the function is to build a mental model: schema, allegory, analogy, hypothesis, metaphor, representation, simile, theory. Put a corresponding “model” mark next to these.
  9. Sep 2020
  10. Jun 2020
  11. May 2020
  12. Dec 2019
  13. Nov 2019
    1. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff

      This research article explores an andragogical method of learning for the in-service training of nurses. In a study of a training period for 35 nurses, research found an empowering model of education that was characterized by self-directed learning and practical learning. This model suggests active participation, motivation, and problem-solving as key indicators of effective training for nurses. Rating 8/10

    1. This article, developed by faculty members at NAU, provides research behind and practices for technology-infused professional development (PD) programs. The authors first emphasize the importance of designing professional development for teachers around how they and their students learn best. Many approaches to PD have taken a one-size-fits-all approach in which learners take a more passive role in absorbing standardized information. The authors in this article suggest the need for a more effective model, one in which teachers play an active role in learning in ways that they find most effective for them and their students. Technology can support this PD through interactive and learner-centered instruction. Rating: 9/10

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. Using Technology to Help First-Gen Students

      This article highlights the need for and benefits of implementing more technology tools to support first-generation college students' learning, engagement, and success. For many first-gen students, especially those from low-income backgrounds, the transition to college can be challenging; this leads to lower retention rates, performance, and confidence. The authors, drawing off of research, suggest mobile devices and Web 2.0 technologies to prevent these challenges. Example of such tools include dictionary and annotation apps that are readily-accessible and aid in students' understanding of material. Fist-gen students can also use social media apps (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) to maintain supportive connections with family, peers, and mentors. Rating: 8/10

    1. We construct a graph from the unlabeled data to representthe underlying structure, such that each node represents adata point, and edges represent the inter-relationships be-tween them. Thereafter, considering the flow of beliefs in thisgraph, we choose those samples for labeling which minimizethe joint entropy of the nodes of the graph.

      ciekawe podejście

  14. Sep 2019
    1. Think-pair-share

      They're used to death, but for good reason. There are few things better than a good TPS for getting students warmed up for discussion. One can even allow the TPS to inform the entire lesson: if the TPS results in a class-generated set of questions or learning objectives, teach from that, or plan to teach from it in the next class session.

  15. Jun 2019
    1. Balance exploration and exploitation: the choice of examples to label is seen as a dilemma between the exploration and the exploitation over the data space representation. This strategy manages this compromise by modelling the active learning problem as a contextual bandit problem. For example, Bouneffouf et al.[9] propose a sequential algorithm named Active Thompson Sampling (ATS), which, in each round, assigns a sampling distribution on the pool, samples one point from this distribution, and queries the oracle for this sample point label. Expected model change: label those points that would most change the current model. Expected error reduction: label those points that would most reduce the model's generalization error. Exponentiated Gradient Exploration for Active Learning:[10] In this paper, the author proposes a sequential algorithm named exponentiated gradient (EG)-active that can improve any active learning algorithm by an optimal random exploration. Membership Query Synthesis: This is where the learner generates its own instance from an underlying natural distribution. For example, if the dataset are pictures of humans and animals, the learner could send a clipped image of a leg to the teacher and query if this appendage belongs to an animal or human. This is particularly useful if your dataset is small.[11] Pool-Based Sampling: In this scenario, instances are drawn from the entire data pool and assigned an informative score, a measurement of how well the learner “understands” the data. The system then selects the most informative instances and queries the teacher for the labels. Stream-Based Selective Sampling: Here, each unlabeled data point is examined one at a time with the machine evaluating the informativeness of each item against its query parameters. The learner decides for itself whether to assign a label or query the teacher for each datapoint. Uncertainty sampling: label those points for which the current model is least certain as to what the correct output should be. Query by committee: a variety of models are trained on the current labeled data, and vote on the output for unlabeled data; label those points for which the "committee" disagrees the most Querying from diverse subspaces or partitions:[12] When the underlying model is a forest of trees, the leaf nodes might represent (overlapping) partitions of the original feature space. This offers the possibility of selecting instances from non-overlapping or minimally overlapping partitions for labeling. Variance reduction: label those points that would minimize output variance, which is one of the components of error. Conformal Predictors: This method predicts that a new data point will have a label similar to old data points in some specified way and degree of the similarity within the old examples is used to estimate the confidence in the prediction.[13]
  16. Mar 2019
    1. What Makes for Effective Adult Learning

