255 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. While our program still faces some challenges around engaging our students and keeping them enrolled in programs long enough to complete their goals, technology has allowed us to make some remarkable strides.

      A school system that extends to adult education utilizes online apps as an option (but doesn't require internet access, as many people lack it at home). They have found them to be helpful, especially because people who work odd shift jobs and have burst of time at odd hours can get some practice in. This is most helpful for ESL learners. 6/10

    1. Therefore, practitioners need to be cognisant of the important role they play in influenc-ing learner motivation when designing learning activities. Most importantly, the relevance and value of the task (e.g., online discussions) need to be clearly identified and linked to learning objectives to help learners understand how the activity can aid in the realisation of personal goals, aspirations, and interests, both in the short and longer term.

      Based on research and two small scale case studies, some students in online learning are intrinsically motivated, but others need to be motivated by the teacher and material. External influences such as deadlines and grades also influenced student motivation. Identified regulation, that is, knowing why the activity is valuable and important, make a very big difference in student motivation. This brings us back to the andragogical idea that the assignments should involve real-world situations and be applicable to students' lives. 9/10

    1. Handbook of Research on Student-Centered Strategies in Online Adult Learning Environments

      This article showcases a framework for course design using theory and research in the learning sciences. It defines student-centered learning and explains how it can/ should be used in the creation of the course and when establishing which theories and methods to structure the course around. 9/10, very detailed source.

    1. TEAL Fact Sheet

      Teaching Excellence in Adult Learning (TEAL), a great list of resources for different aspects of adult learning. Theories, lesson planning, student centered... The rest of the website has excellent resources as well. It can be a little daunting to try to navigate but a great resource all the same.

      10/10

    1. EAL Center Fact Sheet No. 11: Adult Learning Theories

      This is an extensive site that offers many resources for adult learning. TEAL (Teaching Excellence in Adult Learning) has helpful information for planning, UDL, goal setting and much more.

      10/10 This site cites its sources and is easy to use.

    1. but they should be engaging, because this leads to students beingmore motivated to learn and succeed.The possibilities of how students interact with content and with each other are greatly expanded in a hybrid course; just having themread articles online and then meet to discuss themin-class, for example, takes no real advantage of a class format that can otherwise be a transformative experience.

      This article, published by the College of DuPage, gives an introduction to hybrid learning environments. The authors outline the benefits of hybrid learning, how to utilize time wisely, the student experience (both in person and online), and how to structure and plan hybrid courses.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. Claire Du 2nd degree connection2nd Claire has a account Stanford '24 | AI4Youth Canada
    1. Riri Jiang 3rd degree connection3rd Riri has a account Student at Princeton University

      Bumped into this profile while looking for something. Impressive list of achievements at a young age. Model to emulate

  2. Sep 2020
    1. Most instructors will have the experience and knowledge of their students’ situation to make wise choices about activities that will work best.

      Academic professors are acknowledging their students well-being which is important and shows care from both sides of the professor and student. This allows the student know that even though the professor is mainly involved with education, they still care.

    1. Student assignments that promote student publishing or participating on the open web (open teaching or open pedagogy)

      Open pedagogy is an important approach to tap into student-generated content. Generative learning theory has so much potential to foster learning experience and maximise leanring outcomes.

    1. Considerable research indicates that college students are bothmore likely to persist and to perform at high academic levelswhen they perceive themselves to be members of a cooperativeand supportive learning community (Kuh, 2009; Tinto, 2006;Zhao & Ku, 2004)

      For another study, being a member of a cooperative and supportive learning environment may moderate the rates for persistence and academic performance in college.

  3. Aug 2020
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  5. Jun 2020
  6. May 2020
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  8. Feb 2020
  9. Nov 2019
    1. Pre-service teachers can benefit from the use of simulations that reproduce classroom environments, student behaviors and profiles, and academic outcomes to guide their craft as educators. In this text, simSchool is briefly evaluated by student teachers to determine its usefulness. While the study had significant limitations of volunteer test subjects in a one-time usage of the tool, simSchool still was given some high marks for it's purpose and realistic depiction of student profiles and classroom environment. Finding suggest simulations like simSchool can continue to improve and with long-term use, would be effective at developing skills for educators. Rating: 8/10

    1. The text documents a year-long research project into experiential learning in teacher professional development. Teachers participated in experiential learning themselves to then begin to implement it into their own classrooms to serve their students. By and large, teachers were receptive, had misconceptions addressed, changed their practices with their colleagues and students to develop more engaging and active classrooms. Essentially, a shift from teacher-centered learning to student-centered learning was achieved in small increments by using experiential learning and reflection to facilitate teacher growth thereby creating new pathways for student learning. Given the nature of the traditional methods predominantly used, this study seems to reflect some elements of transformative learning in which teacher conventions and ideas were challenged and adjusted through heterogenous groups and personal reflection. Rating: 9/10

  10. Oct 2019
    1. As high-paying jobs and college degrees are becoming far out of reach, and student debt continues increasing drastically, barriers to success are growing so high for most Americans that they are now unsurpassable.
  11. Sep 2019
    1. When assignments are optional, compliance will vary and you risk exacerbating differences in study skills, background knowledge, and the like.

