919 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Every school with master’s degrees is at some stage of process in moving these programs online. Save for a very small number of elite programs, the model of full-time residential master’s is in decline. The question appears to be not if master's programs will move online, but how they will do so.

      Implications for libraries...

  2. Jun 2019
    1. heSchoolissmallr-10or13onlyattend&thosenotregular.Itismuchembarrusoodforthewunhof.ateacher,whosetimecanbemostlfdevotedtoit

      the school at this area is small, with irregular attendance (from both students and teacher)

    2. r8.nowtoldthem:hoIwas.&thatastheirfriend&hisfriend,hehadinvitedmotnaooo)anyhimonhisvisittot.Hespoketothemontheimportanceoftheirhaaeainglearnintotofcultivatingtheirlands&havinschoolsfortheirhildr.Ithenreadtothemsome'ortionaofScrip.fromtranlanwhichIhad&expressedtothem,throuhtheInterpreter,htohris.uubliowerenowdoingfor:eroftheirneoplo,&*h~ttheirfriendswouldarelongsendsomeonetoinstructtheir3hidron.&tellthemabout“0d&JanusChrist&heavoniftheydosiradit.-muatfirstcollootallbigband&tal‘TheChiefrepliedthihhehinaol.hadnochildren,ithathewiththembeforohecoul

      the expedition expresses to the Natives the importance of cultivating their land and building a school, the writer reads them scripture

    3. twillbedifnculttokeepchildrenlongatschoolamongtheseIndians,unlesstheyarefed,onaccountoftheirmigratoryhabitsandthedifncultyofobtainingprovision.Manyofthemresideatseveraldifferentplacesduringtheyear

      expect low attendance because of hunger and migration

    4. WithregardtoourprospectsforimmediatelybenentingtheIndians,Ihardlyknowwhattosay.

      sent by the Board to educate them and build a school

    1. The belief that humans are essentially active, free and strive for meaning in personal terms

      sounds obvious when you say it like that.

  3. May 2019
    1. Schools can ensure their curriculum are up to date and training students for the areas of science with the most potential for advancement

      This completely flies in the face of the need for more basic science research which is far more likely to create vast potential advancement rather than focusing on smaller edge cases.

    1. Six key themes emerged from the data: benefits of an ePortfolio at the curriculum level, ePortfolios as an enabling technology, the value of reflection, the role of user support, the speed and quality of feedback, and mitigating distance and isolation.

      The role of reflection is important when considering education as a transformational experience. This could be a key distinguishing feature between training and education.

    1. The name "Cahokia" is from an aboriginal people who lived in the area during the 17th century. 

      The name of the site comes from a culture that inhabited the site years after its initial construction. The name was given to it by French colonizers.

    1. There was also an astronomical observatory (“Woodhenge”), consisting of a circle of wooden posts.

      This term "Woodhenge" further points to an acknowledgment of the similarities between this site and other pyramid sites.

    1. Annotations we made during the education workshop.

    2. We should annotate this program! If any program should be annotated, it should be this one. I can't get out to DC this month, but I am VERY interested in this topic. I will definitely be cyber-stalking this conference.

    1. economic returns of education after high school

      Is change in lifetime income potential a way of measuring higher education's social contribution? Is it too broad? Can it account for distributive injustice?

    2. rankings have focused on the input side of the equation, not the output.”

      This is incredibly ham-handed, but not necessarily a bad question to be asking, esp. as digital education begins disrupting brick-and-mortar schools. Can we be more explicit about the value we add as educators?

    1. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

  4. Apr 2019
    1. Almost every social network of note had an early signature proof of work hurdle. For Facebook it was posting some witty text-based status update. For Instagram, it was posting an interesting square photo. For Vine, an entertaining 6-second video. For Twitter, it was writing an amusing bit of text of 140 characters or fewer. Pinterest? Pinning a compelling photo. You can likely derive the proof of work for other networks like Quora and Reddit and Twitch and so on. Successful social networks don't pose trick questions at the start, it’s usually clear what they want from you.

      And this is likely the reason that the longer form blogs never went out of style in areas of higher education where people are still posting long form content. This "proof of work" is something they ultimately end up using in other areas.

      Jessifer example of three part post written for a journal that was later put back into long form for publication.

    1. There are many different theories of adult learning, including: andragogy, neuroscience, experiential learning, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. All these theories have one goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner. 

      adult learning theories including andragogy, experiential learning

    1. stressful but fascinating

      It seems like these two words sum up this last week pretty well for a majority of the group. There has been a lot of information to take in, within a short amount of time. Although it has been a bit on the chaotic side here and there, most of the class can agree that the more we see, the more fascinating it becomes. I think everyone is looking forward to attaining more clarity for the program as a whole. The enthusiasm is contagious. It seems the whole process is new for everyone, and everyone is excited for the adventure.

    1. Having our children memorize facts and figures, sit passively in class, and take mundane standardized tests completely defeats the purpose.

