130 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. I have noticed that some of my friends who are Indian tend to speak English too fast and run all of the syllables together without pronouncing them properly. So every time they say something I have to ask them to repeat it. To make a good impression, speak slowly and pronounce every syllable. Practice reading out loud, concentrating on pronunciation. Make eye contact.
    2. If you got to the interview, then the company is interested in what you can do for them. They must already know you have poor English. It is probably best to lead with your best hand. There is no need to defend your poor English because it is obvious. Just talk about what you know how to do and how well you fit the job being offered.
    3. For openers, don’t say “fastly”, because there is no such word in English. Also, learn to check your typing so you don’t write “Bur” when you intended “But”. In my opinion you would make a terrible mistake by trying to defend your low skill in English. It is simply an inadequacy you have, and presumably are interested in overcoming. I think it will serve you better to memorize the following speech, and practice saying it until it flows out quickly and easily, with no hesitation or errors. Say this just as the interview begins: “I am very pleased to meet you, Mr. _______. Thank you for granting me this interview. “Before we begin, please let me apologize for my inadequate English skill. I may use some incorrect words, or pronounce some words improperly. I may not be able to answer some questions suitably, because I might lack the right words. “I hope to show you that I have the technical knowledge needed for this position, and that I have the skills and work ethic needed to do the job well. “I am currently working very hard to correct my deficiencies in English, and I believe I can accomplish that soon. I have had great success in learning other languages rapidly, but I have not yet devoted enough attention to developing fluency in English. Please understand that achieving skill in English is my highest priority.” This, I believe, will gain you a very sympathetic ear, and will lead to a very productive interview.
    1. Probably. Reading books and watching movies are fine, but they don’t do much for your active verbal expression. Each aspect of language use — receptive and expressive, reading, writing and speaking — needs to be practiced. And you aren’t getting enough practice speaking and “thinking on your feet.” Work on that and it’ll improve.
    2. Yes, it is normal. Reading English books and watching English movies are passive skills that require the person to absorb only. Your brain stores information. Also, 95% of what you absorb will be lost in time. Not very encouraging but that’s just the reality of it. In order to improve thought process and speech fluency, you have to start using the information that your brain has absorbed. One way is to write summaries and articles on books and movies you have read/seen. Another is learning to articulate your words by practising speaking before a mirror and watch how your mouth/tongue moves as you pronounce words. But the most important way to improve is human interaction. Human interaction calls for your brain to have immediate action and reaction through listening, processing, filtering and then speaking. Daily conversations is the best avenue for improvement. All the best!
    3. If you don’t have experience actually speaking English, preferably in a similar or at least similarly complex situation, and especially if you didn’t even spend quite a lot of time practicing (aloud or at least in your thoughts) what you could say in such a situation - no wonder that you weren’t able to speak very well, actually it would be quite a miracle if you had been able to! Namely, speaking is a different skill from reading and listening, and for most people much more difficult, and most people also need to practice it separately. It took me about a month of working and living nearly every awake moment in an English-speaking environment to start speaking English fluently - after I was already writing fluently, already passing for a native speaker in writing. Many people are quicker than that, but nearly everyone needs quite some practice. And even if you have generally had practice speaking English and can speak it fluently in everyday situations, it is still normal to have trouble because of being stressed out and afraid of the job interview, and/or because of the specific vocabulary it requires. In any case, doing practice job interviews with another person who can speak English, or at least with yourself, should help. This is often needed/ helpful also for job interviews in the native language.
    4. Let me ask you straight question. Did you learned any words and tried using it with someone, or at least in front of the mirror? If you’ve done this, you wouldn't be asking this. When try to speak or try to talk with someone, at first you make mistakes, and that’s very common. Do not be ashamed of who you are. I had this same problem but with Hindi. Even though I learned Hindi in school I couldn’t be fluent. At times I made blunder mistakes especially when I was in Bangalore. I still remember the incident, a guy laughed at me for uttering a word wrong. And he did correct me at the very moment, but at that time I felt very awkward. But later I got many Hindi speaking friends and I got fluent in HIndi now. Same with you amigo, if you don’t let your hands get dirt then no pay off. Try, try, try, eventually you’ll get it.51 views · View 1 upvote
