1,192 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2018
    1. CredCo Indicator:Inference - Convincing Evidence

      Question:How convincing do you find the evidence given for the primary claim?

      Answer:Fairly Convincing

    2. "Smoking doesn't seem to blunt the effects of coffee," Gunter said. "It didn't matter whether you smoked or not. There was still a potential beneficial affect of coffee on mortality."

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      "Smoking doesn't seem to blunt the effects of coffee," Gunter said. "It didn't matter whether you smoked or not. There was still a potential beneficial affect of coffee on mortality."

    3. "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

    4. People who drank two to four cups a day had an 18% lower risk of death compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study. These findings are consistent with previous studies that had looked at majority white populations, said Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      People who drank two to four cups a day had an 18% lower risk of death compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study. These findings are consistent with previous studies that had looked at majority white populations, said Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

    5. "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

    6. One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality. The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:An experimental study was conducted (natural experiments OK)

      Highlight:

      One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality.

      The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

    7. "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

    8. "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

    9. In the European study, people who were drinking coffee tended to have lower levels of inflammation, healthier lipid profiles and better glucose control compared with those who weren't.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      In the European study, people who were drinking coffee tended to have lower levels of inflammation, healthier lipid profiles and better glucose control compared with those who weren't.

    10. The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

    11. The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

    12. The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

    13. The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

    14. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Exaggerated Claims

      Question:Does the author exaggerate any claims? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    15. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    16. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    17. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    18. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Slippery Slope

      Question:Does the author say that one small change will lead to a major change (use a slippery slope argument)? Highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    19. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - False Dilemma

      Question:Does the author present a complicated choice as if it were binary (construct a false dilemma)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    20. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Straw Man

      Question:Does the author present the counterargument as a weaker, more foolish version of the real counterargument (use a Straw Man Argument)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    21. However, Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said people should be wary of this finding. "Even if it was in some way true, it doesn't make sense to me, because by smoking, you increase your mortality several-fold. Then, if you reduce it by 10% drinking coffee, give me a break," said Ascherio, who was not involved in the study.

      CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      However, Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said people should be wary of this finding.

      "Even if it was in some way true, it doesn't make sense to me, because by smoking, you increase your mortality several-fold. Then, if you reduce it by 10% drinking coffee, give me a break," said Ascherio, who was not involved in the study.

    22. People who avoid coffee, particularly in places like the US and Europe where drinking the beverage is very common, may do so because they have health problems. Their higher mortality rate could be a result of them being less healthy to begin with.

      CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      People who avoid coffee, particularly in places like the US and Europe where drinking the beverage is very common, may do so because they have health problems. Their higher mortality rate could be a result of them being less healthy to begin with.

    23. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Extent Claims Justified

      Question:To what extent does their confidence in their claims seem justified?

      Answer:Mostly justified

    24. Studies have shown that certain compounds have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce risk for illnesses like Parkinson's disease.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 3

      Highlight:

      Studies have shown that certain compounds have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce risk for illnesses like Parkinson's disease.

    25. The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 2

      Highlight:

      The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

    26. One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality.

    27. Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 3

      Highlight:

      Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,

    28. Marc Gunter, reader in cancer epidemiology and prevention at Imperial College's School of Public Health in the UK, who co-authored the European study.

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 2

      Highlight:

      Marc Gunter, reader in cancer epidemiology and prevention at Imperial College's School of Public Health in the UK, who co-authored the European study.

    29. Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 1

      Highlight:

      Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

    30. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Studies

    31. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Experts

    32. CredCo Indicator:Single Study Article

      Question:Is this article primarily about a single scientific study?

      Answer:No

    33. CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:Is the headline clickbaity?

      Answer:Not at all clickbaity

    34. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:Question: Does the title of the article accurately reflect the content of the article?

      Answer:Completely Representative

    35. Question:Rate your impression of the credibility of this article

      Answer:Somewhat high credibility

    1. CredCo Indicator:Inference - Convincing Evidence

      Question:How convincing do you find the evidence given for the primary claim?