      To learn with enjoyment, we need to have the space to explore, experiment and fail. We need to have ownership, empowerment and the ability to be creative in the process.

    2. how much of what I learned was never actually useful later in life, and how many of my critical lessons for success I had to pick up on my own

      How relevant is the content education delivers for real-life scenarios?

      I have been there too, most of the relevant lessons and knowledge I have discovered myself in a inquisitive and curiosity quest to learn and understand more.

    1. Hi I'm and Oberman and I'm from much Paladin State University of Denver and I'm using hypothesis currently in a course and so I teach social work.

      Ann starts speaking here about her experience teach with Hypothesis in the classroom. Close this sidebar and click on the text to advance the video to this point (53:29). Ann speaks for about 4 minutes. Worth watching till the end.

    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
    1. Elizabeth Evans Getzel is the Director for Transition Innovations at Virginia Commonwealth University and has a long history of working with students with disabilities in higher education. The article focuses on how the integration of support for students with disabilities is extremely important to their persistence and this includes technology integration and requires buy-in from the faculty.

    1. Author Melissa A. Venable, Ph.D. has spent her career working in career development, technology and instructional design. The article outlines technology options for career professionals to use with distance learners and how to conduct an assessment to ensure needs are being met.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. Author Catherine C. Schifter has had a long background in Educational Psychology and this article from 1999 shows her dedication to the field and provides an analysis of educators in distance learning and the evaluation that Dr. Schifter did of these programs and the motivation of faculty members who were teaching these courses at the time.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. D. Christopher Brooks, Director of Research, and Mark McCormack, Senior Director of Analytics & Research, at EDUCAUSE bring together this comprehensive report that outlines Higher Education trends for 2019. This report does feel more technical in nature, but they bring it together in a way that is laid out to be reader friendly. The 20-year technology predictions are valuable and there is a focus on using the report to plan for the future.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. This article is authored by Farouk Dey, formerly of Stanford University and currently the Vice Provost for Integrative Learning and Life Design at Johns Hopkins. Dey offers an overview of the transformation that college career services have gone through over the past 100 years and showcases 10 areas where career services will continue to change in the future, including the scope of how technology will allow for a wider reach.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article brings together several higher education professional who all work for Georgia Tech. They are able to touch on different areas of how technology has shaped their work and the reach it has allowed their university.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This report is a supplemental piece specifically for Higher Education in response to the National Education Technology plan. The report is a lengthy read but offers a combination of data, examples, case studies and additional resources. The report focuses on the changing landscape of higher education and the changing qualities of what a student in college looks like (i.e. not the traditionally known 18 year old, fresh out of high school). The report also acknowledges the history fo traditional learning (i.e. paper and pencil) and how higher educational not only needs to embrace technology for the classroom use but also for the analytics implications that can help with topics such as retention.

      Rating: 10/10. Very in depth article, packed with examples and recommendations.

    1. Scott L. Howell is the Assistant to the Dean of Continuing Education at Brigham Young University and has a long career track record in the area of instructional design and online learning. The article is a bit ambitious in tackling 32 trends, but provides a good review of additional literature during each addressed trend.

      Rating: 9/10. The article itself is interesting, but its best use is the direction towards additional readings that it offers.

    1. The author, Susan Grajek, formerly of Yale University is the Vice President for Communities and Research at EDUCAUSE. Grajek brings together 5 leaders in higher education and technology to discuss the future of technology in the higher education arena. The article addresses the progress that needs to be made, especially in the adult education portion of higher eduction and acknowledges that the traditional 18-22 college student population is very small and that there is so much more of the market that needs to be reached.

      Rating: 9/10.

  5. Mar 2019
    1. Knowing an injustice is taking place may make educators feel all the more helpless,without a productive avenue of resistance.
    2. Everyday acts of resistance require literacy educators to navigate seemingly indissoluble contradictions.

      Is this basically saying that we need to teach educators how to say "no"?

    1. The world’s largest selection of courses

      Udemy is an online platform where experts in various fields can create paid courses. You can learn languages, web design, photography, musical instruments all in your own time. The platform also allows for extensive ranking and reviews to be put on instructors and courses to keep the quality high. Instruction is inexpensive and self-paced. it is larger aimed at teenagers and adult learners and focuses on skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges

      From Springer Link, this is an abstract from a book titled, Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges. While the entire content is not here, if purchased, this book/download could offer a large amount of useful information about this topic. It covers learning typically associated with technology such as social networking, game-based learning and digital making.