    1. I’ve interviewed a lot of candidates in the past 30 years, and these cases are always the most difficult to adjudicate. On the one hand, millions of brilliant programmers don’t speak great English. On the other hand, if it take twice as long to hold every conversation, that makes for a difficult work relationship. Certainly it makes the face-to-face interview awkward depending on the relative skill level. I’ll put up a ballpark figure and say that “bad English” is a 20% handicapping factor. In other words, out of a 100 points, your grasp of English probably accounts for 20 points.
    1. There is one way coding, improve your problem solving skills by doing competitive programming and learn development in a specific language, if you have these skills , english or communication skill will be a secondary thing and you also need to improve that for which the best way is to watch english tv shows and movies. Good luck
    2. Like this, I am not sure about the HR rounds. But yes, in technical rounds when my type interviewer finds a candidate is struggling with English, answering a particular question, we say “Are you comfortable in Hindi ?!, Please go ahead in Hindi” And once you answered well. Cheers, You are selected. I am not supporting you should not improve your communication skills, you must, because that's your first impression these days. Good luck :)
    1. As a technical person writing code, all they need is the ability to understand and communicate so that work can progress without any misunderstanding. They are looking for high technical aptitude and a medium satisfactory English speaking aptitude. I have seen foreign people continuously attempt to gain English proficiency while on the job and enhance it just like any other skill. For non-technical positions,higher proficiency is required and in most cases you are required to pass IELTS academic. HTH
    2. The US isn’t particularly tolerant of workers who cannot communicate in English. If you want to be on good projects and you want to be promoted, you need at least good conversational english, with accent minimal enough to be understood, plus a complete grasp of technical english for your profession.
    1. The English language has evolved in too many ways to just settle down with one variant or dialect. You must have a thorough knowledge of all variants of the English languageYou must not depend on Spell Check to conform to UK English or US English or AU EnglishGrammar must be impeccable. Surprisingly Americans enjoy the British accent and dialect; and some may choose to use that as a "brand identity" - you need to be aware of the nuancesSoftware companies often don't care about this; but their clients do. Which means it may not appear in a job interview but when you speak with your clients having a good handle on the preferred variant would be a huge bonus. And a reason for that client to specifically ask for YOU to be their support person / service manager. In my work with clients in India and abroad, I've generally found they they understand the Indian accent fairly well - as long as the words and phrases used are suitable to the region. If you use a heavy Texan accent while talking to someone native to Norway, chances are they won't understand you too well. Sometimes, albeit rarely, you need a translator. Yes English to English translation is a possibility wherein complex words and phrases native to one culture need to be put in context while talking to a different culture. In fewer words: Learn Everything. Keep Learning.
    1. Yes. If your English isn't good you may have trouble understanding and may have trouble being understood. That's bound to make things difficult. However, if it's good enough, you don't have to worry about it. The interviewer will do their best to communicate, and they are unlikely to be biased against non-native speakers, because probably most people at Google aren't.
    1. It is not mandatory to be fluent in English but it is necessary that you learn enough English to communicate your thoughts and opinions and understands others. English is a universal language and so it is important to know basic level English in order to work for multi-national companies like Google.
    1. Every answer to every single doubt in your life solely depends on what you want to do and where you want to reach. If you want to be a content reviewer, knowing English-movie level English is more than enough. If you want to be a person who documents stuff, its always better if you are spot on in your written English. If you want to be somebody who wants to travel to different countries and communicate with different people, well you definitely should be a man with words. And if you end up to be somebody like me, a Software Developer, the only English that you'll be expected to speak is the extent of the Programming Language. It might seem as a done and dusted script, but in the long run, only hard work pays off and shows the character you're made of.Depends what you are working hard on and for.If you know that the only goal for you is to see the view from a mountain top and wave to a friend, be wise and finish it in the daylight. Cheers!