      I can't help but wonder if the emphasis on "content retention" and "compliance" that seems to be core to the authors' concept of learning doesn't make some bad assumptions: that learning is something that an instructor does to a student, and not something that students have agency over. This seems to me to be in extreme conflict with what might be even more inclusive practice: far less emphasis on the grade, more individual attention and greater emphasis on personal growth, less teacher control and more student agency. This is basic Freire stuff. Students aren't vessels to be filled.

    2. The more structure, the better for all students. 
    3. Add structure to small-group discussions. 
    4. Allow anonymous participation. 
    5. Counteract self-perceptions that stunt student learning. 
    6. With multiple assessments in class, students practice asking themselves metacognitive questions such as, “How do I know I understand something?” As the instructor, you also benefit by learning immediately how many students are having trouble with a particular concept or skill

      lots low states assessments

    7. set clear expectations — and avoid unnecessary stress and miscommunication

      minimize student anxiety w these 5 tips

    8. Reduce the stakes of major papers and tests. 
    1. Because documentation of student learning impacts may not reflect the core objectives of all CTLs — and because this investigation is resource-intensive

      Measuring impact of on student learning outcomes is resource-intensive. This makes me think of the Tracer project.

  12. Aug 2019
  13. Jul 2019
    1. The CUNY students I spoke with were universally opposed to — and dissatisfied with — these platforms

      How can students play a more active, integral role when institutions are considering adopting these platforms?

  14. Jun 2019
    1. This year, the Promise’s marketing has emphasized vocational college. Administrators hope marginal students will be less likely to drop out of such programs because they are shorter.

      Vocational programs are great for "Builders", who learn by doing stuff than merely reciting study material.

    2. “The challenges that people bring with them to education because of poverty don’t just go away because we say we’re going to pay for college education,”

      Reminds me of "The boy who couldn't read"

    1. Income share agreements could lower costs and improve outcomes by tying loan amounts to objective judgments of how much the student is likely to earn from her degree. Educational quality could also benefit: Investors would presumably advance students money only for schools that were doing a decent job of teaching them. The risks are that some borrowers could end up paying far more under such a scheme than the current plan and that investors might not lend to students they consider too risky.

      The author's counter arguments to Income Share Agreements are not convincing enough for me. They seem abstract and vague.

    2. His administration cut out the middlemen by killing off the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, the one created under Presidents Johnson and Nixon that relied on banks, in favor of a direct loan program, in which money came from the Treasury. But the government’s loose lending policy, with few questions asked, remained in place. The Obama administration also heavily promoted income-based repayment programs, which set borrowers’ monthly payments at 10% of their discretionary income and then forgave a portion of their debt after 20 to 25 years of payments. This severed the link between the value of students’ education and how much they could borrow, providing a huge incentive for schools to raise tuition, since taxpayers would pick up more of the tab. Enrollment in these programs is one big reason that the government’s costs for student loans are exploding.

      Obama revisions to the original student loan program of 1970s started under Johnson and Nixon.

    3. The voucher system, combined with a lack of government oversight, created perverse incentives: Colleges could raise money quickly by admitting academically suspect students while suffering little or no consequences if their students dropped out and defaulted on loans.
    4. In particular, the system gave colleges an incentive to maximize the tuition they extracted from students and the federal taxpayer by boosting fees and enrollment, which meant relaxing admissions standards.

      Reason for inflation in tuition fees -

      1. Higher Enrollment
      2. Relaxing Admission Standards
  15. Apr 2019
    1. Elizabeth Evans Getzel is the Director for Transition Innovations at Virginia Commonwealth University and has a long history of working with students with disabilities in higher education. The article focuses on how the integration of support for students with disabilities is extremely important to their persistence and this includes technology integration and requires buy-in from the faculty.

    1. This article is a study of both in-person and online courses and the affect of internet usage on the student's engaged int those courses. The article notes how saturated the learning environment has become and their approach to using student self-reported data to measure engagement. The authors provide an extensive review of prior literature on both technology and student engagement topics. The data should be reviewed with caution, as it is outlined by the authors that the questions have not been thoroughly vetted for validity and reliability.