      Rating 7/10

    1. Technology Infused Professional Development: A Framework for Development and Analysis

      Technology Infused Professional Development by Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education relays information about the best practices for technology to be a large part of professional development. Knowledge base consists of three major domains. They are knowledge of learner, knowledge of content and knowledge of best ways and means to help students learn. Learning is considered both an active and social process. True, deep learning must be applied to new situation and this is not easy with new learning. "If we don't change the direction we are going, we're likely to end up where we are heading"

      Rating 10/10

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. Educational technology professional development as transformative learning opportunities

      Educational technology professional development can transform learning opportunities. This article focuses on adult learning theory as technology can be "intimidating and frustrating." All of this spiked my interest and I was excited to read more. However, to read more you must purchase the content of the entire article. So, in all this left me disappointed. Rating 2/10

    1. "In this fascinating book, Tony Wagner addresses one of our most urgent questions: How do we create the next generation of innovators? By telling the stories of young creators, and by taking us inside cutting-edge programs, Wagner shows that the answer isn't to double-down on outmoded, formulaic solutions--but to embrace the principles of play, passion, and purpose. Creating Innovators is important reading for anyone concerned about the future."--Daniel H. Pink, author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

      Reference this in coursework provided in a liberal arts college.

    1. nontraditional students. The education department at OSU-M is housed within the School of Teaching and Learning and the Integrated Teaching and Learning (ITL) section. The Integrated Teaching and Learning section of the College of Education serves those preservice teachers who are studying to be teachers of children age 3 to Grade 8. The Ohio State University Master of Education degree, the degree that offers course requirements for licensure in elementary and middle childhood, is a five-quarter, graduate licensure program. Students enter the program with a B.A. in Elementary Education or a similar field. We license approximately 24 teachers per year. Class size ranges from 12 through 24 students. During the bachelor’s program, student studies are focused on theories of child development and learning, primary reading and language courses, general liberal arts courses, content courses, and two beginning field courses. At least one field placement during the undergraduate coursework takes place in an urban school. Following admission to the graduate program in education, students begin their coursework in general pedagogy and specific methods: social studies, mathematics, language arts, reading, and science. During this year and a half of studies, students are in the field each week for 4-10 hours and have a 12- to15-day period toward the end of the two methods block quarters when they create and implement lessons in their field classroom. All students complete two separate placements in teams of two. Field placements are primarily in suburban and rural schools. Following these field placements, students have one quarter of student teaching and one quarter for a master’s project, including a comprehensive portfolio and a research paper. Experiences With Technology During the undergraduate program students take one technology course. This course is intended to provide students with exposure to the basic knowledge of computer hardware and an introduction to traditional educational software. During this course, students are required to complete an “All About Me,” project (see Powerpoint 1) for which students familiarize themselves with tools such as the scanner, digital camera, clipart, and presentation software. Figure 1. The technology teaching lab After students are admitted to the master’s licensure program, they take one basic technology course that covers other technologies available to elementary education teachers (e.g., Ellison cutters, laminating machines, filmstrip projectors, video projectors, enlargers), and they continue their development of computer knowledge. The two courses, one in the undergraduate program and the other in the graduate program, are the only two stand-alone courses on technology. After students have completed the basic technology course in the graduate program, they begin their methods courses. Throughout the methods coursework, students are asked to use technology when appropriate to enhance their teaching. In addition to this expectation, instructors of the methods courses integrate technology into their teaching to serve as a model of ways in which technology can enhance learning in the particular subject areas. During the two methods course quarters, students attend a lab course entitled the Technology Teaching Lab (TTL). The goal for this course is to increase the use of technology in students’ lessons in ways that will enhance their teaching. The TTL is a series of 2-hour labs that runs concurrently with our methods blocks. The purpose of this lab is to provide the preservice teachers in our elementary education program opportunities to create, with assistance, technology-enhanced lessons for their field placements. The lab course provides the students with instruction, opportunities, and equipment to take their technology-enhanced lessons directly to the field.

      The Ohio State University is now integrating technology into their Education Master's program. Students are expected as undergraduates to take an introductory technology course. As part of the master's program, students are required to take another technology course. Students are also expected to integrate technology into their two methods courses. To help with this they have a "lab" (which is traditionally thought to parallel science courses) with technology instructors to help them with their methods courses.<br> Instructors are expected to model the technology integration and help students plan a curriculum that integrates technology to aid in the learning of most students.

      Rating 9/10

    1. ommunities using technology in ambitious and innovative ways to support adult learners. Our Beacons’ stories of how they address common challenges show what it takes to develop and scale effective adult learning across multiple partnerships. Through their work at the leading edge of integrating technology into adult learning, we can understand and amplify new models and practices.

      The Beacon Project focuses on ways in which multiple companies have taken to using technology to train adult learners. One example is a company called Access Green. This successful company was started by a wealthy enturpeanur that had been trained at one of the best business schools in the country. He believes that he can provide the same training to the underprivileged through technology. This is his way of giving back and not just helping these people by giving them a job, but rather an education. Rating 7/10