    1. Sure. A lot of people with limited knowledge or even no knowledge of English work here. You can certainly find a job but it may not be what you want to do. Best option is to work for a person from your own country who is fluent in English and has his or her own business where most of the customers are also from your own country. He or she may own a retail store, gas station (petrol station), hair or beauty salon, landscaping or construction company, restaurant, etc. You will need to communicate with your owner to do most or all of your work and most of the customers or clients will also be from your own country. While working in such an environment you can also work on learning English. There are many resources available in US for speakers of other languages who want to learn English1.1K views · View 2 upvotes
    1. If you are able to put your ideas and thoughts in an understandable way for another person to get what you want to convey. Take it simply like you talk in your native language saying what you want to say. Try being yourself and speak without keeping in mind what you think about your communication skills. And this is something definitely you can work on to get better at it. Youtube has lots of resources to help you improve with your communication skills. And with regular trails, people get better at it.
    2. Yes. You will get a job. There are many jobs that do not require excellent communication skills in English. If you can communicate with clarity, listen carefully to what others have to say, you have qualified for the job. You must be fluent in the local languages that also helps you in the job. Besides, learning English is not difficult at all. By practice, you can master this language and the best way is to keep talking and listening. When someone corrects you, thank them and move on and not get bogged down by criticism.
    3. Jens Hartmann, Head of Learning & Development at Barrett Consulting Group (2012-present)Answered February 9, 2017Originally Answered: Is it possible find work, if I don't speak English very well?When I have interviews with people I always look for their willingness to learn. If they didn’t even bother to learn the language used in my company, I’d be worried how well they would learn the other stuff they needed to know to work here. It doesn’t matter if your English isn’t very good yet, if you showed that you are working on it and are eager to get better then I would be happy with that.
    4. Knowing fluent English is not a prerequisite to get a job. However, it depends on the type of job and your own personal ambitions. If you are seeking a job where knowledge of English is a essential or you aspire for growth in your job, then perhaps it is possible that poor communication skills in English could hamper your selection/ progress. The fact that you have drafted your question in Quora without any mistake, suggests to me that your competence in English, is fairly good ( especially when I see a large number of very poorly drafted questions being asked on Quora). Hence all you need to do is keep working on enhancing your competence in English and use it to grow personally and professionally.
    1. poor English speaking will worsen your opportunities in any country to get a software job…. forget about job in US which is their native language and more over its the universal language too.. so I feel it is must ,at least an IELTS band of 6.5 will be good enough
    1. Yes you can get software job without fluency in English. Software industry requires only technical skills but you must be good in that skills. The requirement of good English skill comes after you reach certain level/position. I.e. If you become a project manager you would have to communicate among different departments and customers. So for better understanding of project you must attain good communication skills. I am not focusing on English skills only. You must be a good communicator in your native language also. I have seen people getting stuck on a developer position even after a good set of technical skills and experience. It is necessary when you are looking for jobs in a state other than your native language. There you must have a good English skills to communicate among your colleagues.
    1. However, for getting hired as a software developer, it really doesn’t matter about how much English you know. Software companies look for candidates who have the knowledge and got a fine way of representing it. May be that’s what you should focus on. It’s about standing in a market and selling yourself. And that needs you to know the domain specific English, mostly the technical jargon stitched by few simple words of English.
    1. Well the question is structured very well, so I don't think you have a poor English. Have faith in yourself buddy. Don't get disheartened that you have a weak grip on English. 1.) Be confident. Confidence alone can do wonders. Tell yourself standing infront of the mirror, that you're going to make it and no force in the world, can stop you. 2.) Use simple sentences. Don't rush, take you time. 3.) And if you fail, then it's fine. It's not true that we will win everytime. Sometimes we do fail. But never give up. Work on yourself and surley you will make it.
    2. You can face it (job interview, life quandry, challenge, fear, anxiety, stress, etc.) with bravery, courage, kindness, patience, forgiveness, gratitude, knowledge/wisdom (you know that you'll do the best you can with what you have/know), and the ability to laugh at yourself. (:
    3. First of all, I'm not going to sugarcoat saying, tackling interviews is easy with bad English. No, they are not. But, on the bright side, interviews are more about what else you do apart from speak well. So, concentrate on that part. Learn the basic grammar. Keep your sentences short, crisp and relevant.Don't let the hesitation or the feeling that you are bad at something, cloud your clarity about things you clearly know. This in my opinion should be sufficient to face any interview.
