311 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Pastor-Barriuso, R., Pérez-Gómez, B., Hernán, M. A., Pérez-Olmeda, M., Yotti, R., Oteo-Iglesias, J., Sanmartín, J. L., León-Gómez, I., Fernández-García, A., Fernández-Navarro, P., Cruz, I., Martín, M., Delgado-Sanz, C., Larrea, N. F. de, Paniagua, J. L., Muñoz-Montalvo, J. F., Blanco, F., Larrauri, A., & Pollán, M. (2020). Infection fatality risk for SARS-CoV-2 in community dwelling population of Spain: Nationwide seroepidemiological study. BMJ, 371, m4509. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m4509

  2. Feb 2021
  3. Jan 2021
    1. How We Make Sense of Time

      Use this article along with Sing, Unburied, Sing to expand discussion of various spatial representations/ cultural conceptions of time.

  4. Dec 2020
  5. Nov 2020
    1. Rosemary enhanced the protective efficacy of AREDS and led to the greatest effect on the retinal genome in animals reared in high environmental light. Chronic administration of rosemary antioxidants may be a useful adjunct to the therapeutic benefit of AREDS in slowing disease progression in AMD.

      This is not in the least surprising. Dietary antioxidants also protect the skin during sunlight exposure.

      Oxidative stress likely also plays a role in diabetic retinopathy. It plays a role in the aging process itself. That said, there is probably a limit to protective powers of antioxidants. Nonetheless, I don't think that that limit has ever been realized in any population. I doubt we've even come close in rats.

    1. Fig 1

      Note that, though folate and B12 were given IV before and after surgery, it did not have an immediate effect. The NO induced rise in homocysteine was not blunted by the end of surgery. However, postoperative homocysteine was lowered to below baseline on all 3 measurement days. The NO induced rise in homocysteine lasted 2 days postoperatively.

      Unsurprisingly, this suggests a lag time between B vitamin administration and homocysteine drop. Thus, what I'd really like to see is a study administering B vitamins 1 day prior to NO use.

    1. Curcumin, but not fish oil, reduces postprandial glycaemic response and insulin demand for glucose control.

      This backs up the two studies on fasting glucose in diabetes and per-diabetes. It is also a higher quality study (crossover design).

    1. Reviewing pre-prints with hypothes.is?

      After conversion using the hypothes.is API tool: https://jonudell.info/h/CopyAnnotations/ , this annotation has been copied to a public annotation (which I subsequently edited).

      Drawback: you can only use it with one user log-in and on a single web domain (so you'd have to run it for every single article someone has reviewed).

      Original annotation (see in group—that one stays there, usefully!)

      This annotation should be private to the group only.

      Tags are permitted, they can be any free text.

  6. Oct 2020
    1. An Evaluation of Problem-based Learning Supported by Information and Communication Technology: A Pilot Study

      (Under "Viewing Options", select PDF.) In this article, Ernawaty and Sujono (2019) summarize results of a study funded by the Research and Higher Education Directorate of Indonesia. The study aimed to evaluate the cogency of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in problem based learning (PBL) and traditional teaching methods (TTM) based upon learner test scores. The concepts of PBL, TTM, and implications of ICTs are briefly reviewed. Results of the study revealed that PBL with the support of an ICT yielded the highest test scores. (6/10)

  7. Sep 2020
    1. Ip, A., Ahn, J., Zhou, Y., Goy, A. H., Hansen, E., Pecora, A. L., Sinclaire, B. A., Bednarz, U., Marafelias, M., Mathura, S., Sawczuk, I. S., Underwood, J. P., Walker, D. M., Prasad, R., Sweeney, R. L., Ponce, M. G., LaCapra, S., Cunningham, F. J., Calise, A. G., … Goldberg, S. L. (2020). Hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of outpatients with mildly symptomatic COVID-19: A multi-center observational study. MedRxiv, 2020.08.20.20178772. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.20.20178772