    1. Adult enrollment in higher education grew by more than 50 percent between 1991 and 2011, according to U.S. News & World Report. This trend shows that today’s educators and corporate trainers must adapt to the different needs, learning styles and challenges presented by teaching adult students. By understanding adult students, you can become a better educator or trainer. Here are six key teaching strategies for making lessons more applicable for adult learners. Keep It Relevant Adult students truly latch onto lessons they feel are relevant. They have to understand how the skills they learn will improve their daily lives. If they believe a lesson will have a measurable impact, they will be far more likely to be engaged and internalize the lesson. How can this be achieved? Education resource eLearning Industry recommends considering the “real value in the educational experience you’re providing.” While teaching adults, educators and trainers should consider the real-world impact on how a person works or interacts with  family. Remind adult students that a math lesson can help them better understand what they do every day or that the course will give them the experience they need to advance in their careers. Real-world outcomes will inspire an adult student to put forth more effort in a course. Remember Student Backgrounds One of the many differences between adult learners and their younger counterparts is experience. Adult education has to draw on the fact that stu

      Adults going back to further their education has grown by 50 percent between 1991 and 2011! With these staggering numbers, educators must remember 6 effective strategies for teaching adults. The 6 strategies are:

      1. Keep it Relevant
      2. Remember Student Background - adult learners have far more experience and more background.
      3. Integrate Emotion into Lessons - helps students to connect.
      4. Encourage Exploration - didactic teaching - allowing activities and assignments to stay static but topic to be explored.
      5. Make Assignments Convenient - With more people working, assignments need to be broken into smaller more manageable parts.
      6. Always Offer Feedback- The quicker feedback the better! Rating 8/10
    1. The Wired Classroom: Leveraging Technology to Engage Adult Learners

      This article discusses how even though instructors may be hesitant to include new technologies in their learning environments, doing so can enhance the student experience. It specifically explore the use of twitter for classroom discussions, simulation tools, and the LMS systems universities use currently to support online work. Soliciting feedback from students to ask how tools are working for them is important for evolving the classroom to fit student needs.

    1. U.S. Through these stories from and discussions with our Beacons and partners, we offer educators and developers specific examples of how to incorporate technology into adult learning in highly effective yet affordable ways

      Digital promise is an organization that connects adult learners with methods to implement technology in useful ways to improve education. The website hosts a network of educators and the programs they offer to improve basic math and literacy skills in U.S. adults to help with job training and career advancement. There is also a mico-credentialing program they extend to training programs that endorse those that have learned or gained specific skills. Rating 5/10

    1. Report: Why Tech for Adult Learning So Often Misses the Mark

      Popular article. This article overviews the U.S. Department of Education LINCS system report which shows that there is a disconnect between those that design adult learning technology and the stakeholders (learners and employers) that plan to use it. Often technology is retrofitted, as it was originally intended for K-12 and won't work in the ways adult learners and educators need for them. One of the main ways to circumvent this is to design technology for a specific problem that needs to be solved, instead of starting with the solution. Rating 4/10

    1. Toward constructivism for adult learners in online learning environments

      Research article. This paper explores how constructivism is specifically useful for adult education in the online environment. It is especially important for adult learners to interact with each other in order to creating meaningful collaborative experiences. It is also important for online educators to create and environment where students can share and discuss ideas in a safe space. It should also require high-order thinking skills and problem solving that relates to their real lives. Rating 10/10

    1. Application  of  Virtual  and  Augmented  Reality  tothe  Field  of  Adult  Education

      Research Article from the Adult Education Research Conference. This article examines the history of VR as a tool to train military personnel, and medical professionals and how future directions of VR could be used for other adult education situations especially due to their low risk learning environment. The authors examine how VR could also be used in gaming, arts, entertainment, marketing and business fields. This is important because VR environments also allow students to exploring changing technology and practice self-learning. Rating 6/10

    1. Report: It's Time for Ed Tech to Tackle the Adult Learner

      This article recommends the way in which education technology should adapt to be aimed at adult learners. Specifically that education should all students to assess themselves as they go and fill in any missing gaps in knowledge. It should also be relevant to their life needs, and connect their own experiences back into the learning environment. I feel most of this is known in adult learning theory in general, however this article is really aimed at those outside the industry and is a very helpful summary in this way. Rating 7/10

    1. Top 10 Tools For The Digital Classroom

      Article overviews tools in technology that are useful for bringing learners together in the classroom, especially in ways that enhance their interaction with digital media and each other. Although many of them seem to be aimed at younger learners I feel like some of the tools, like Quizlet, and Prezi are especially useful for adult learners. Rating 10/10

    1. An investigation into the attraction and completion rates of MOOCs Sergey Kruchinin

      Research Paper. Discusses the use of MOOCs and their completion rates as tools for education. MOOCs are often touted as the best way to get education to the popular masses. The study shows that MOOCs coming from universities with major names on just a few platforms like Coursera tend to be the most successful in terms of completion rate. Courses that have auto grading features are more attractive to students, probably because they get feedback immediately. Rating 4/10

    1. Adult Learning in the Context of Comparative Higher Education

      Research Paper. Although education is determined by "engagement, empowerment, experience, and evidence" the way adults learned, and what they have learned across societies differs greatly and impacts the effectiveness of higher education and problem solving. Adults as significant instigators of global change need opportunities for literacy development, dialogue, acquisition of self-reliance skills, and the ability to adapt to change. Rating 5/10

    1. This website is a free website that allows for users to access summaries of learning theories, educational guides and much more!