      Answer:Not at All Convincing

    2. A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

    3. Based on their study, Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus, published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      Based on their study, Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus, published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    4. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    5. The Rail-Lippman four-year study involved 170 parents of teenage girls who were given the HPV shots, which usually are administered sequentially in a series of three.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Cause precedes effect

      Highlight:

      The Rail-Lippman four-year study involved 170 parents of teenage girls who were given the HPV shots, which usually are administered sequentially in a series of three.

    6. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Cause precedes effect

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    7. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    8. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Exaggerated Claims

      Question:Does the author exaggerate any claims? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    9. Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

    10. Offit is a mainstream media darling. Ignore Offit. He’s off it and has made millions with his vaccine patent. And ignore the presstitutes who feed off him.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Offit is a mainstream media darling. Ignore Offit. He’s off it and has made millions with his vaccine patent. And ignore the presstitutes who feed off him.

    11. That’s my thought for the average vaccine indoctrinated sheeple. But my thoughts get nastier with the manic frothing-at-the-mouth vaccine fanatics, and downright vicious with the vaccine industry and its celebrated spokesman Dr. Paul Offit.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      That’s my thought for the average vaccine indoctrinated sheeple. But my thoughts get nastier with the manic frothing-at-the-mouth vaccine fanatics, and downright vicious with the vaccine industry and its celebrated spokesman Dr. Paul Offit.

    12. pro-vaccine hysteria criticism,

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      pro-vaccine hysteria criticism,

    13. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    14. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    15. Of course they were roundly attacked through the Canadian mainstream media.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Of course they were roundly attacked through the Canadian mainstream media.

    16. The mainstream media piled on with remarks from the usual “prestigious” medical professionals who asserted HPV vaccinations safety and remarkable success at reducing ovarian cancer.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      The mainstream media piled on with remarks from the usual “prestigious” medical professionals who asserted HPV vaccinations safety and remarkable success at reducing ovarian cancer.

    17. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    18. And unbound or free aluminum, the stuff used in almost all vaccines, is a neurological toxin.

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      And unbound or free aluminum, the stuff used in almost all vaccines, is a neurological toxin.

    19. Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

    20. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    21. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Slippery Slope

      Question:Does the author say that one small change will lead to a major change (use a slippery slope argument)? Highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    22. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - False Dilemma

      Question:Does the author present a complicated choice as if it were binary (construct a false dilemma)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    23. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Straw Man

      Question:Does the author present the counterargument as a weaker, more foolish version of the real counterargument (use a Straw Man Argument)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    24. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    25. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Extent Claims Justified

      Question:To what extent does their confidence in their claims seem justified?

      Answer:Not at all justified

    26. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    27. A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

    28. Harper mentioned the medically known fact that 98 percent of HPV warts among sexually active women heal on their own within a year or two.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      Harper mentioned the medically known fact that 98 percent of HPV warts among sexually active women heal on their own within a year or two.

    29. [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

    30. [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 3

      Highlight:

      [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

    31. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 2

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    32. Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus,

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus,

    33. published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    34. one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 2

      Highlight:

      one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper,

    35. Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 1

      Highlight:

      Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman,

    36. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Studies

    37. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Experts

    38. Canadian Concordia University’s kinesiology professor Genevieve Rail was awarded a grant of $270,000 to study the effects of HPV vaccines on the public.

      CredCo Indicator:Single Study Article

      Question:Is this article primarily about a single scientific study?

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Canadian Concordia University’s kinesiology professor Genevieve Rail was awarded a grant of $270,000 to study the effects of HPV vaccines on the public.

    39. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Inducing fear (“Is Your Boyfriend Cheating on You?”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    40. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Hidden secret or trick (“Fitness Companies Hate Him...”, “Experts are Dying to Know Their Secret”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    41. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Provoking emotions, such as shock or surprise (“...Shocking Result”, “...Leave You in Tears”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    42. CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:Is the headline clickbaity?

      Answer:Somewhat clickbaity

    43. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:How is the title unrepresentative of the content of the article? (Select all that apply).

      Answer:Title carries little information about the body

    44. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:How is the title unrepresentative of the content of the article? (Select all that apply).