      Rating: 6/10. The article had positive results, but the data questions being untested is a bit concerning. The article is also from 2009, and the landscape has changed much since then.

    1. This journal article, written by Amaury Nora, who is currently the Dean for Research at the University of Texas San Antonio and Blanca Plazas Snyder who was pursuing a degree in educational psychology at the time this article as written. The author's bring an honest review of technology and include the benefits, the downfalls and they identify areas where more research needs to be conducted (especially around student persistence).

      Rating: 9/10. The article is informative and takes many perspectives. The only flaw is that when discussing technology in Higher Education, this article is from 2008, but it was also helpful to get the perspective from 10 years ago.

  16. Mar 2019
    1. YouTube playlist of my classes' Student Production Award winning projects from the Ohio Valley chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (the organization behind the Emmy awards).

    1. The benefits of personalized learning through technology This resource is included in part because it connects personalized learning and technology. A brief list of benefits, such as increasing student engagement and bridging the gap between teachers and students, are listed. This is presented by a marketing unit of a university so there may be an agenda. Nonetheless it provides useful considerations such as helping learners develop 'design thinking.' rating 3/5

  17. Feb 2019
    1. but you will not yet have been given much of a feel for how a computer-based augmentation system can really help a person

      This is rather interesting in that Engelbart is saying not knowing much about the technical details is almost an asset here.

    2. language

      The means we use to encode affect language. Why doesn't it affect the message or the concept as well?

      Do people feel they need to use an emoji as part of their message or is its use triggered by the medium?

    3. concepts in their raw, unverbalized form

      There is a way to use symbols to evoke an original message in a natural language. Unlike shorthand, which are symbols that have a direct reference to words or syllables, Rozan's notetaking method for interpreters focuses on concepts. Originally published in French in 1956, it was probably not well known at the time Engelbart wrote this report. Interpreters do not work finding word equivalence, but concepts recreated in another language. An example here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpreting_notes

    4. he could successfully make use of even more powerful symbol-structure manipulation processes utilizing the Memex capabilities

      Scalability

    5. Extension of existing photographic techniques to give each individual a continuously available miniature camera for recording anything

      A mobile phone. A tool to make any of us become a reporter anywhere.

    6. This supplemented the individual's memory and ability to visualize. (We are not concerned here with the value derived from human cooperation made possible by speech and writing, both forms of external symbol manipulation. We speak of the manual means of making graphical representations of symbols—

      The expression "manual means of making graphical representation" makes me think of photography as a memory aid or augmenting tool. Although, of course, it would not necessarily refer to a symbolic portrayal.

      Interestingly, neuroscience today affirms our memory is far from a simple pointing to the past function, but it actually alters or edits the memory itself each time we go back to it and probably the subject who remembers changes in the process. Could that be an example of how technological aids can augment our brain processing of memories?

      I have recently explored this idea on my blog in a post called As We May Remember (a wink to the Vannebar Bush essay) http://eltnotes.blogspot.com/2019/02/as-we-may-remember.html

    7. first draft could represent a free outpouring of thoughts

      This paragraph outlines a truly augmented way of writing that cannot happen using paper. To me noting on paper has changed purpose. Sometimes it is an echo noting of a quote, a key word, a diagram. It is closer to drawing. But writing as thinking out loud, writing as trying to make sense...that is tech aided. I am sure my mind changes its processimg focus depending on whether I face a screen or a copybook. Just as you shift perspective when you watch through a camera lens to take a good pic...you see more.

    1. Occasionally he inserts a comment of his own, either linking it into the main trail or joining it by a side trail to a particular item

      At this point in reading, I remember a story written by Cortázar: Continuity of the Parks. We slowly learn that the reader of the story is actually the protagonist. I am annotating about someone foreshadowing my own annotation method. "A trail of many items" could well be the many tabs open in my browser, for instance. Kind of seeing yourself in a mirror as you follow the description.

      Continuity of the Parks. A one-page story downloadable here.

    2. The process of tying two items together is the important thing.

      Learning through layered asociations.Learning as hyperlinking.

    1. A primary goal of this research is to understand the relationships between two key domains: (a) teacher thought processes and knowledge and (b) teachers’ actions and their observable effects. The current work on the TPACK framework seeks to extend this tradition of research and scholarship by bringing technology integration into the kinds of knowledge that teachers need to consider when teaching

      How can teachers instruct using what they know about teaching, their content knowledge about a subject, and their knowledge about technology tools that will help them to gain full student understanding?

  18. Jan 2019
    1. That’s true not just within the classroom environment, but in the web of interactions students experience

      Subtle call for more cross-campus collaborations between faculty and administration. A productive form of shared governance.