    4. The one thing I am not sure about is, the eligibility criteria for the interview that the you are going for. If Spoken English is one of their major assessment criteria, I think you shouldn’t go unprepared. Start planning and preparing for the interview if you still have time. You could try these:Do mock interviewsPrepare good answers for most frequently asked questionsTry to exhibit confidence in your voice and body languageBe sincere in your answersRead about the company in detailHope it’s of use!
    5. First of all, I'm so happy that you've accepted your limitation and you want to make an attempt to overcome it. The only way you can get better at English is by using it as frequently as possible. So, start conversing with people in English. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. Everyone does. Just don't give up. People will laugh and try to pull you down, yes! Ignore those bastards! Interviewers are nothing but people. And they make grammar mistakes too. And more than your language, it's the skill you possess that matters. So, go out. Stay positive. Talk to whoever you meet. Do not be afraid to learn! We're not perfect either. Cheers to your spirit,love! :)
    6. I once had to hire a software engineer. The job required some knowledge of classical physics. In the end the choice was down to two applicants. Both were Vietnamese immigrants. One spoke English very well and already had the necessary knowledge. The other knew no physics at all, and struggled with English. I hired the latter applicant because, despite his weakness in the language, he was open and easy to talk with. The other was more reserved. I felt that I could easily teach the latter the physics he would need, and that he would be motivated to follow directions. He worked out very well. I wrote all the physics he would need to know on seven pages. He successfully worked from that. By the time I left that company he was ready to fill my shoes as the new software director.
    7. Does’t matter. Face it and experience it. There is nothing for you to lose but gain. Once you are rejected, you will have following things for next one. a) What basic questions Interviewer does ask ? Prepare them for next one. b) Confidence . it will help you in next one. PS:- Learn grammar. Improve listening skill, Start writing about your daily activity, at last but not least- “start speaking” . PPS:- Watch Hollywood movies with subtitles and repeat the dialogue .
    8. You have rated yourself as “really bad” in speaking English. What efforts have you taken to improve? I’m sure you must have made some efforts and you feel that it’s not good enough compared to those who have studied in English medium schools . If what you say is understood by others, you are doing fine. Now coming to impress the IO. At SSBs the IO is evaluating your personality qualities from what you answer to his questions. For example, if you are asked to narrate your daily routine, you must arrange your thoughts sequentially, narrating essentials events of your day and how you manage your time, how you take responsibilities, how you interact with others in the day etc etc. Please be reminded that spoken English, pronunciation etc. improves with time and interaction with others in company. In my case, although I am from an English medium school, my spoken English was far from the English spoken by other cadets in my course. However, with passage of time and my eagerness to improve, I was as fluent as others. You will find the other candidates who come for ssb are as good/bad as you are. My sincere advice is not to have any complex about spoken English. There are many other things to emphasize on. Now, some tips for you to improve are:Try speaking to your family members and friends in English only.Listen to English news on TV . Admire and try to emulate the anchor.Pick up topics and speak on them to your family members or friends and if there’s no audience, speak to the mirror. Record your speech in your cell phone and notice the areas that could be improved. I am sure, your speech on the 7th day would be much much better than the one recorded on the first day.Finally, have the confidence that you are the best learner and can do it.Best wishes.
    9. Whenever you are about to face an interview, the most important thing is to be confident, how you are presenting matters the most and whether you know or don't know any answer try not to get nervous .When it comes to english, try to use simple present tense and past tense while framing sentences. Always try to keep them simple and understandable. While facing any interview, there will be a set of common questions asked for all except your field knowledge. Before attending any interview, find out those questions, make a list of them and start practicing them in home.Afterall, practice makes a man perfect. So even if you are not fluent still you can easily crack any interview. Keep trying and giving interview, even if you don't get selected, you will gain experience which will be helpful while giving next inteeerview. In the end I would say just FACE IT ALL. YOU will crack it easily.
    1. The idea behind the reference interview is for the librarian to respond to questions by asking questions in order to supply the best possible resource. Frequently, this is really useful because people will ask for the kind of information they think the librarian can find, rather than what they actually want.

