319 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Carlos del Rio. (2021, June 7). Here’s Where That COVID-19 Vaccine Infertility Myth Came From—And Why It Is Not True https://t.co/DvBYcCsEJx The evidence firmly shows that the COVID-19 vaccines don’t cause infertility. [Tweet]. @CarlosdelRio7. https://twitter.com/CarlosdelRio7/status/1401928031787225091

  2. Jun 2021
    1. Process based parallelisation is simpler than thread based due to well, the GIL on MRI rubies and lack of 100% thread safety within the other gems. (I'm fairly certain for example that there are threaded bugs lurking within the mocks code).
  3. May 2021
    1. Gobeil, P., Pillet, S., Séguin, A., Boulay, I., Mahmood, A., Vinh, D. C., Charland, N., Boutet, P., Roman, F., Most, R. V. D., Perez, M. de los A. C., Ward, B. J., & Landry, N. (2021). Interim Report of a Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Plant-Produced Virus-Like Particle Vaccine for Covid-19 in Healthy Adults Aged 18-64 and Older Adults Aged 65 and Older. MedRxiv, 2021.05.14.21257248. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.05.14.21257248

    1. but there was no difference in levels of withdrawal between those on NRT patches and those on placebo.

      Data like this seems to be definitive proof that nicotine is nothing like tobacco. I'm not aware of any evidence that nicotine itself is addictive, save for a few anecdotes. I don't put much stock in these anecdotes because people also report habit-withdrawal symptoms when they quit zero nicotine e-juice. That is to say, without placebo controls we cannot conclude drug withdrawal is the cause because it can also be explained by psychology.

      That said, I'm reasonably certain that nicotine contributes to tobacco addiction. While I think nicotine is fairly non-addictive, I believe it enhances the addictiveness of other drugs. I think this is partly due to an entourage effect that alters the high, and also a memory-enhancing effect so one remembers the high more vividly.

    1. The foremost consideration with respect to teaching of the Australian Aboriginal memory technique is the cultural safety aspect and respect for the peoples who developed this approach. In our program, the teaching of this program was administered by an experienced Australian Aboriginal Educator, who was able to integrate the method into our teaching program, while simultaneously preventing several breaches of cultural etiquette and terminology which could easily have compromised the material had it been delivered by a non-Australian Aboriginal educator (TY), however well-intentioned. The need for a deep knowledge and understanding of the appropriate context for teaching and delivery of this material is probably the main factor which would preclude more widespread adoption of this technique.

      I really appreciate the respect given to indigenous knowledge here.

      The researchers could have gone much further in depth in describing it and the aspects of what they mean by cultural "safety". They've done a disservice here by downplaying widespread adoption. Why not? Why couldn't we accord the proper respect of traditions to actively help make these techniques more widespread? Shouldn't we be willing to do the actual work to accord respect and passing on of these knowledges?

      Given my reading in the area, there seems to be an inordinate amount of (Western) "mysticism" attributed to these techniques (here and in the broader anthropology literature) rather than approaching them head-on from a more indigenous perspective. Naturally the difficult part is being trusted enough by tribal elders to be taught these methods to be able to pass them on. (Link this idea to Tim Ingold's first chapter of Anthropology: Why It Matters.)

      All this being said, the general methods known from the West, could still be modified to facilitate in widespread adoption of those techniques we do know. Further work and refinement of them could continue apace while still maintaining the proper respect of other cultures and methods, which should be the modern culture default.

      If nothing else, the West could at least roll back the educational reforms which erased their own heritage to regain those pieces. The West showing a bit of respect for itself certainly wouldn't be out of line either.

  4. Apr 2021
  5. Mar 2021
    1. Yufika, A., Wagner, A. L., Nawawi, Y., Wahyuniati, N., Anwar, S., Yusri, F., Haryanti, N., Wijayanti, N. P., Rizal, R., Fitriani, D., Maulida, N. F., Syahriza, M., Ikram, I., Fandoko, T. P., Syahadah, M., Asrizal, F. W., Aletta, A., Haryanto, S., Jamil, K. F., … Harapan, H. (2020). Parents’ hesitancy towards vaccination in Indonesia: A cross-sectional study in Indonesia. Vaccine, 38(11), 2592–2599. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.01.072

