369 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2020
    1. This mirrors how classes already work and avoids the issues with introducing an unexpected DOM node.
  2. Oct 2020
    1. I debugged docker-compose and docker-py and figured out that you should either use environment variables or options in command. You should not mix these . If you even specify --tls in command then you will have to specify all the options as the TLSConfig object, as now TLSConfig object is created completely from the command options and operide the TFSConfig object created from the environment variable.
    1. docker --tlsverify ps executes just fine, while docker-compose --tlsverify up -d --force-recreate gives me an error: SSL error: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed
    2. I only have one set of certs. And I can't see how they can be different because docker commands work using the endpoint. It's just the docker-compose command that fails
    3. docker-compose command you can not mix environment variable and command option. You can specify setting in env variable and then just use docker-compose ps. The connection will be secured with TLS protocol if DOCKER_TLS_VERIFY variable is set.
    4. You dont need to pass --tls or --tlsverify option in the docker-config path as the task already sets DOCKER_TSL_VERIFY environment varaible. I debugged docker-compose and docker-py library and verified that if you pass any flag --tls or --tlsverify flag it tries to create tslConfig object out of options and not from environment
    1. I debugged docker-compose and docker-py and figured out that you should either use environment variables or options in command. You should not mix these . If you even specify --tls in command then you will have to specify all the options as the TLSConfig object, as now TLSConfig object is created completely from the command options and operide the TFSConfig object created from the environment variable.
    1. My version of https://svelte.dev/repl/9c7d12357a15457bb914705702f156d1?version=3.19.2 from https://github.com/sveltejs/svelte/issues/4586

      to try to simplify and help me understand it better.

      So the lack of synchronousness is only noticed inside handleClick.

      By the time the DOM gets updated, it has a consistent/correct state.

      In other words, the console.log shows wrong value, but template shows correct value. So this might not be an actual problem for many/most use cases.

    1. I too have been confused by behavior like this. Perhaps a clearly defined way to isolate atomic units with synchronous reactivity would help those of us still working through the idiosyncrasies of reactivity.
    2. For performance reasons, $: reactive blocks are batched up and run in the next microtask. This is the expected behavior. This is one of the things that we should talk about when we figure out how and where we want to have a section in the docs that goes into more details about reactivity. If you want something that updates synchronously and depends on another value, you can use a derived store:
    1. One would expect the display to be updated, but it is not... WHY is it updated the 2nd time you enter something? What is different?
    1. vague

      The word 'vague' seems to repeat quite a lot in descriptions of Constantia's gestures and behaviors. She reminds me of Laura from the Garden Party, having her own inner world nobody knows of. But she's more reserved and reticent, which might stem from her insecurity and dependence on her older sister's views.

    1. Landi, F., Marzetti, E., Sanguinetti, M., Ciciarello, F., Tritto, M., Benvenuto, F., Bramato, G., Brandi, V., Carfì, A., D’Angelo, E., Fusco, D., Lo Monaco, M. R., Martone, A. M., Pagano, F., Rocchi, S., Rota, E., Russo, A., Salerno, A., Cattani, P., … Bernabei, on behalf of the G. A. C.-19 G. T. (n.d.). Should face masks be worn to contain the spread of COVID-19 in the postlockdown phase? Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/traa085

    1. If the user now clicks Back again, the URL bar will display https://www.mozilla.org/foo.html, and totally bypass bar.html.
    1. I never noticed her.

      Well, at least he's honest about that. it's incredible to me how self-centered Mr. Franklin could be. Up to that point, he barely even recognizes the excruciating pain she must've endured, being treated as non-existent by him; he doesn't exhibit any empathy or sympathy (which is hilarious given that he's chasing Rachel so desperately), as if it is so inexplicable and absurd that she's had feelings for a person so above her societal rank, that it can simply be disregarded. Notice how the entire time he's reading the letter, all he cares about is finding a clue for the Moonstone, or his own ostensible guilt.

      However, he's surely endeavoring to justify himself here, not to be seen to the reader as a supercilious, ill-mannered man!

  3. Sep 2020
    1. I sowed the good seed, in spite of him, by throwing a second tract in at the window of the cab.

      It's just mind-blowing how satisfied she gets from distributing her tracts among random people who could not be clearer about their reluctance to receive them. Clack, much like Betteredge, assumes she knows the depths of people and is so judgmental of the unconventional (e.g., Rachel) but completely fails to recognize that her own behavior is far from being desired, and is, to all eyes, the unconventional and deplorable one.

      I wonder if this is Collins' way to humorously ridicule this phenomenon. More broadly, I wonder if Collins' use of extreme and blatantly hypocritical narrators who inspire hatred (e.g., Clack and Betteredge), is his calling for moderation in society.

    1. Basically, the idea is that a train tried to start with the caboose brakes stuck on. After releasing the caboose, the train still could not start. The problem was that when the train attempted to start with the caboose brake on, it stretched all the inter-car couplings so that the whole train was just like one big car. At this point, the friction from the engine train wheels was not enough to get the whole thing going. Instead, you need to just get one car moving at a time - this is why there is space between the couplings.
    1. Most simple example: <script> import ChildComponent from './Child.svelte'; </script> <style> .class-to-add { background-color: tomato; } </style> <ChildComponent class="class-to-add" /> ...compiles to CSS without the class-to-add declaration, as svelte currently does not recognize the class name as being used. I'd expect class-to-add is bundled with all nested style declarations class-to-add is passed to ChildComponent as class-to-add svelte-HASH This looks like a bug / missing feature to me.
    1. Svelte will not offer a generic way to support style customizing via contextual class overrides (as we'd do it in plain HTML). Instead we'll invent something new that is entirely different. If a child component is provided and does not anticipate some contextual usage scenario (style wise) you'd need to copy it or hack around that via :global hacks.
    1. It's fashionable to dislike CSS. There are lots of reasons why that's the case, but it boils down to this: CSS is unpredictable. If you've never had the experience of tweaking a style rule and accidentally breaking some layout that you thought was completely unrelated — usually when you're trying to ship — then you're either new at this or you're a much better programmer than the rest of us.
    1. Stuaert Rtchie [@StuartJRitchie] (2020) This encapsulates the problem nicely. Sure, there’s a paper. But actually read it & what do you find? p-values mostly juuuust under .05 (a red flag) and a sample size that’s FAR less than “25m”. If you think this is in any way compelling evidence, you’ve totally been sold a pup. Twitter. Retrieved from:https://twitter.com/StuartJRitchie/status/1305963050302877697

    1. Over time we tend to develop confirmation bias, forever seeking evidence that reinforces what we already believe, and downplaying or dismissing what doesn’t. We’re also designed, both genetically and instinctively, to put our own safety first, and to avoid taking too much risk. Rather than using our capacity for critical thinking to assess new possibilities, we often co-opt our prefrontal cortex to rationalize choices that were actually driven by our emotions.
  4. Aug 2020
    1. Barrios, J. M., & Hochberg, Y. (2020). Risk Perception Through the Lens of Politics in the Time of the COVID-19 Pandemic (Working Paper No. 27008; Working Paper Series). National Bureau of Economic Research. https://doi.org/10.3386/w27008