      Answer:Title emphasizes different information than the body

    45. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:Question: Does the title of the article accurately reflect the content of the article?

      Answer:Somewhat Unrepresentative

    46. Question:Rate your impression of the credibility of this article

      Answer:Somewhat low credibility

  2. Apr 2018
    1. General Advertizer

      The General Advertiser was an eighteenth-century newspaper. It was originally known as the London Daily Post and General Advertiser, and then became the General Advertiser. Printer Henry Woodfall took over the paper in 1713, renaming it the Public Advertiser. He operated it until his nineteen-year-old son, Henry Sampson Woodfall, took over the paper in 1769. relaunched as the Public Advertiser with much more news content. In 1758, the printer's nineteen-year-old son, Henry Sampson Woodfall took it over. During this time, The anonymous polemicist Junius sent his letters to the Public Advertiser. Henry Sampson Woodfall sold his interest in the Public Advertiser in November 1793. N. Byrne took it over and printed it as the Political and Literary Diary, but it went out of business by 1795.

  3. Mar 2018
    1. Many lives have been saved by parents doing something simple. Beginning in the 1960s American military doctors and researchers in Dhaka developed a therapy for acute diarrhoea—a sweet, salty oral rehydration solution. This is now dirt cheap and widely available. At the last count, fully 84% of Bangladeshi parents with stricken children fed it to them (only a third saw a doctor). Thinly populated African countries are struggling to match that. One promising idea is to distribute the sachets along with Coca-Cola—which gets everywhere.

      amazing the reach of Coca-Cola!

    2. many Indians continue to defecate in the open. Bangladesh’s government and charities have built latrines, too, but they have worked harder to stigmatise open defecation. Often they install latrines for the poor and then prod richer folk into following their example. A new, surprising, finding is that this works better than expecting people to copy their social superiors.
    1. Mention has been made of the new environmental body. Strictly speaking, under this clause as it currently stands, the Government would be able to establish, under secondary legislation, the kind of body that the noble Lord, Lord Krebs, who is no longer in his place, was arguing for earlier—a body so powerful it could sanction other public bodies, including the Government, if it was able to reproduce the powers that presently rest with the European Commission. That is an enormous power, which this House would not allow the Executive arm of government on its own without primary legislation conducted through the two Houses.

      interesting point

  4. Feb 2018
    1. This is unsettling. Why are the world’s greatest public technocrats also its greatest private technophobes? It seemed as if they were following the cardinal rule of drug dealing: never get high on your own supply.
  5. Nov 2017
  6. Oct 2017
    1. the slow collapse of public health and education, resurgent child poverty, the epidemic of loneliness, the collapse of ecosystems

      It is the same as what we learnt before from British economy history. Under the rule of Mrs. Thatcher, through the destruction of labor movement and opening foreign competition to weak the forces of global trade. Inducing the heavy industry system, the large state-owned enterprises carry out radical privatization reform and other measures to complete the transformation of economic structure, So that the British from a traditional heavy industrial countries, into a service-oriented emerging economies. Mrs. Thatcher has focused on weakening public spending such as education, health care and social welfare, and she claims to "turn Britain from a society of interdependence to a self-sustaining society." Under her leadership, Britain has gradually become a country with relatively cheap labor and flexible labor. However, as it shows today, British people are facing an unreasonable high retirement age and suffering from dramatic social classes gap.

    1. Anti-vaccinations groups, for example, have reliedon viral videos to sell the panic of vaccination side-effects

      Unfortunately, this is very true. We can say the same about fake news. Such practices can contribute to hurting the validity of the overall data. The Twitter data is not collected with systematic investigation or systematic collection methods. This data collection method heavily relies on “public opinion”. I do think that if one wants to find general public sentiment or general public opinion, this is a great way to do it.

  7. Sep 2017
    1. dive too much into the small world theory, let’s review some key SNA concepts.

      I LOVE LOVE LOVE this. It tells me you have a purpose to your blog post. You have an audience in mind and you understand the goal here is to communicate beyond the academy to inform a broader public. This is what public sociology is all about! Excellent!