  19. Nov 2018
    1. Retention and graduation rates increase for community colleges that beef up or get creative with their student advising services.

      Retention and graduation rates increase for community colleges that beef up or get creative with their student advising services.

    1. Several problems and barriers to technological integration are often included in the discussion about using technology in higher education, however it is less common that solutions are presented. This article proposes solutions for transforming educational technology through personalized experiences and collaboration.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Early Attrition among First Time eLearners: A Review of Factors that Contribute to Drop-out, Withdrawal and Non-completion Rates of Adult Learners undertaking eLearning Programmes

      NEW - This study researches dropout rates in eLearning. There are many reasons for attrition with adult eLearners which can be complex and entwined. The researched provide different models to test and also a list of barriers to eLearning - where technology issues ranked first. In conclusion, the authors determined that further research was necessary to continue to identify the factors that contribute to adult learner attrition.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. This article stuck me immediately as a former K-12 teacher who now works in higher education. Andragogy and Pedagogy are both extremely similar and unalike in many ways. It is important to understand technological styles in pedagogy, as this article demonstrates, in order to effectively apply similar principles in the higher education setting.

      Rating: 8/10

    2. At the intersection of technology and pedagogy:considering styles of learning and teaching

      When examining the pedagogy of learning, teacher and student centered approaches, there is additional evidence supporting a model moving more towards technology-based learning. This articles considers the question of technology in the classroom and its' advantages/disadvantages.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. This article brings up the important issue of accessibility as a barrier to technology integration. It is suggested that accessibility should be a much more pressing concern than technological relevance to a lesson plan. First it is important to know whether or not all students will still have equal access and ability to reach mastery with the deliver method provided.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This article focuses on the importance of using technological integration in the classroom correctly and effectively. Barriers to effectiveness, as the article states, are often linked to lack of rational, vision, or necessity for including technology in instruction.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This is scholarly article that shares research findings in questions such as, to what extent is there a relationship between faculty's comfortableness with technology and perception of technology integration and student success? The data is very interesting, including the fact that students in the sample reported being most proficient with a printer and least proficient with a smarboard. This definitely indicates a shift in what technological knowledge a professor will need verses their students.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article gives a few quick insights into how technology is useful in academic advising. This article makes the distinction between technology "complementing" advising and actually impacting student success. In other words, technology should never be a sole substitute for success. I would like to see more numerical-based data supporting the claims listed, but there are some great resources cited.

      Rating: 7/10

  20. Oct 2018
  21. Aug 2018
    1. (Sometimes, in the early years, I called these the Service System and the User System)

      As he does in the Project MAC memo, summer 1963.

    2. By 1959 1 was lucky enough to get a small grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR, from Harold Wooster and Rowena Swanson) which carried me for several years -- not enough for my full-time work, but by 1960 SRI began pitching in the difference.

      Actually, I think Doug has this backwards, at least from what I can see in the archives. SRI did pitch in half of his salary, but that seems to have been the first funding, in early 1960. The AFOSR proposal was submitted in mid-December 1960 and the funding, which allowed Doug to go full-time, kicked in in March, 1961.

  22. Jul 2018
    1. Teaching digital literacy does not mean teaching digital skills in a vacuum, but doing so in an authentic context that makes sense to students. It means teaching progressively rather than sequentially, which helps learners understand better and more clearly over time

      Teachers need to make content more meaningful to students. If students are able to link classroom content to real world learning it gives students a better understanding.

      cofcedu

    1. —Miranda Dean, undergraduate student, In ‘What an Open Pedagogy Course Taught Me About Myself

      This post is soooooo good. Take a moment to read this when you get a chance. Student voice in this post is really amazing.

    1. we also consider the needs of our students when designing learning experiences

      Needs of our students more important than standards

  23. May 2018
    1. The Students at the Center Hub is a resource for educators, families, students and communities wanting to learn more about research, best practices, supportive policies, and how to talk about student-centered approaches to learning.
    1. However, although these sub-optimal choices are less prevalent among our sample, once again, they are disproportionately made by those who hold student loans and work the most. Indeed, one can easily conceive of a negative cycle wherein the need to work more hours in order to pay for tuition and textbooks necessitates taking fewer courses, an outcome that delays graduation and requires taking on more student loan debt. Alternatively, cash-strapped students might elect to do without one or more required textbooks. However, in this scenario it would not be surprising for them to perform more poorly (as was reported by nearly a third of respondents in the present study), an outcome that might necessitate repeating a course, once again resulting in a delayed graduation and the accumulation of more student loan debt.
  24. Apr 2018