      This article provides a short overview or strategies and techniques to make adult learning effective. This article quotes adult learning researches like Knowles to provide information about meaningful learning experiences. This article provides idea for activities that fit in the category of affective adult learning.

    1. Active learning approaches

      This website is a blog hosted on an official EU platform that discusses what quality learning environments look like for adults. This webpage reviews traditional learning approaches versus active learning approaches how they contribute to a quality learning environment. Rating: 6/10 for including an easy to read comparison table but lacking in discussion.

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Engaging  Adult  Learners

      This article discusses some attributes that are unique to adult learners, such as that their learning is selective, self-directed, and often focused on solving problems. Therefore, it is important that instructors enable students to be autonomous and show them why it is important. Often in my instructional design, I start with the WIIFM (What's In It For Me?). This article supports my idea that my adult learners will choose to learn when it can solve a problem for them. This article also discusses active learning from an adult perspective, such as Socratic teaching. 9/10

    1. What the Research Says About Teaching Adults

      Colorado Community Colleges published this article to discuss research about teaching adults, focusing strongly on Knowles's six principles of andragogy. The main idea behind Knowles's principles is that adults learn because they decided to--because the information is relevant to them and they can benefit from attaining that knowledge. Therefore, the article states, activities that ask adult learners to discuss problems with each other will help them learn. This can be useful as I design instruction. 7/10

    1. Cognitivism

      Cognitivism challenge behaviorism by positing that humans are more complex than simple lumps that respond to external stimuli. Cognitivism claims that people must involve themselves in their learning and take an active role. In short, when information enters the mind, it must be processed before it becomes a change in behavior. 6/10

  17. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. This page is associated with Thiagi's interactive lectures, which are characterized in a book that is available via this site. This particular page involves links to types of interaction, such as games, puzzles, and so forth. It would be better to read or review the book, but since that option is not available, I will provide a link here. rating 2/5

    1. This is one of many pages that describes team based learning. The layout and typeface make this page easy enough to read. The content is rather brief and would suffice for someone who is trying to understand this approach and decide whether it is workable for their own adult learning and training context.

  18. Jan 2019
    1. Active-learning techniques — like sharing the responsibility for leading discussions or framing classroom expectations with our students — show them they indeed belong in this "scholarly space" and give them the confidence to engage with the course and one another.

      The ProfHacker article by Maha Bali and Steve Greenlaw explores this more concretely. Active learning for inclusion needs to be scaffolded in such a way that it does not reinforce the privilege of dominant cultures and personalities.

  19. Dec 2018
    1. Are All Training Examples Created Equal? An Empirical Study

      从此paper了解到了叫 Active learning 的有趣概念,这似乎和自己设计的连续参数训练数据采样池很接近。。。。

      这篇文章的主要工作是给出了一个在图像分类中关于训练样本重要性的研究,对于样本的重要度采用基于梯度的方法进行度量。文章的结论可能表明在深度学习中主动学习或许并不总是有效的。

  20. Nov 2018
    1. a decline in public sentiment for the sage on the stage figure,

      Do active learning pedagogical approaches contribute to this decline in interest/legitimacy?