  8. Aug 2020
    1. Nguyen, L. H., Drew, D. A., Graham, M. S., Joshi, A. D., Guo, C.-G., Ma, W., Mehta, R. S., Warner, E. T., Sikavi, D. R., Lo, C.-H., Kwon, S., Song, M., Mucci, L. A., Stampfer, M. J., Willett, W. C., Eliassen, A. H., Hart, J. E., Chavarro, J. E., Rich-Edwards, J. W., … Zhang, F. (2020). Risk of COVID-19 among front-line health-care workers and the general community: A prospective cohort study. The Lancet Public Health, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30164-X

    1. “In 2004, Cleveland Clinic physiologist Guang Yue wanted to know if merely thinking about lifting weights was enough to increase strength. Study subjects were divided into four groups. One group tried to strengthen their finger muscles with physical exercise; one tried to strengthen their finger muscles by only visualizing the exercise; another tried to increase arm strength through visualization; while the last group did nothing at all. The trial lasted twelve weeks.When it was over, those who did nothing saw no gains. The group that relied on physical training saw the greatest increase in strength-at 53 percent. But it’s the mental groups where things got curious. Folks who did no physical training but merely imagined their fingers going through precise exercise motions saw a 35 percent increase in strength, while the ones who visualized arm exercises saw a 13.5 percent increase in strength.”Let’s review — these participants did NOTHING BUT VISUALIZING and saw an increase of up to 35% in strength!But things are all the more convincing when you consider that a few years before Yue’s studies, neuroscientists found no difference between performing an action and merely imagining oneself performing that action-the same neuronal circuits fire in either case.

      Experiments have shown that simply visualizing an can have great impacts.

    1. More information about limitations and exceptions to copyright

      Under more information about limitations and exceptions to copyright add section titled Case Studies: Case studies provide valuable information relating to the state of affairs in various countries, as well as the opposing views when debating copyright issues.

      • South Africa: a case study of politics and the global economics of limitations and exceptions to copyright. The current debate in South Africa regarding proposed amendments to the Copyright Bill allows showcases the different sides of the debate, and how legal frameworks, e.g. the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa also informs decision making.
      1. US Government Threatening To Kill Free Trade With South Africa After Hollywood Complained It Was Adopting American Fair Use Principles, by Mike Masnick, 4 November 2019.
      2. South Africa’s Copyright Amendment Bill – one year on, by Denise Nicholson, 30 March 2020. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
      3. South Africa’s Copyright Amendment Bill Returned to Parliament for Further Consideration, Mike Palmedo, 22 June 2020. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
      4. See the light and pass the Copyright Amendment Bill, by Mugwena Maluleke, Tebogo Sithathu, Jack Devnarain, Tusi Fokane, Ben Cashdan and Jace Nair, 24 June 2020. © Mail & Guardian Online.
      5. South African President’s Reservations to Copyright Bill Not Supported by Law, by Sean Flynn, 13 July 2020. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

      For a comprehensive list of materials relating to the South African Copyright Amendment Bill processes, see Copyright and Related Issues: USTR GSP trade threats re: Bill, list compiled and amended by Denis Nicholson

    1. Dave, D. M., Friedson, A. I., Matsuzawa, K., Sabia, J. J., & Safford, S. (2020). Were Urban Cowboys Enough to Control COVID-19? Local Shelter-in-Place Orders and Coronavirus Case Growth (Working Paper No. 27229; Working Paper Series). National Bureau of Economic Research. https://doi.org/10.3386/w27229

  9. Jul 2020
    1. Meyer, B., Torriani, G., Yerly, S., Mazza, L., Calame, A., Arm-Vernez, I., Zimmer, G., Agoritsas, T., Stirnemann, J., Spechbach, H., Guessous, I., Stringhini, S., Pugin, J., Roux-Lombard, P., Fontao, L., Siegrist, C.-A., Eckerle, I., Vuilleumier, N., & Kaiser, L. (2020). Validation of a commercially available SARS-CoV-2 serological immunoassay. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.06.024