    1. New Media Consortium Horizon Report This page provides a link to the annual Horizon Report. The report becomes available late in the year. The report identifies emerging technologies that are likely to be influential and describes the timeline and prospective impact for each. Unlike the link to top learning tools that anyone can use, the technologies listed here may be beyond the ability of the average trainer to implement. While it is informative and perhaps a good idea to stay abreast of these listings, it is not necessarily something that the average instructional designer can apply. Rating: 3/5

    1. 7 things you should know about This page offers two lists of technologies. One relates to learning technologies and the other to campus IT. In either case, one clicks "see all" and is shown a list of many up and coming technologies. One can click the links to get a discussion of seven things the user should know about these technologies. Reports are two pages and follow a set format that includes a brief story or illustration. These introduce the visitor to the use of the technology but do not provide extensive explanation; it is an introduction. Technologies listed on these pages are often but not always technologies that the average instructional designer may put to use. Rating: 3/5

    1. Campus Technology magazine This is the website for a magazine that is also published on paper. Articles are freely accessible (a subscription is not required). The design of the page is messy and as with any magazine, the content varies, but the site does give a description of the use of technology in higher education. The same technologies can sometimes be applied in adult learning in general. Rating 4/5

    1. Welcome to AAACE The mission of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) is to provide leadership for the field of adult and continuing education by expanding opportunities for adult growth and development; unifying adult educators; fostering the development and dissemination of theory, research, information, and best practices; promoting identity and standards for the profession; and advocating relevant public policy and social change initiatives.

      This is the website of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education. This website offers information on the annual conference, as well as online journals and scholarly publications. There is information about membership. Rating 3/5 The site does not contain a great deal of information but it seems important to include a professional association in this set of links.

    1. The valuable lesson from all this is that inducing competition among administrative units helps invigorate key stakeholders to work in tandem in order to achieve intended outcomes.

      Yes, competition, no doubt helps to bring out maximum results. But we must also understand that competition can also lead to worst of behaviours. About competition among schools and blocks: it has often been noticed that in order to comply with the government orders, or simply to be adjudged the so-called "best" in the district/state, schools and blocks often resort to unfair means. Scores are fabricated, often teachers helping out students during tests (that is, if they are themselves capable of, which is another topic for discussion elsewhere), send wrong information about student performance reports and may also have ghost students.

      Therefore, I have found the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) by Pratham Foundation to be one of the best and most credible sources of state of education in the country. They take survey by going from house to house and do not rely on the stats provided by the schools. The only drawback is that it rural based survey; comparison of rural and urban divide is difficult to gauge.

    1. In rethinking education to cope with rapid changes atthe threshold of the twenty-first century, innovation, techno-logy, and research are indispensable tools of education.Failure to innovate by and large means repeating yesterday'seducational programmes and strategies tomorrow, which willonly further jeopardize education's reputation as contributorto development efforts. Educational innovations are imperati-ve, and would no doubt be effective if they are research-basedand imbued with technology of education (i.e. systematicapproach to the teaching-learning process); and tech

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    2. of the extent to which and how cultures vary in theirresponses to disability, and the impact of those differences on the developing child.‘Developmental disabilities’ is a term used by Japanese educ

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    1. A nano-porous carbon composite membrane has been found to display high water flux due to exceptionally high surface diffusion, together with an excellent salt rejection [2616, 2958].

      With an excellent ability to reject salt, how often does membrane fouling become an issue when desalinating seawater? to a point where it causes water flux decline and lowers the quality of the water produced.

      ~ Anthony Y.

    1. But when you think of it, our educational institutions aren’t built to recognize the complexity between pasts and futures. In effect, we build superhighways with one on ramp, and lots of off ramps that lead to dead ends.

      I'm going to forgive the automobilist metaphor because the point is just so dang right!

  6. Feb 2019
    1. For example, select a given capability, at any level in the hierarchy, and ask yourself if it can be usefully changed by any means that can be given consideration in the augmentation research contemplated. If it can, then it is not basic but it can be decomposed into an eventual set of basic capabilities.

      It would be interesting to do this exercise with the various learning outcomes one might have for a course. Which can be aided by augmentation/technological intervention? Which can't?

    2. to give direct aid to an individual in comprehending complex situations, isolating the significant factors, and solving problems

      This is where most modern technology deviates from the Engelbartian norm. Instead of broadening our horizons today's platforms often seek to constrain them because it is through constraint that control and profit can be had. Many platforms from Facebook to Learning Management Systems are more interested in locking you into their ecosystems than drinking in the wider panoply of human creativity and knowledge. The more I think about this, the more see evidence of it everywhere in our world today. In education alone, the aforementioned LMSes are being complemented by even more restrictive (and exploitative) textbook publisher "online supplements." I'm hoping both of these are the endgames of obsolete modes of thought but they have sustained themselves long after we wrote them off. I remember Bryan Alexander bemoaning this facet of the LMS as far back as 2006. That was 13 years ago - a geologic era in technology terms - and yet they are still with us.