    1. Even if government may (and perhaps must) monitor and regulate the way that drugs or TMS devices affect our health and safety, there may be aspects of the way we use such cognitive enhancement tools that should be reserved by the Constitution (or perhaps through other means) solely for free and unrestricted individual choice.

      Except mind altering drugs often affect more than the individual themselves. Autonomy out to give way, in instances like these, to the greater public good/safety. Our choices always affect more than just ourselves.

    1. Calling people out using the constructionist ideals — The American government is not living up to their high ideals.

      Poetry as a way to express frustration when there is no way to go up against actual US military power. A weapon of the weak; a powerful message.

    1. Court repudiated the notion that a person who places documents with a bank would, as a result, forsake an expectation of confidentiality. In the view of the Court, even if the documents cease to be at a place other than in the custody and control of the customer, privacy attaches to persons and not places and hence the protection of privacy is not diluted

      2 important observations

      • recognition of privacy attached to persons and and not places (moving beyond a propertarian view of privacy)

      • sharing of information does not lead to forsaking a reasonable expectation of privacy. Without reference, repudiation of third party doctrine. privacy not quivalent with secrecy.

    2. Aristotle’s distinction between the public and private realms can be regarded as providing a basis for restricting governmental authority to activities falling within the public realm.

      Aristotle's Public v private sphere. Role of government restricted to public sphere. Early conception of a sphere of rights (?) repelling state action

    3. Mill posited that the tyranny of the majority could be reined by the recognition of civil rights such as the individual right to privacy, free speech, assembly and expression

      Mill's conception of civil liberties to counter majoritarian actions

    4. If the reason for protecting privacy is the dignity of the individual, the rationale for its existence does not cease merely because the individual has to interact with others in the public arena. The extent to which an individual expects privacy in a public street may be different from that which she expects in the sanctity of the home

      'Man is a social animal' is not a valid counter to right to privacy

  8. Aug 2017
  9. Jul 2017
    1. Napoleon oak genome sequencing project web site: example of public engagement in tree genomics

  10. Jun 2017
    1. Done regularly whenever she addresses the viewer, though it's justified as the show originally was supposed to be set in a computer game. This then leads into a ten second pause during which she stares directly at you waiting for a "response from the viewer."
  11. May 2017
  12. Mar 2017
    1. university president public years center research million national latimes san executive major project board humanities

      The word humanities appears in this third-largest topic of the model. It is an institutional topic, with words about organizations, officers, governing structures, development and resources.

    1. Bringing Bridj to Kansas City seemed like a no-brainer to transit officials. For just $1.50, anyone could use an app to summon a ride downtown in van that would follow a route calculated on the fly by an algorithm. No one within the service area was ever more than a 10 minute walk from a stop, and as an added incentive, your first 10 rides were free.

      Never heard of it.

  13. www.openbookpublishers.com www.openbookpublishers.com
    1. What Does It Mean to Open Education? Perspectives on Using Open Educational Resources at a US Public University1
  14. Feb 2017
    1. This article acknowledges the lack of research in understanding how children of incarcerated parents are impacted. The authors discuss the multitude of consequences that can affect children in the present and future; including delinquent behavior, learning barriers, unemployment, and antisocial behavior. With the expansion of criminality, the problem is vastly growing.

      The authors didn’t find evidence to the claim that “children of prisoners are five to six times more likely to be convicted or imprisoned” compared to their peers. They blame variables and use of methodological approaches insufficiently as reasons why findings may have been exaggerated. The authors do present evidence that shows that children are more likely to be arrested, antisocial, and the like, but maintain that data is limited and needs more research to have a definitive answer. The authors referenced the new Cambrdge study and did discuss that it found antisocial behavior to be more apparent in those who had parents incarcerated.

      After discussing five studies that addressed children’s behavior patterns with incarcerated parents, they conclude that parental imprisonment puts a risk on children to develop antisocial behavior patterns. However, they attribute this not to it being a cause, but rather the imprisonment of a parent to be a predictor of child outcomes. They believe that these consequences are from disadvantages of the parents’ imprisonment, rather than the imprisonment itself. Therefore, they conclude that damage was done to the child before the parents was imprisoned.