    1. Yammer is Web 2.0 software which integrates with Microsoft 360 and allows users to communicate together and across the organization. It essentially functions as social networking software for corporations with the ability to collaborate on projects, maintain task lists, store files, documents and pictures all within a private enterprise network. In addition Yammer allows for the sharing of feedback and the management of group projects. Yammer is freemium software with a variety of custom add-ons. Licenses are currently issued for all learner participants and at this time no custom add-ons are necessary.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  21. Jul 2018
  22. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. It crept onward among ruinous houses and over the twinkling river.

      This melancholy passage was imbued with active voices for what we often would consider as still objects. For instance, the hallstand 'received' the weight of the coat, the sight of the streets 'thronged' with buyers, and here, the train 'crept' onward. These active voices were extremely vivid and characterized Joyce's writing style.

  23. Jun 2018
  24. via3.hypothes.is via3.hypothes.is
    1. he polling was nearly unani-mous that acquiring informationwas the easiest to do alone and thatthe other two goals seemed morecomplicated and would profit frompeer and instructor influence. This,then, led to a discussion of how topursue goals 2 and 3. These goalsare not achieved by reading orlistening to a lecturer—studentsmust actively do things in order tolearn. Students learn best (Davis,1993) when they take an active role:• When they discuss what theyare reading• When they practice what theyare learning• When they apply practices andideas
  25. Mar 2018
  26. Jan 2018
    1. Faculty development.

      Physical spaces for technology-based learning do not have to be student-only spaces, and actually giving faculty the choice to use these spaces as well may keep the curriculum fresh, the faculty updated on what works best for the students and students interested and feeling like their learning needs and styles are being met.

    2. it also required elusive buy-in from administrators and a new approach to thinking about the classroom experience.

      There are benefits and drawbacks to such modern learning spaces. On one hand, the space(s) being used for technological advancement need to be designated, built/remodeled and shown to be used regularly by students, this process takes a long time and a lot of funding to perfect, which is what administration do not want to hear. Such spaces do not have to be used only for online courses and studying, which is a point made later in this article, it can be versatile and useful for all students if designed right. As technology improves, educators with more training in technology are becoming more widespread and students utilize online resources and technology more, the necessity of having these spaces increases.

    3. active learning and technology engagement.
  27. Oct 2017
    1. User authentication and credentials validation through direct access to the organizational LDAP or Active Directory server

      Active Directory support

  28. Sep 2017
    1. In 2005, the figure had raised to 1%. They are now responsible for more carbon-dioxide emissions per year than Argentina or the Netherlands and, if current trends hold, their emissions will have grown four-fold by 2020, reaching 670m tonnes

      How is information, for example, a conversation accounted for in this model? As we go forward and find more efficient ways to store and convey information in fewer 1s and 0s, must we constantly reevaluate this relationship? Passive vs Active storage of information seems to be key here as well.

    1. And most people genetically need adults, because, again, this is cultural learning. You learn from other people, so it’s odd to learn by reading. Once you start interacting with a computer, you start wondering, what kind of initiative could the computer actually take? What kinds of the equivalent of knowledge could the computer actually deal with? [Computer scientist John] McCarthy got off on this before anybody. Papert was working with [Marvin] Minsky at MIT, so they had been already thinking about this when I started thinking about the Dynabook. My thought was, “Man, we have to have an AI inside of it,” because it’s the next logical step after a well-written essay.
    1. And most people genetically need adults, because, again,this is cultural learning. You learn from other people, so it’s odd to learn byreading.Once you start interacting with a computer, you start wondering, what kind ofinitiative could the computer actually take? What kinds of the equivalent ofknowledge could the computer actually deal with? [Computer scientist John]McCarthy got off on this before anybody. Papert was working with [Marvin]Minsky at MIT, so they had been already thinking about this when I startedthinking about the Dynabook. My thought was, “Man, we have to have an AIinside of it,” because it’s the next logical step after a well-written essay.

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    Annotators

  29. Aug 2017
    1. The embedding of maker culture in K–12 education has made students active contributors to the knowledge ecosystem rather than merely participants and consumers of knowledge.

      How does this get balanced with privacy concerns? I have yet to see an argument or practice that successfully navigates this tension?