      This is closely related to solving a particular well-defined problem rather than solving a more general problem.

  2. Jun 2021
    1. Angular is nothing but an open-source web application framework. It is being led by the Angular Team at Google and also by a community of individuals and corporations. It is based on TypeScript.Angular is a complete rewrite from the same team that had built AngularJS. It can be used as the frontend of the MEAN stack, which consists of the MongoDB database, Express.js web application server framework, Angular itself (or AngularJS), and the Node.js server runtime environment.

      Top Angular 8 Interview Questions to get you ready

  3. May 2021
    1. Adam Kucharski. (2021, February 6). It’s flattering being asked for your opinion by the media (especially if you have lots of them) but I do think it’s important to defer to others if you’re being asked on as a ‘scientific expert’ and the subject of the interview falls outside your area of research/expertise. [Tweet]. @AdamJKucharski. https://twitter.com/AdamJKucharski/status/1358050473098571776

    1. Lizzie O’Leary. (2021, February 2). I have done a lot of interviews about covid in the past year. And one thing that really stays with me is something @nataliexdean said. That the public is used to hearing from scientists at the end of the process. And right now, we are in the middle. [Tweet]. @lizzieohreally. https://twitter.com/lizzieohreally/status/1356410686319026176

  4. Apr 2021
  5. Mar 2021
  6. Feb 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci. “Launching a New SciBeh Tool- the Video-Viewer: Https://T.Co/LhfABNTBJM Over the Pandemic, @SciBeh Has Suggested Many a Great Webinar, Video, Lecture or Interview. but on Twitter Material Is Gone in a Flash. So We’ve Collected It in One Place, to Search, and View. Enjoy!” Tweet. @SciBeh (blog), February 8, 2021. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1358798007341363203.

  7. Dec 2020
    1. How to Hire an In-house Python & Django Developer: Python/Django Interview Questions, Tips, and Advice

      The questions you ask during a Python and Django interview are important, since the right Django interview questions can help you define whether an applicant is the right fit for your company. In this article, we talk about the most crucial stage in the hiring process — the in-person interview — outline Python and Django interview questions, and conclude with dos and don’ts

    1. Bandcamp’s CEO and founders’ public attaché Ethan Diamond is as good as they come

      Important!

      I've just come across a recent interview with Ethan Diamond in which so many of the questions which prompted me to write this essay are addressed. (The link includes my annotations.)

  8. Nov 2020
    1. What is the STAR interview method?The STAR interview method is a technique you can use to prepare for behavioral and situational interview questions. STAR stands for: situation, task, action and result.This method will help you prepare clear and concise responses using real-life examples.Hiring managers ask behavioral interview questions to determine whether you are the right fit for a job. By using the STAR strategy, you can make sure you’re fully addressing the interviewer’s question while also demonstrating how you were able to overcome previous challenges and be successful.