      The authors do not dismiss that trauma theory, popular in small-scale studies of the affects of children of prisoners. They cite that the longer or more often a parent is incarcerated can have negative affects on the child’s emotional state.

      Overall, the authors cite many mediating factors in the study of children with imprisoned parents. They seem to hold the standards exceptionally high for the methodological approaches to this study and dismiss the studies previously done based on rigor and mediating variables.

    1. The reason we find ourselves in this mess with ubiquitous surveillance, filter bubbles, and fake news (propaganda) is precisely due to the utter and complete destruction of the public sphere by an oligopoly of private infrastructure that poses as public space.

      This is a whole new tragedy of the commons: people don't know where the commons actually are anymore.

    1. Not surprh,ingly, as women's education improved, women increasingly began to speak in public :md to reflect on their rhetorical practices.

      From the intro to Mary Astell's section: "For Astell, women's rhetoric should focus on the art of conversation... This is women's proper rhetorical sphere, different from but in no way inferior to the public sphere in which men use oratory" (845).

      In what ways does this new focus on women's public oratory affect Astell's insistence on private, domestic, and/or conversational discourse as sites of rhetorical power? Especially as we consider this part from Mary Beard's lecture: "In the early fourth century BC Aristophanes devoted a whole comedy to the ‘hilarious’ fantasy that women might take over running the state. Part of the joke was that women couldn’t speak properly in public – or rather, they couldn’t adapt their private speech (which in this case was largely fixated on sex) to the lofty idiom of male politics."

    1. This is all great, but here's the annoying thing: it should be totally unnecessary. These are digitizations of public domain works, and there's no reasonable basis for granting them any copyright protection that would need to be divested with a CC0 mark in the first place. They are not creative transformative works, and in fact they are the opposite: attempts to capture the original as faithfully and accurately as possible, with no detectable changes in the transfer from one medium to another. It might take a lot of work, but sweat of the brow does not establish copyright, and allowing such images to be re-copyrighted (in some cases hundreds or even thousands of years after their original creation) would be pointless and disastrous.

      Interesting. I never realized there was this much of a distinction between CC0 and the CC PD license, but it makes sense.

  15. Jan 2017
    1. They Write best per haps who do't with the gcn-111.uc..~ so., tile and easy air of Conversation;

      It is interesting that she is claiming that the best writers are excellent, gentle speakers in smaller, private conversations while also declaring that women have no role behind the pulpit. She seems to imply both that women are naturally the best at speaking privately and conversationally, and implying that the best public speakers would be those who conduct themselves similarly, yet she clearly states that women should not speak publicly. There is some strange logical contortionism happening here.

      In previous coursework, I've read feminist theory in which the authors would work within the acceptable framework of what authority women did have in society--typically, this was religious authority (but only as lay people, not religious leaders), or in morality and gentility. Although her declaration that women "have no business with the Pulpit, the Bar or St. Stephens Chapel," perhaps she is merely trying to suggest that gentility (which women are granted by nature) should give women more authority in private relationships, rather than public ones. The argument for private authority was sometimes prioritized over the argument for public authority, with the assumption that if women were treated equally as private citizens, public equality would follow.

      Then again, the rest of this section is very black-and-white (and boring as hell) and does not seem to include any subversive plans to overthrow the patriarchy. So I might be giving her a little too much credit with this addition.

    1. I don’t want the culture of open source to be organized around a legal definition. I want to zoom out and look at the broader ecosystem (of which the legal definition is one, essential node). A friendlier, more accessible term would make it easier to discuss topics like sustainability, collaboration, and people involved. Those aspects don’t need to be included in the official definition, but they still matter.I still like the term “public software” because it allows more people (including those new to, or unfamiliar with, open source, even if they use or benefit from it) to quickly understand what open source software is and how it should be protected. It doesn’t change the legal definition at all; if anything, it enforces it better, because we would want to define and protect public software exactly as we would any other public resource.

      I remember the term "Public Software" used several years ago from the Lula's initiative to migrate Brasil public software infrastructure to Free Software.