  30. May 2017
    1. TPS Reflective Exercises

      TPS as metacognition - worth trying out. Would have to budget time for it. Could we combine it with something to capture data? connect to qualtrics or google forms

  31. Mar 2017
    1. trying to answer questions—or to even foster questions in the first place

      This strikes me as a crucial point: using this tool allowed you to shift from a traditional, considerably passive learning style (they're still engaging with the text, but alone) to a more potentially active one.

  32. Feb 2017
  33. Jul 2016
    1. Large lecture classes may go through the content too quickly for the typical student to understand. That's why so many schools follow the practice of breaking the class cohort into smaller sections led by teaching assistants.
  34. May 2016
    1. “learners must be actively engaged in learning” to achieve deep understanding (Barkley, Cross, & Major, 2005, p. 10).

      This might be a useful reference for further study into active learning

  35. Apr 2016
  36. Mar 2016
    1. Many times, the work we do as educators is actually taking away some of the most powerful learning from our students.
  37. Jan 2016
    1. Apprendre à programmer permet aux enfants un nouveau rapport aux technologies: de consommateur interactif de manuels scolaires numérisés à la capacité de créer des ressources éducatives numériques et même des mini-jeux.
  38. Dec 2015
    1. slow readers down

      Does the slow reading movement parallel the slow food one? In some ways, there might be a point against “consumption” in both cases. Or, at least, utilitarianism.

    1. They suggested that the CHA’s heat infra-structures conjoined wastefulness and neglect in ways that encouraged tenants’attachments to heat and, with respect to heat consumption, placed them perma-nently beyond practices of self-sufficiency

      I completely agree with this statement. They were unable to control levels of heat within their homes so when it consistently stayed too hot, they opened windows to let in cold air... hello.. That's like having your sprinklers on for your yard when it's pouring rain outside.. and there's a drought.

  39. Nov 2015
  40. Oct 2015
    1. follow the lead of the sciences

      Again, I don't get all the anti-science rhetoric and anti-intellectualism when it comes to talking about teaching. Was active learning invented in science classes? No. Was John Dewey a scientist? No. Either way, does any of that mean that we should reject something because it was done in the sciences or said by a scientist?

      There are whole journals devoted to research on teaching humanities topics: history, philosophy, writing, literature, etc. All ignored in this article.

    2. Eliot was a chemist, so perhaps we should take his criticisms with a grain of salt.

      Again, there is plenty of research showing that active learning is better in areas other than the sciences and math. See the section on History education in the free book How Students Learn, for example: http://www.nap.edu/read/10126/chapter/3

      or the book Doing History, or work by Sam Wineburg and other history education researchers.

    3. vogue

      I wouldnt't call it a "craze" or a "vogue" when people have been arguing for it for over 100 years and there are now thousands of empirical research articles demonstrating that it is superior to traditional lecture. Rejecting active learning in favor of traditional lecture is akin to the 19th doctors who rejected the idea that they needed to wash their hands: https://edtechdev.wordpress.com/2014/06/03/healthcare/

    4. 2014 study showed that test scores in science and math courses improved after professors replaced lecture time with “active learning” methods like group work

      It's not just math and science. There are studies showing active learning is better than lecture for history teaching and other areas, too. Here's just one: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/B:IHIE.0000047415.48495.05#page-1

    1. Pour le contexte… Girard est instigateur d’un projet qui a donné lieu à un manifeste sur la pédagogie active.

      Ce manifeste a donné lieu à un débat.

      Le texte de Tisseron auquel répond Girard a été partagé par Jacques Cool sur Facebook (connu sous le nom de « Jacques McCool » parce que la plateforme n’accepte pas son vrai nom).

  41. May 2015
    1. I've been spending a lot of time lately learning how to use Selenium WebDriver, the premier automation toolkit for functional testing of Web software.

      A /lot/ of time. But it's turning out to be well spent.