      The [[STAR method]] can help people prepare for [[behavioural interview]] questions

    1. In-depth questionsThe following interview questions enable the hiring manager to gain a comprehensive understanding of your competencies and assess how you would respond to issues that may arise at work:What are the most important skills for a data engineer to have?What data engineering platforms and software are you familiar with?Which computer languages can you use fluently?Do you tend to focus on pipelines, databases or both?How do you create reliable data pipelines?Tell us about a distributed system you've built. How did you engineer it?Tell us about a time you found a new use case for an existing database. How did your discovery impact the company positively?Do you have any experience with data modeling?What common data engineering maxim do you disagree with?Do you have a data engineering philosophy?What is a data-first mindset?How do you handle conflict with coworkers? Can you give us an example?Can you recall a time when you disagreed with your supervisor? How did you handle it?

      deeper dive into [[Data Engineer]] [[Interview Questions]]

  9. Oct 2020
  10. Sep 2020
    1. Nailing the interview takes an in-depth preparation and a huge amount of practice. We have compiled for you the most frequently asked 50 top tableau interview questions based on the difficulty level.

  11. Aug 2020
  12. Jul 2020
    1. Helping Business Hire the Best Employees | Yunic HR SolutionsBy SIM Team - 2020-07-110 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Yunic HR Solutions is an enlistment or arrangement organization based out of New Delhi, India. It was founded in 2018. We have a strong database of candidates from regions like – IT/Education/Sales/Accounts/Finance/Marketing to customers across India. The practiced scouts convey their knowledge and experience to fulfill the opening shared. Yunic HR Solutions find a congeniality between meeting the activity’s necessities and improving your affiliations ethos with a little assistance from our industry qualified enlistment stars.VisionWe are an expert, eager and imaginative group, committed to giving proficient HR Consulting Services and developing Recruitment Solutions that help our clients become increasingly gainful and beneficial.MissionOur Mission to grow long haul and vital associations with our customers, and help them to change the present difficulties into tomorrow’s victories. Also, we are focused on meeting and surpassing the desires in offering superb assistance, unforeseen quality and exceptional incentive to our kin, customers and accomplicesArea of ProficiencyOur specialization is in household enrollment – PAN India. Ourcenter is to asset experts who meet the necessity according to the set of working responsibilities shared as well as check if  the up-and-comer will fit the organization work culture too.Passion of ExcellenceWe grasp and maintain the best expectations of individual and expert morals, genuineness and trust.We are dependable to satisfy our responsibilities to our customers, accomplices and every one of our partners with an away from of the directness and responsibility inalienable in those commitments.We are focused on conveying unrivalled services with honesty, trust and thankfulness to keep up our client dedication. We guarantee that we will convey uncommon business results while making a positive commitment to our customer’s organization.We treat everybody with solid regard, class and decency. Furthermore, we generally welcome assorted variety and contrasts of supposition.YouTube link- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELkFJ3HokpYWebsite: Yunic SolutionsFacebook: Yunic Solutions FacebookInstagram: Yunic Solutions InstagramLinkedin: Yunic Solutions Linkedin

      Yunic HR Solutions is an enlistment or arrangement organization based out of New Delhi, India. It was founded in 2018. We have a strong database of candidates from regions like – IT/Education/Sales/Accounts/Finance/Marketing to customers across India.

  13. Jun 2020
  14. May 2020
  15. Apr 2020
  16. Feb 2020
  17. Sep 2019
    1. This is definitely from an incel's perspective, and I also realize it's also the ultimate neo-liberal love song, as we sit in a place of peak individualism. It's not the kind of message I'm proud to spread. I don't intend it to be a love song to the self — it's more of an 'I'm stuck with myself' song. If no one wants to fuck you, it's your fault.

      I still miss David Berman so very, very much, and I know I will continue to miss him for as long as I live.