      Now there is, again, and effort to discuss the term, this time from a Anglo-centric perspective. Native English speaking people, particularly in US have the trouble with free as in freedom and as in "gratis", meanings and being immersed in a "market first" mentality, usually they think first in price and markets instead of rights.

      Dmitry Kleiner has addressed the problem of software as a commons and its sustainability with an alternative license (p2p license), that is not as restrictive as the Fair Software one, but it repolitize the capitalist friendly Open Source gentrification of the original Free Software movement, involving also a core concern of sustainability.

      Would be nice to see a dialogue between Nadia's and Dmitry's perspectives and questions about software as a commons.

  16. Dec 2016
    1. A functional programming language is one that supports and encourages programming without side-effects.
  17. Oct 2016
    1. Once you pay for 12 full MiWay fares during any one-week (Monday to Sunday) using your PRESTO card, you can then ride free on MiWay for the remainder of that week!

      Those loyalty programs are pretty interesting. Wish the same existed for day and monthly passes.

  18. Sep 2016
    1. (Crazy app uptake + riding data + math wizardry = many surprises in store.)

      Like Waze for public transit? Way to merge official Open Data from municipal authorities with the power of crowdsourcing mass transportation.

    1. who will (and will not) control and define the learning process, who will (and will not) profit from the ways that learning processes are enacted, who will (and will not) have access to science and scholarship and the infrastructure necessary for creating it, who will (and will not) participate in the design of curriculum and assessment and learning spaces, who will (and will not) profit from the benefits of science and artistry, and who will (and will not) have opportunities to attend schools and colleges.

      Several (though not all) of these questions relate to the core sociological one: Who Decides? The list sounds, in part, like a call for deeper and more nuanced “stakeholders” thinking than the typical case study. The apparent focus (at least with parenthetical mentions of those excluded) is on the limits of inclusion. From this, we could already be thinking about community-building, especially in view of a strong Community of Practice.

  19. Aug 2016
    1. When Robertson started out, they were hosting small rummage sales and bake sales. But by the 2008 recession, PTA fundraising had graduated to silent auctions. The money from fundraising was enough to allow Grattan to maintain its academics and actually expand its staff and its infrastructure in the midst of statewide budget cuts.

      Let's just highlight a root problem here, then: "statewide budget cuts".

      Why should any public school ever have to do fundraising?

    1. more than 1,500 educators and leaders of public, private and charter schools

      Do you even need teachers in this system? Perhaps we will call them concierges and pay them like Trump would pay his hotel and casino workers. You would certainly need more of them under any kind of coaching, mentoring regime.

    2. used

      This is the difference between these two products. The agency is direct with Google. I use Google Classroom. Here it is flipped. Facebook uses you and your inputs to filter out--what? Is there any proof that what FB filters is connected well with the incredibly complexity of learner curiosity and passion. I can only say that Zuckerberg and his minions must have poured over Skinner's pigeon experiments because now he is giving us all the bird.

    3. The idea is to encourage students to develop skills, like resourcefulness and time management, that might help them succeed in college.

      I am assuming that there is strong data that establishes a strong correlation between this LMS and resourcefulness-timemanagement-college success? How many acts of faith can dance on the head of a pin?

    4. student-directed learning system

      How can they say student-directed. It's a Facebook algorithm.

    5. Facebook is out to upend the traditional student-teacher relationship.

      Which student-teacher relationship? It is not monolithic. The power relationship? The sharing relationship? Or the whole relationship? When they are done will there be teachers anymore? If it can be done by a robot algorithm then is should be done by a robot algorithm?

  20. Jul 2016
    1. Page 35

      open science has been subjected to rigorous economic analysis and found to meet the needs of modern, market-based societies. As an economic framework open Science is based on the premise that scholarly information is a "public good." Public goods have two defining elements. One is that they can be shared without lessening their value; the economic term is non rival. Call David quotes Thomas Jefferson's eloquent statement in 1813 on this point: he who receives an idea from me comma receives instruction himself without lessening mine: as he who lights his paper at mine receives light without dark getting me. The second characteristic of public goods is that they are difficult and costly to hold exclusively while putting them to use semicolon the economic term is non-excludable.