  6. Feb 2021
    1. Youyang Gu. (2021, February 24). When can we return to normal? Forget about ‘herd immunity’. Below is my estimate for the number of susceptible individuals over time, as a proportion of the US population. Looking at this graph, what is the best point to go back to normal? Christmas? Fall? Or Summer? 🧵 https://t.co/V4uiFk5YcP [Tweet]. @youyanggu. https://twitter.com/youyanggu/status/1364627872233750543

    1. You can use container values, that wraps actual success or error value into a thin wrapper with utility methods to work with this value. That’s exactly why we have created @dry-python/returns project. So you can make your functions return something meaningful, typed, and safe.
    2. So, despite your code is type safe it is not safe to be used.
    1. For now I've worked around this by putting all the key-value pairs into an array before passing them into the interaction, then re-building the hash inside the interaction. It works, but it requires some extra code
    2. You can use it by allowing a hash with arbitrary keys, but that loses type-safety one that object.
  7. Jan 2021
    1. Sadoff, J., Le Gars, M., Shukarev, G., Heerwegh, D., Truyers, C., de Groot, A. M., Stoop, J., Tete, S., Van Damme, W., Leroux-Roels, I., Berghmans, P.-J., Kimmel, M., Van Damme, P., de Hoon, J., Smith, W., Stephenson, K. E., De Rosa, S. C., Cohen, K. W., McElrath, M. J., … Schuitemaker, H. (2021). Interim Results of a Phase 1–2a Trial of Ad26.COV2.S Covid-19 Vaccine. New England Journal of Medicine, 0(0), null. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2034201

  8. Dec 2020
    1. Thus, just as humans built buildings and bridges before there was civil engineering, humans are proceeding with the building of societal-scale, inference-and-decision-making systems that involve machines, humans and the environment. Just as early buildings and bridges sometimes fell to the ground — in unforeseen ways and with tragic consequences — many of our early societal-scale inference-and-decision-making systems are already exposing serious conceptual flaws.

      Analogous to the collapse of early bridges and building, before the maturation of civil engineering, our early society-scale inference-and-decision-making systems break down, exposing serious conceptual flaws.

    1. Voysey, M., Clemens, S. A. C., Madhi, S. A., Weckx, L. Y., Folegatti, P. M., Aley, P. K., Angus, B., Baillie, V. L., Barnabas, S. L., Bhorat, Q. E., Bibi, S., Briner, C., Cicconi, P., Collins, A. M., Colin-Jones, R., Cutland, C. L., Darton, T. C., Dheda, K., Duncan, C. J. A., … Zuidewind, P. (2020). Safety and efficacy of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (AZD1222) against SARS-CoV-2: An interim analysis of four randomised controlled trials in Brazil, South Africa, and the UK. The Lancet, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32661-1

    1. Helminths are multicellular worms (for example, tapeworms and roundworms). Helminths reproduce by releasing eggs; animals may consume the eggs which then develop into larvae that can survive even after the animal is killed. Eating raw or undercooked meat can lead to ingesting the larvae. Thorough cooking destroys the larvae.

      Helminths are worms

    2. Additional symptoms may include vomiting, dehydration, lightheadedness, and rapid heartbeat. More severe complications can include a high fever, diarrhea that lasts more than three days, prolonged vomiting, bloody stools, and signs of shock.

      Symptoms of food poison

  9. Nov 2020
    1. How can we help our students feel safe?

      I feel like this question needs to be asked more. We talk about our classrooms as being places where it should be "safe" to take risks and to fail, but it's not enough for us to assert it, and I'd argue not enough for us to implement only the policies which would address our own concerns. We really have to ask how our students perceive their safety.

  10. Oct 2020
    1. Landi, F., Marzetti, E., Sanguinetti, M., Ciciarello, F., Tritto, M., Benvenuto, F., Bramato, G., Brandi, V., Carfì, A., D’Angelo, E., Fusco, D., Lo Monaco, M. R., Martone, A. M., Pagano, F., Rocchi, S., Rota, E., Russo, A., Salerno, A., Cattani, P., … Bernabei, on behalf of the G. A. C.-19 G. T. (n.d.). Should face masks be worn to contain the spread of COVID-19 in the postlockdown phase? Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/traa085

    1. Harries, A. D., Martinez, L., & Chakaya, J. M. (n.d.). SARS-CoV-2: How safe is it to fly and what can be done to enhance protection? Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/traa106