  18. Apr 2019
    1. Meaning of life?Love and meaningful work.What makes work meaningful?When you apply your unique abilities to something you regard as worthwhile – especially if you know that no one else would have done it in quite the same way.Wait. Can I have 40 more years to work on my answer?
    2. What do you do in your spare time?Hang out with family, walk and hike, play piano, read speculative fiction and popular non-fiction (esp. history, psychology, technology, and cosmology).
  19. Mar 2019
    1. L.A. has this amazing Koreatown and the most Korean Americans anywhere in the states. At the same time, the industry that you wanted to break into when you arrived is extremely white. What were your impressions of L.A. when you first got here, and has your relationship to the city changed in any significant way? Koreatown at first became a safe haven for me where you can go to not feel othered. I wasn’t cognizant of [being othered then]. I was aware of me being an Asian actor, but I was not thinking about anything but just working within the system, whatever that meant. I wouldn’t take roles that would be bad as an Asian person, but I was looking to just get work. So you do that on the daily and then you come back, and for some reason you always just keep gravitating toward K-Town. It’s comfortable. Then you start to let it go for a bit. Because you go, “Oh, I don’t need the security blanket of this place.” And then you find it again, where now you’re approaching K-Town not from a place of fear. Rather, now you’re just going there to go eat some bomb food and celebrate your culture. That’s the confidence that you build over time, or you hope to.
    2. What do you feel like that gaze wants you to do? I won’t speak for other Asian American actors, because I don’t know what they’re being offered. But for me, it’s like: nice guy, dependable, supportive, benign. Beige. And as a Korean man, I am not beige. And I felt that when I was over there [shooting Burning].
    3. Do you think of yourself as a heartthrob? Ay-yi-yi. I’m at this interesting point of not rejecting it, because I want to be representative of the idea that anyone can be that and feel that. For that reason, I don’t want to reject it. But definitely I want to reject it. Why? Self-hatred. Maybe when I was young, I wanted that. I was like, “Why not me, why can’t an Asian man be this?” Then you try to find that through systems that aren’t native to you. You’re like, “I know what it means to be hot. It means you work out. It means you drink a ton of milk, so you get huge. It means you’re mean to people. Toxic masculinity.” Then you realize it’s so stupid. Just be comfortable with yourself.
    4. You’ve worked with heavyweights in the Korean film world: Joon-ho Bong on Okja and Chang-dong Lee on Burning. They’ve given you meaty roles, as well as the opportunity to work with art-house auteurs. What do you make of the fact that these opportunities seem to be primarily coming from the Korean side, rather than the American side?  Sometimes it’s tough. I’ll come back from Burning, and I’ll be like, “Will I ever get this experience again? Will I ever feel this free in a character? Will I ever feel like they’re looking to get my best performance? Down to the lighting, the makeup, the boundarylessness that they project on me?” I feel like there’s a mold here in America, that even in my daily walking around I feel subjected to. Someone’s projecting, like, “This is how you’re supposed to fit in this world.” It’s this generic Asian man mold that pervades.
    5. I like to joke that Korean cinema, which is known in part for its intensity of emotion, is 5,000 years of suffering condensed into an art form. Yeah, that’s real.
    6. Yesterday, when you were introducing the movie [at a screening], you called Chang-dong Lee a “film genius.” What draws you to him? He reached out to me through his films first, obviously. Peppermint Candy helped me understand why I have this han [an untranslatable strain of sorrow that makes up a pillar of Korean national identity] in my body that I can’t explain. I couldn’t explain how me being a 5-year-old immigrant in America was filled with so much rage. It wasn’t just the fear of my environment, or being an Asian kid in America. That probably stoked it a little bit, but I didn’t experience war, I didn’t experience trauma. You don’t know where it comes from, but then you watch [the movie] and you go, “Oh my God, there’s a whole level of Korean experience that I’m missing out on.” There was this deeper level that I couldn’t access, and that film helped me get there.