    1. Cure of those El'ils

      A medicinal model of education. "Hi, I'm Thomas Sheridan. All these dumbasses are hopelessly lost because they don't speak correctly. They'll never do anything good, or see what good is, because bad speech runs rampant. The only hope is to heal them by teaching them to speak well. That is, like me."

    1. became acquainted with other female intellectual leaders such as Lady Mary Wortley Monlagu and Lady Catherine Jones. Astell's new friends respected her learning and intelligence and encouraged her to publish her views.

      We can see how the importance of female-only/female-dominated spaces in Astell's life played a major role in how she envisioned female learning/education could/should look like.

    2. to serve God whatever their circumstances and lo support themselves through teaching if that hecame necessary.

      Oooo this is a very clever way to educate women so that they can support themselves. To serve God -- duh. Of course.

    3. Aslell specified in lhe charter or lhe school that it should alwuys he directed by women.

      And once again, we see how the importance of female-only/female-dominated spaces/places in Astell's life influenced her beliefs on female learning/education.

    4. since the matter is of Infinite Consequence is it equitable to deny 'cm the use of any help?

      Another classic Christian move, making education of not just earthly, but eternal importance.

    5. whereby they might en­larg e their prospect, rectify their false Ideas , form in their Minds adequate conceptions of the End and Dignity of their Natures, not only have the Name and common Principles of Religion float­ing in their Heads and sometimes running out at their Mouth�, but understand the design and meaning of it, and have a just apprehension, a lively sentimenL of its Beauties and Excellencies: know wherein the Nature of a true Christian consists;

      This is a very rigid curriculum which tells us much about what Astell believes the human (or perhaps here just the woman, but I think it applies to humanity generally) to be. In particular, the wretchedness of a sinner, left unchecked, will lead to false ideas and bad beliefs and habits. "A true Christian" will need to have falsity and sin constantly called out and checked as she gradually learns to prefer what is really good, true, beautiful, etc.

    6. furthering Peter's education,

      Educating a man or a son was much more important than educating a woman or a daughter.

    7. he laller is a shame to Mankind, as being a plain sign that 'tho they discern and commend what is Good, they have not the Vcrtuc and Courage to Act accordingly

      I find this an interesting comment for Astell to make, particularly as the RT editors point out that the school Astell eventually does take over (the charity school) had "considerably more modest goals than her proposed women's college" (843). She could not put her own project into practice, though perhaps due to constraints on the situation outside of her control and not up to her own "Vertue and Courage to Act."

    8. She asserts that nature is the best teacher of clo{1uencc. Rules help only a little, and only if they have been <lcrivcd from nature.

      This has echoes of Plato in it, where Socrates asks repeatedly whether rhetoric can be taught.

    9. the heart of her educational scheme was lo be a method of thinking that could be applied in any area

      Okay, this is is more specific, similar to Wollstonecraft, as curlyQ pointed out.

      What's interesting here is Astell's saying that she isn't "exceptional"--by that she seems to mean that she is no different or more outstanding than other women, that she doesn't have some special ability or nature (just the same natural inclinations as others).

      This resonates with Wollstonecraft's Rights in her insistence that women are not by nature the 'inferior' sex but are instead bred that way due to poor education. By distancing herself from the term "exceptional", Astell seems to be doing something similar, pointing not to any particularly special nature or natural ability but instead a sound education.

    10. a serious secular education

      This call for women's education (and not just in manners and fine arts) is largely ignored for some time, despite its repetition. In the Rhetorical Tradition reading from last week, they mentioned Archbishop Fénelon published a call for women's education in 1687; here Astell says something similar (1694); others are mentioned below; Wollstonecraft is still calling for it in 1792 (100 years later).

      Fénelon's call was for basic reading and writing; Wollstonecraft's was for equality in education with boys (much like Astell's education was). The nature of Astell's school is discussed here, but what was her vision of the curriculum (the "serious secular education")?

    1. It also includes having a grasp of security basics, like protecting your online identity and avoiding online scams

      Also another thing that should be taught in k-12 schooling. I was talking to 3rd graders about their online identity and one of them said "I don't care if I act crazy in my videos that I post online". Number one, a 3rd grader should not have the ability to post videos of themselves online, in my opinion, and number two, even though they are only in 3rd grade, thses videos coud resurface one day and harm their image online.

    2. They can evaluate web content, and identify what is useful and trustworthy

      This should be taught throughout k-12 schooling. Learnng this in college was super helpful but it was taught a little late for me. I know now how to choose sources that present good information but growing up I wouldnt have been able to do that

    1. and the whole is really the flower of wisdom)

      Vico seems to be opposed, then, to highly specialized education and in favor of breadth of knowledge. This has echoes of Aristotle and Cicero.

    2. they never thought of cs• tablishing universities where young minds could be cultivated and strengthened

      Does Vico mean "university" on a large scale? Because there was clearly "conditioning of the mind" happening, in localized schools and by educators who conditioned minds on a smaller scale (go, sophists). Was that not happening in a large-scale, communal location (see def. of university, tagged)?