    1. and the significance of choices among language uses.

      I'm reminded of something Shondel said in our Ed Linguistics seminar: choosing a register or dialect of speech is not like choosing a color of a car. There are serious identity-psychological implications of these choices.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Her solution is pedagogical: a shift toward inquiry as social action. Rather than encouraging students merely to write about what interests them or to take a definitive position in a paper or speech (requiring them to decide whether something is good or bad), Rice proposes that educators encourage their students to investigate the complexities of a given topic without a commitment to reaching a conclusion.

      This.

  21. Jun 2016
    1. How’s your film history? When I say, “Fatty Arbuckle,” what comes to mind? The film comedian who raped a girl with a Coke bottle and killed her, right? When you do your homework, you discover not only that there was no Coke bottle, but that Arbuckle had nothing to do with the woman’s death and was fully exonerated in court.

      The guy was totally innocent. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roscoe_Arbuckle

    2. There is also the matter of the system that we—the liberal elite—are quietly creating in which all abuse claims are trusted at face value and any questioning of them is subsequently shamed. I understand that a big part of our culture, our rape culture, is founded on ignoring or disbelieving victims and the societal imperative among the sensitive and educated is to correct that. But without scrutiny even where it’s uncomfortable, we are putting justice at grave risk. So are abuse victims, thereby, at grave risk. Weide’s exercise strikes me as morally sound, at heart.
  22. May 2016
    1. Researching the chosen issue

      Although there is much more that is possible in connecting youth in the middle of their research process, our experience of having students post at many and early stages of their inquiry/research process is invaluable!

  23. Apr 2016
    1. Education is no longer viewed as a public good but a private right, just as critical thinking is devalued as a fundamental necessity for creating an engaged and socially responsible populace.

    1. massmediarefers to those means of transmission

      When I ask students to post on Youth Voices, I'm asking them to participate in mass media. It's a big jump for some who do very little by friend-to-friend communication.

  24. Mar 2016
    1. Where academic Twitter once seemed quietly parochial and collegial almost to the point of excess, it is now thrust into the messy, contested business of being truly open to the public.

      is being in the public the problem, or is it the change of the tone or format of discourse?

      fully public honest but still civil discussions aiming at making a case, creating more awareness, finding solutions, or trying to understand, clarify, show genuine interest .... is better than a public fight .. right? or am I misunderstanding this?

  25. Feb 2016
  26. Jan 2016
    1. international law system

      Wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_legal_system

      Does an International legal informatics database exist yet?

    2. Promote a biocentric instead of and anthropocentric paradigms.

      Biocentric includes man and includes him in an appropriately prioritized order. An anthropocentric view should be a biocentric, ecocentric, charitable, human view simply because humans are (among other things) organisms, situated in ecosystems, capable of charity, love, humility and that is in fact what makes us human. What is best for the environment is what is best for humans and everything else.

    3. Ecocide

      Interesting idea. The only thing is that the science is not where we would like it to be. Most of the accusing will need to be done in retrospect. In that case, many will have lost culpability due to insufficient knowledge. I just wonder how this will hold up in a court of law for most practical cases. For some large-scale cases, I can see it working, as long as the effects are enormous.

    4. Land defenders are dying but the news don’t talk about this. Most of media and politics are owned by companies so, we have to force them to serve the people instead. We can’t depend on these guys.

      We need to recognize different values and think that people value land entitlements, family and community, the elderly, connectivity. If we value these, we will want to hear these things reported all the time. Marketing will follow suit. Perhaps marketing will be the first to move...

    5. Here is a video of paul Watson's talk: video

    6. Two great Mother Earth defenders were present on the last day of COP 21 in the public area.

      Is there any way of finding he transcripts for this day?

    1. 180,000 public domain items from the New York Public Library Digital Collections. Photographs, stereoscopic photos, illustrations, maps, ancient texts, manuscripts, historical correspondence, sheet music, and more!

      http://api.repo.nypl.org/<br> https://github.com/NYPL-publicdomain/data-and-utilities<br> API and metadata

      http://nypl.org/publicdomain<br> More info, and some projects that use the API.