    7. Are you disappointed that American or international audiences won’t get all of the nuances in the dialogue? No, because we’re talking about one layer of this story, and really the human layer is the thing that binds it all together. Do you mean the romantic triangle in the film? I mean the feeling of unrequited loneliness. The feeling that we’re all alone. We can try to put labels on ourselves and try to separate each other, but really, we’re all fucking alone and that’s what it is. And it’s scary, and it sounds terrible, but really, it’s OK.
    1. The whole movie is about the tension between three people, just like a ghost story at certain points. And in the middle, there’s this chilly sequence where they just hang out during the magic hour. How did you approach the structure of the film and how did you shoot this particular sequence? _________________   After the dance scene, something had to change. That’s what I felt, and the audience can feel that we’re heading to another road as well. The scene itself is in the middle, storyline-wise, and also it’s a quarter of the film. A lot of people think of it as a thriller that it’s mostly about finding Hae-mi’s whereabouts, but we’re not doing that: we’re doing something that’s more about what she was looking for and who she really is. We wanted to shoot the dancing scene after sunset, and so that we could emphasize the boundaries between darkness and lightning, as well as the mixture of reality and surrealistic reality. And when you look at the set, you can see the Korean flag which reflects Korean politics, you can see a dirt, the grass and nature elements, where on the other side you can even see cars passing by. So it’s a mixture of all kinds of life around us, in the scene, and in here Hae-mi is looking for the meaning of life. She is dancing with great hunger. We tried to film that scene without any artificial light. Also, I wanted that scene to show the freedom which she’s getting through and the spontaneity she’s also getting through. That’s the most important thing I wanted to capture in the scene.
  20. Jan 2019
  21. Dec 2018
    1. SIGGRAPH: Share your top three technology tools. CC: I hate technology! But if you’re trying to make something pretty in this medium, there’s no avoiding it
    2. SIGGRAPH: What is the best advice you would give someone starting out in animation? CC: Draw. Carry a sketchbook (or a tablet) and draw (or paint!) every chance you get. Make observations from the world around you, from photo or video reference, from artists you admire. Most importantly, don’t just observe, but put those observations down on paper in visual form. Make a habit of it. The things you learn that way will stay with you forever. And that knowledge will be useful no matter what medium you end up working in.
    1. A: Anything else you’d like to say or tell the new comers and/or the community? L: Mmh, I know how it feels to be limited by your own lack of skills and today’s tools are taking away a little bit of that barrier. And the more the software helps you to get rid of the technical problems of representation, the more creative you can be. While the tool is the same, it’s very fun to see that everybody has its own take to how to use Quill. It wasn’t at first, but now I see more and more people having their own style. It’s so refreshing. I follow the group and what is going on with a lot of attention.
    2. A: Hello Lip, please tell us a bit more about you. What is your background? Did you study visual arts?   L: Not really [laughs]. My parents forced me to have a very classical education. I studied Latin and ancient Greek in high school. But when I was 18, I realized that I enjoy to visualize my ideas and thoughts. So I went to the University and studied advertising. I was heading toward more of a copywriting agency type of occupation until I felt the need to carry my ideas until completion. I was tired of giving them away too soon because I found my stories never really turned out the way they should be. Since the softwares got easier and more accessible, I managed to find the right moment to jump in and learn the technical skills to do it on my own.
    1. Where did you study and what were some of your first jobs? I actually have a degree in Economics from Colorado College. This was pursued at the behest of my father and after bartending for a year in London after I graduated, I went to the Vancouver Film School and took their course in Multimedia. My first jobs were all menial labor: I worked sorting packages at a Greyhound station, cleaning recycled bottles at a brewery and erected party tents. After VFS, I moved to New York and freelanced as a web designer/flash animator for a bit before I helped found heavy.com with two of the guys I had been freelancing for. That lasted for about five years before I started Buck with my partners in 2003.