    3. hree stages

      These three stages are not the same as the Trivium, but they do seem to pair nicely, particularly if you understand the Trivium in a sort of developmental way as explained by Dorthy Sayers that is all the rage in classical education these days.

    1. Learning and Teaching Letter Grades are the Enemy of Authentic & Humane Learning: Bernard Bull discusses how grades work against authentic and self-determined learning. Although they are ingrained in education, he recommends considering the aspects of life free from grades and having these conversations with others. What is interesting is this is only one post being shared at the moment. Bill Ferriter shared his concerns about the association between standard grades and fixed mindset, while Will Richardson argues that grades only matter because we choose to let them matter.This continues some of the points discussed in Clive Rose’s book The End of Average and Jesse Stommell’s presentation on grades and the LMS. It is also something that Templestowe College has touched in the development of alternative pathways to higher education.

      Thanks for aggregating a variety of sources here!

      I'd recently come across Robert Talbert's post <cite>Traditional Grading: The Great Demotivator</cite> which likely fits into this same sub-topic.

    1. 011 1/w Ed11catio11 of Girls (published in 1687),

      Cf. Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Woman, written about 100 years later, making a similar argument. Specifically, Wollstonecraft argues that women are not naturally inferior or frivolous but have been bred that way through poor education. Taken in comparison to the Enlightenment's exploration of human nature and with a lack of significant progress between 1687 and 1792 (outside of literacy, noted below), it seems clear that "human nature" really means "man's nature."

  7. Jan 2019
    1. Our students have an unprecedented breadth of information resources at their fingertips, yet there is a significant danger that they will miss the opportunity to engage with those voices that hold the greatest prospects for growth. Collecting confirmations of one’s existing views is a poor substitute for meaningful learning.
    1. rote repetition and memoriza-tion, verbal analysis, and dramatic rehearsal

      This made me think...it may be a stupid question, but what does a modern education in rhetoric look like? The more I thought about it the more I found it hard to describe.

    2. persuasive explanation of what the humanities are and do

      Both this and an earlier statement about humanities needing justified (last paragraph on 116) made me think about the lack of understanding of humanities at all levels of education. This piece is specifically aimed at "the university," but even at the secondary level, humanities are the first things threatened by a budget cut. Could a lack of understanding be a main reason public schools, primarily 9-12, aren't overly worried by the idea of cutting humanities courses?

    1. When I received Chris’s comment, my first response was that I should delete my post or at least the incorrect part of it. It’s embarrassing to have your incorrect understandings available for public view. But I decided to leave the post as is but put in a disclaimer so that others would not be misled by my misunderstandings. This experience reminded me that learning makes us vulnerable. Admitting that you don’t know something is hard and being corrected is even harder. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine? Could I be more gentle? How often have I graded my students’ work and only focused on what they did wrong? Or forgotten that feeling of vulnerability when you don’t know something, when you put your work out for others to judge? This experience has also reminded me that it’s important that we as teachers regularly put ourselves into situations in which we authentically grapple with not knowing something. We should regularly share our less than fully formed understandings with others for feedback. It helps us remember that even confident learners can struggle with being vulnerable. And we need to keep in mind that many of our students are not confident learners.

      I'm reminded here of the broad idea that many bloggers write about sooner or later of their website being a "thought space" or place to contemplate out in the open. More often than not, even if they don't have an audience to interact with, their writings become a way of thinking out loud, clarifying things for themselves, self-evolving, or putting themselves out there for potential public reactions (good, bad, or indifferent).

      While writing things out loud to no audience can be helpful and useful on an individual level, it's often even more helpful to have some sort of productive and constructive feedback. While a handful of likes or positive seeming responses can be useful, I always prefer the ones that make me think more broadly, deeply, or force me to consider other pieces I hadn't envisioned before. To me this is the real value of these open and often very public thought spaces.

      For those interested in the general idea, I've been bookmarking/tagging things around the idea of thought spaces I've read on my own website. Hopefully this collection helps others better understand the spectrum of these ideas for themselves.

      With respect to the vulnerability piece, I'm reminded of an episode of <cite>The Human Current</cite> I listened to a few weeks back. There was an excellent section that touched on building up trust with students or even a class when it comes to providing feedback and criticism. Having a bank of trust makes it easier to give feedback as well as to receive it. Here's a link to the audio portion and a copy of the relevant text.

    1. It also requires students to learn solution design, meaning they have to diagnose problems, prescribe solutions, and even make those solutions with digital tools

      Learning how to deal with problems digitally can help students to learn how to work out problems in their daily lives and even other areas of technology.

    1. We believe that members of the public likely learn some inaccurate information about intelligence in their psychology courses. The good news about this implication is that reducing the public’s mistaken beliefs about intelligence will not take a massive public education campaign or public relations blitz. Instead, improving the public’s understanding about intelligence starts in psychology’s own backyard with improving the content of undergraduate courses and textbooks.

      To me, this is the "take home" message of the article. I hope psychology educators do more to improve the accuracy of their lessons about intelligence. I also hope more programs add a course on the topic to their curriculum.

  8. Dec 2018
    1. The “Big Idea” proposes to advance the educational, research and public service mission of the University of Michigan by: Offering an undergraduate experience that has real-world problem solving and engaged scholarship at its core; situating undergraduate education at the heart of the scholarly enterprise; Enhancing collaboration across disciplinary boundaries; and Amplifying the relationship of a public university to its constituencies through projects that work in collaborative partnerships with a range of communities and sectors to advance progress on significant problems; To accomplish these goals, we envision a program that is unconstrained by some of the most common operating assumptions in current higher education: grades, credit hours, and disciplinary majors.

      Very exciting!! No surprise U-Mich is doing this.

    1. In my work, I have strayed far from a background that includes a MA in English Literature and teaching K-12 students written composition. I’ve focused on teaching or analyzing written communication or networked online discourse in the higher education, especially at the graduate level, for the past 16 years or so. But this work, annotating in the open not just for an individual, the teacher who grades the assignment, hits close to my heart in teaching K-CEO learners to write for an audience.
  9. app.getpocket.com app.getpocket.com
    1. When you look at those cities, you’ll also find some of the most innovative solutions to the way we conduct commerce. Not one-hour delivery or meal kits on demand, but the boom in a parallel retail model that is decidedly social and human focused.

      Less efficiency driven and more people/human oriented

    1. Today, I had the privilege of speaking on a panel at the Comparative and International Education Society’s Annual Conference with representatives of two open education projects that depend on Creative Commons licenses to do their work. One is the OER publisher Siyavula, based in Cape Town, South Africa. Among other things, they publish textbooks for use in primary and secondary school in math and science. After high school students in the country protested about the conditions of their education – singling out textbook prices as a barrier to their learning – the South African government relied on the Creative Commons license used by Siyavula to print and distribute 10 million Siyavula textbooks to school children, some of whom had never had their own textbook before. The other are the related teacher education projects, TESSA, and TESS-India, which use the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license on teacher training materials. Created first in English, the projects and their teachers rely on the reuse rights granted by the Creative Commons license to translate and localize these training materials to make them authentic for teachers in the linguistically and culturally diverse settings of sub-Saharan Africa and India. (Both projects are linked to and supported by the Open University in the UK, http://www.open.ac.uk/, which uses Creative Commons-licensed materials as well.) If one wakes up hoping to feel that one’s work in the world is useful, then an experience like this makes it a good day.

      I think contextualizing Creative Commons material as a component in global justice and thinking of fair distribution of resources and knowledge as an antidote to imperialism is a provocative concept.This blog, infojusticeorg offers perspectives on social justice and Creative Commons by many authors.

    1. This is what higher education is currently saying to its long-term casual staff. While universities are underfunded for teaching and expected to compete globally on the basis of research, then the revenue from teaching will be diverted into research. This isn’t a blip, and there won’t be a correction. This is how universities are solving their funding problems with a solution that involves keeping labour costs (and associated overheads like paid sick leave) as low as possible. It’s a business model for bad times, and the only thing that makes it sustainable is not thinking about where the human consequences are being felt.

      This last sentence is so painful...

  10. Nov 2018
    1. Epistemic

      David Gibson: Would a fundamental confusion arise if the word ‘epistemic’ was not used as much? It seems like there is a potential to devalue the term through overuse?

      I’d like to be enlightened on this; if there is a good definition that all learning is ‘epistemic’ to the learner...then what is the alternative that would be called forth by dropping the term?

    1. it’s the whole culture.

      The question to ask here is how to set in motion this cultural shift. Titles prevent us from considering a more flexible learning credential or format.

    1. “The day is upon us where we need to strongly consider nurse practitioners and physician assistants as equal in the field,” he says. “We’re going to find a much better continuity of care for all our patients at various institutions with hospital medicine and … a nurse practitioner who is at the top of their license.”

      Hospitalists as QB should play leadership role in integrating all members of care team

    2. “Any time when nurse practitioners and other providers get together, there is always this challenge of professions,” he says. “You’re doing this or you’re doing that, and once you get people who understand what the capabilities are past the title name and what you can do, it’s just amazing.”
    1. OER matters not because textbooks matter. OER matters because it highlights an example of how something central to our public missions, the transfer of our foundational disciplinary knowledge from one generation of scholars to the next, has been co-opted by private profit. And OER is not a solution, but a systemic shift from private to public architecture in how we deliver learning.

      I love this framing of OER as public infrastructure to facilitate the transfer of knowledge. I think it is not only generational, but also more broadly to the public. OER use is not limited to just students within our institutions, but are available freely and openly more broadly to the public. To anyone. I think we need to make that point more widely known. Every OER that is made freely available is making knowledge more open to not only students in our institutions, but to anyone, anywhere. It truly is "public" infrastructure.